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Science and Technology "Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known." - Carl Sagan.

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Old March 27 2014, 08:44 AM   #46
CorporalCaptain
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Re: Why don't they crash?

gturner wrote: View Post
Well, the sun is moving around the galaxy at about 500,000 miles per hour, which sounds like a lot, but it isn't when compared to any FTL travel. At twice the speed of light you'd only have to lead the sun's position by an arc-minute, which means that for some random star that doesn't have a crazy velocity, to hit it you'd have had to been aiming at it from the start with the same accuracy you'd have with a modern off-the-shelf scoped hunting rifle.
Something tells me that they wouldn't be measuring proper motion with a device of such limited accuracy.
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Old March 27 2014, 01:40 PM   #47
B.J.
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Re: Why don't they crash?

Edit_XYZ wrote: View Post
So - you can either use FTL sensors (even more 'magic' than FTL travel) to see the star or you can calculate the stars' current position by using models we know today.
If you must 'see' where a star is NOW, you can always use its gravitational or electrostatic field to detect it (you need insanely accurate sensors for this, though).
I don't think so. According to current understanding, gravity also moves at the speed of light. So you'd be no better off than locating it visually and accounting for any velocity.
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Old March 27 2014, 07:32 PM   #48
Edit_XYZ
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Re: Why don't they crash?

B.J. wrote: View Post
Edit_XYZ wrote: View Post
So - you can either use FTL sensors (even more 'magic' than FTL travel) to see the star or you can calculate the stars' current position by using models we know today.
If you must 'see' where a star is NOW, you can always use its gravitational or electrostatic field to detect it (you need insanely accurate sensors for this, though).
I don't think so. According to current understanding, gravity also moves at the speed of light. So you'd be no better off than locating it visually and accounting for any velocity.
On this issue, what you think is irrelevant.
EM/gravitational waves move at the speed of light.
According to current understanding, static gravitational and electrostatic fields created by inertially moving objects affect distant objects instantaneously. This is even experimentally verified with the sun.
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Old April 13 2014, 01:20 PM   #49
varek
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Re: Why don't they crash?

I thought they had navigational sensors that automatically steered the ship away from large gravity wells.
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Old April 17 2014, 09:38 PM   #50
RAMA
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Re: Why don't they crash?

I didn't read the thread..but I'd expect you'd find two answers:

Stars are so far apart in a galaxy that even two galaxies colliding wouldn't produce stars hitting each other at all(at least not directly till further along the timeline). A ship would be even less likely.

The second answer: If you're theorizing bypassing normal space in one of many iterations of Supra-luminal flight you would never encounter a planet, star or normal matter.
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Old April 18 2014, 01:45 AM   #51
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Re: Why don't they crash?

Good points, RAMA. We earthbound people tend to have limited perspectives on distance.
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