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Old August 27 2014, 03:53 AM   #706
cardinal biggles
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Re: Donny's TOS Enterprise Interiors

Donny wrote: View Post
And so begins work on the TWOK Bridge. I have a feeling this will take at least a month, maybe two.

Here is what I have after several tests to make sure I build these bridge segments in the correct dimensions. Because there are no 100% correct and/or official schematics out there, I've had to confer with several fan-made blueprints and artists who have tackled the area before. Because it is imperative that I get the dimensions of these bridge segments at least 90% close to what they actually were in order to sell the realism of this bridge, I spent days just measuring and comparing to screencaps and schematics.

I think the results look pretty accurate, compared to the dimensions of the door, which I've already confirmed as 99% accurate.

What do you think?
I think they look awesome, and I can't wait to see what you do with this bridge — the Wrath of Khan bridge is my favorite, particularly with all the design work that Lee Cole and others put into the displays and consoles. Unlike TOS, they weren't just blinky lights and candy-colored buttons, everything had a defined function, and there was a logic and flow to the layout. I'm sure you'll knock this out of the park.

edit: I'll admit, I don't know the first thing about what you're doing, I just like looking at the beautiful renders. When you have this ready for a walkthrough, does the program you're using allow you to have some sort of looping animation on the display screens?
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Old August 27 2014, 04:21 AM   #707
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Re: Donny's TOS Enterprise Interiors

Donny wrote: View Post
To answer all the previous questions:

Unreal still heavily relies on lightmaps (static lights), and sometimes ugly artifacts can appear as a result (see the shadows at the bottoms of the turbolift panels). Real-time lighting (mobile lights) is possible, however it is very performance draining if not used sparingly. There are new types of lights in Unreal 4 called "stationary" lights, which use a combination of lightmaps and real-time lighting, but they are limited to how much they can be used in a given area. An area, like the corridor, which uses many lights, has to rely mostly on static (lightmapped) lights due to the limitations.

In case you are wondering, the light generated from the bottom corridor panels is static lighting, whereas the blue light coming from the ceiling structures of the corridor are stationary lights.

I use a combination of all the different types of lights (static, stationary, and mobile) to achieve different results. It should be noted, however, that the screencaps I've shown thus far have been baked with "preview" lighting to save time. The final builds before release will use "production" lighting, which will be of a much higher quality.

And yes, BJ, it is possible to simulate red-alert lighting or a power-outage type lighting change in-game.

Regarding textures: I am relying more and more on building textures solely through the use of 3ds Max and Unreal 4's material editor. I use 3ds Max to bake ambient occlusion and normal maps from high-poly geometry, then arrange them with various colors, textures, and shader functions in Unreal 4 to create very powerful shaders.

I use Photoshop sparingly, mainly for the creation of graphics, decals, and the like. Because the Federation interiors are very clean, I hardly ever need to open Photoshop unless to tweak a texture here and there.

If I do a Klingon interior, or something else a little more dirty or natural, then I'll have to rely on Photoshop much more. ZBrush is another powerful texture creation tool, allowing you to paint right onto the models themselves and then extracting that information for textures.
As some one who uses Zbrush, Mudbox, and Photoshop, I find that Zbrush is amazing for sculpting, hands-down. Mudbox is really strong in texturing and pipeline, you can bring a mesh directly into Mudbox without a glitch-y plugin like GoZ. I find Photoshop really good for making base repeatable textures and Texture cleanup, any texture map from Mudbox I find to be really pixelated.

Another option would be to get the Quixel Suite, it's a plugin that makes photoshop a lot more powerful, and I found that it's really good for game engine texturing.

You can find that here:http://quixel.se/index

On that though, stellar work man. I would pay for that level quality.

Keep it up!
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Old August 27 2014, 06:57 PM   #708
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Re: Donny's TOS Enterprise Interiors

Cjohnson1701 wrote: View Post
As some one who uses Zbrush, Mudbox, and Photoshop, I find that Zbrush is amazing for sculpting, hands-down. Mudbox is really strong in texturing and pipeline, you can bring a mesh directly into Mudbox without a glitch-y plugin like GoZ. I find Photoshop really good for making base repeatable textures and Texture cleanup, any texture map from Mudbox I find to be really pixelated.

Another option would be to get the Quixel Suite, it's a plugin that makes photoshop a lot more powerful, and I found that it's really good for game engine texturing.

You can find that here:http://quixel.se/index

On that though, stellar work man. I would pay for that level quality.

Keep it up!
Thanks for that. I am actually now considering purchasing Mudbox, as I didn't realize it is an alternative to ZBrush, which I find difficult to use due to its differences from other 3D modelling programs. Since Mudbox is made by Autodesk, I'm sure it'll make a lot more sense to me.
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