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Old February 22 2014, 09:26 PM   #31
{ Emilia }
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

I've never been into making lists when it comes to music. Music does mean a lot to me but what I like really depends on my mood. There's certainly some songs or albums that are important to me but I'd feel bad about listing anything because I know I'd be forgetting something.

The one album that stands out for a specific reason is Pink Floyd's The Wall because it introduced me to concept albums. I'm an "album listener" generally, I don't just listen to one song. So concept albums are perfect for me.
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Old February 22 2014, 09:33 PM   #32
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

I don't have a definitive list, music is important to me though but its all fragmented, sometimes I need to listen to Eno's Apollo: Atmospheres and Soundtracks, sometimes it has to be Ayreon's Dream Sequencer, sometimes Rammstein or Lacuna Coil, sometimes Dash Berlin, Armin van Buren or Ferry Corsten and sometimes Purple Motion's tracker music.
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Old February 22 2014, 09:45 PM   #33
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

{ Emilia } wrote: View Post
I've never been into making lists when it comes to music. Music does mean a lot to me but what I like really depends on my mood. There's certainly some songs or albums that are important to me but I'd feel bad about listing anything because I know I'd be forgetting something.
That's what the loophole is for

CorporalClegg wrote: View Post
trekkiedane wrote: View Post
My own fault for calling the thread something with the words "influential albums",
Yeah. As I said, it effected my list as apposed to if I had just gone with my 10 favorite albums or even with what I thought were the 10 best. (Two very different lists in their own right.)
This is not about what happens to be your favourite(s) right now (which all 'best of' lists would end up being anyway), but about mentioning something (in this case: 'albums') that have had a profound (or maybe less so) influence on you, which you did, so why am I writing this?
[And even while the thread progresses I find things I neglected to put on mine in the OP ]

Santaman wrote: View Post
Eno's Apollo: Atmospheres and Soundtracks
Oooh, yes! the For All Mankind-soundtrack is fantastic!

And his first Ambient album, Music for Airports, I just found unbearably well made, so much that I chased it for years (even paid a couple of record-shops to do it for me) before 'finding' it on-line in recent times.
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Old February 22 2014, 10:06 PM   #34
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

CorporalClegg wrote: View Post
Ancient Mariner wrote: View Post
Just one more reason to listen to the music, and not the critics.
Well, when it comes to The Division Bell, critics seem to bear a striking resemblance to Star Trek fans and STiD, where the opinion seems to clash heavily with the reality. I mean, how to you give any album with "High Hopes" on it one star? Or call Gilmour's playing "bored and uninspired wanking." So bored and uninspired they gave him a Grammy for it. Want to hear Dave Gilmour bored and uninspired? Go listen to Atom Heart Mother. (I'm going to pay for that one.)

Granted, for the most part, the lyrics left something to be desired. Gilmour could never write to save his life, but Polly can write a little, and she at least added an aesthetic quality to the lyrics that was missing on Momentary Lapse... And she was able to tap into that Watersesque quality of taking something simple and obvious and flipping it over to become mind-blowingly profound with "Keep Talking."

That's not to say it's some masterpiece either, but handing out "Fs" and half-star grades like it's some epic piece of shit is total buffoonery.

As you can tell, it's sort of a sore spot with me.
I hear ya. Fortunately, I never paid much attention to the critics at the time the album was released, so I was able to enjoy it on its own merits. There's also a strange little feedback loop going on there, with the critics hammering Gilmour whilst he sings, "What do you want from me? ... Play 'till my fingers are raw? You're so hard to please." It's almost as if the critics weren't just judging the album against the previous successes of the band, but also perception of what the band had meant to music in general. Then again, that lack of communication, as well the clash between opinion and reality as you mentioned, merely reinforce the "Division Bell" concept.

In any case, I found enough enjoyment in the music and depth to the lyrics and concepts that the album had a lasting impact on me.
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Old February 22 2014, 10:21 PM   #35
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

Here are some albums that meant a lot to me at some point in my life:

Styx - Paradise Theater - I was 10 or 11 years old when this came out, and my friend Brett bought the album right away. I pirated a cassette copy of the album, and listened to it over and over. Side 1 of the album was fantastic.

Journey - Escape - Not a bad song on the album, and nice guitar work by Neal Schon; although Don't Stop Believin' is way overplayed. Stone in Love is still a favorite.

Beach Boys Endless Summer - Reminds me a lot of High School.

The Who - Who's Next - Actually pretty much everything by The Who is great.

When Harry Met Sally soundtrack - Mostly Harry Connick Jr.

Dave Brubeck - Take Five - I listen to this at work at least once a week.

Willie Nelson - Stardust - My parents had this album and I stole it when I went to college.

Bad English - Loved Journey, loved The Babys. Nice combination of both bands.

Jimmy Barnes - Freight Train Heart - I stumbled across this one by accident. Barnsey's vocals are so good.

Eric Clapton - Journeyman
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Old February 22 2014, 10:25 PM   #36
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

As per thread title, these aren't exclusively favourites (though inevitably are), but definitely albums that changed my thinking/appreciation of what music can achieve, intellectually, emotionally and sonically:

Miles Davis - Kind Of Blue
Floyd - Dark Side/Wish You Were Here
Bowie - Diamond Dogs
Public Enemy - Fear Of A Black Planet
Wagner - Ring cycle
Kraftwerk - Trans-Europe Express
Marvin Gaye - What's Going On?
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Old February 22 2014, 10:27 PM   #37
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

For me:

Songs From The Big Chair, Tears For Fears (first album that I ever bought as a kid; taught me a lot about musical arrangements from listening to it over and over again).

World Machine, Level 42 (after hearing this album, I knew that I wanted to become a bass player--and I did).

Rattle and Hum, U2 (even though The Joshua Tree introduced me to U2, I didn't really become a lifelong fan until this subsequent album).

Issues, KoRn (introduced me to a new style of bass playing that I still occasionally do today--also was my go-to album during my carefree "I don't give a f---" phase).
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Old February 22 2014, 10:37 PM   #38
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

Not necessarily the greatest albums in the world, nor my complete and utter favourites, and indeed in many cases not ones I owned for myself, but these did have an impact on me at a personal level. A word of warning: there are more than 10:

"Sing The Blues" - The Simpsons. The first album I bought. Also, my first introduction to that famous cartoon family.

"Bad" - Michael Jackson. It belonged to my big sister, but she played it to death. We all loved it and would take turns listening to it on my sister's Walkman.

"True Blue" - Madonna. Another of my big sister's albums, and it formed the soundtrack to a memorable summer in the south east of England.

"NOW 21" - various artists. We listened to a number of the earlier "Now That's What I Call Music" compilation pop albums, but number 21 was the one I played the most out of my cousin's hi-fi back in the day, and years later I tracked down a CD version for myself. Still one of the best, along with NOW 20.

"The Stone Roses" - The Stone Roses. Yet another one of my big sister's (much of my musical taste stems from her) and one that she would keep singing to us at every opportunity. I tracked down a re-release of the seminal album on its 10th anniversary in 1999, and it's one of my most played and favourite albums of all time.

"Automatic For The People" - R.E.M. It formed the soundtrack of the autumn of 1994, a particularly memorable and emotional time for me. I shall say no more at this point.

"Holst - The Planets" - Berliner Philharmoniker / Karajan. Classical music meant a lot to me as well as popular music, and still does. These days, classical music comes in various different recordings, albums and releases, and no one particular recording springs to mind when it comes to how they influenced me - for me, it's more the composition itself than the interpretation that holds greater influence. That said, this particular recording was one that my violin teacher once owned on CD, and months later I bought it on cassette and would play it on our car stereo. The sound of the car engine pretty much drowned out "Neptune: The Mystic" much to my annoyance.

"The Greatest Classical Album In The World... Ever!" - various artists. This particular classical music album, with its full works and excerpts of famous pieces, was one of our most played, and in fact was the first recording that we ever bought on CD.

"Everything Must Go" - Manic Street Preachers. One of my friends was really into the Manics in the mid-90s (at the start of their post-Richey, Britpop period) and wore T-shirts with their slogans all the time. It was still a great album with memorable tunes, and a Third Way for those bored of the Oasis vs Blur rivalry (me, I also liked Pulp ).

"You've Come A Long Way, Baby" - Fatboy Slim. The first dance album I bought, and a venture into the unknown for me. I was at Uni at the time, and I wanted to try out new music tastes. Still a favourite.

"Revolver" - The Beatles. My first proper introduction to the Fab Four, courtesy of a music student who played the album non-stop during a European trip. From there, there was no turning back.

"Vertigo" - Groove Armada. Another dip into the unknown, this formed the soundtrack of summer 1999, the most memorable summer of my life.

"The Facts Of Life" - Black Box Recorder. One of my personal favourites, it was pretty much a reminder of the close friendships I had developed at University, and the similar music tastes we had - we all owned this album. I occasionally play the whole album again from time to time.

"The Parker Tapes" - Cassetteboy. At times an early 21st Century relic and curio, it's still savage and a reminder of my subversive side amid all the political and newsworthy stuff going on in the world at the time.

"The Grey Album" - Danger Mouse. The point where mashup really started to get noticed, and perfect fuel for my Noughties obsession with mashup.

"Franz Ferdinand" - Franz Ferdinand. The first major album bought during my working life, and it brings up memories of finding my feet in the big world and deciding what sort of career path I wanted to take.

"LOVE" - The Beatles. The official Beatles mashup album, and one that evokes specific memories of owning my own house and trying to make a life for myself. Musically, it also opened up my appreciation of the Beatles back catalogue even further.

"Discovery" - Daft Punk. One of my favourite electronic music albums, and one of the best albums to listen to in the car. It served as a reminder of all those work commutes I would undertake, often to far away places.

"The Holy Bible" - Manic Street Preachers. I revisited this album not too long ago, at a time when I was starting to become disillusioned with the way things were going. Not a bright and cosy time, and perhaps the choice of music reflected that.

"A Boot Up The Eighties" - 10000 Spoons. One of my favourite mashup albums, and one where every song involved invokes a specific memory, character or person from my past and present.

"OK Computer" - Radiohead, and "Dark Side of the Moon" - Pink Floyd. I remember playing these two on a constant loop during a dark and troubling period in life just a few years ago. It served as the soundtrack for my wanting to throw everything away and start again. Which I duly did.



There will no doubt be more to come.
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Old February 22 2014, 10:48 PM   #39
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

{ Emilia } wrote: View Post
I've never been into making lists when it comes to music. Music does mean a lot to me but what I like really depends on my mood. There's certainly some songs or albums that are important to me but I'd feel bad about listing anything because I know I'd be forgetting something.
I agree with this for the most part. I generally don't like "best of" lists to begin with because with many things--especially artistic things--it's so subjective.

And also because "best" often gets interchanged with "favorite" despite the two should be mutually exclusive.

That said, I do see the importance of lists if only as a means of recognition.
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Old February 22 2014, 10:54 PM   #40
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

I mostly just posted the albums that I can listen to over and over again and never get tired of.
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Old February 22 2014, 10:57 PM   #41
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

Kirby wrote: View Post
Beach Boys Endless Summer - Reminds me a lot of High School.
Only recently have I encountered The Beach Boys, but today I understand why Pet Sounds is such a popular album; it is good!
Dave Brubeck - Take Five - I listen to this at work at least once a week.
Also a newcomer in my world -and I love it.
lurok wrote: View Post
Kraftwerk - Trans-Europe Express
Autobahn -but only the first side (well: the track Autobahn) -I'm still looking for my cassette (even though I know it's gone the same way as my Dodo).
C.E. Evans wrote: View Post
World Machine, Level 42 (after hearing this album, I knew that I wanted to become a bass player--and I did).
Brilliant album (had to put it on right as I saw it mentioned here)
Zion Ravescene wrote: View Post
"Revolver" - The Beatles. My first proper introduction to the Fab Four, courtesy of a music student who played the album non-stop during a European trip. From there, there was no turning back.
I think it would be fair to mention that it's my favourite of theirs.
SCULLY: Mulder, you brought me out here on the pretense of investigating an unexplained death. Can you tell me why we're standing out here in the middle of a field looking at a dead goat?

MULDER: Well, according to eyewitnesses, the death we're investigating was preceded by a Fortean event. That's a highly unusual or infrequent meteorological phenomenon also known as a transient.

SCULLY: A transient.

MULDER: Yeah. Witnesses described a bright flash about 30 degrees off the horizon, then a hot yellow rain fell from a cloudless sky. Fortean researchers call these "liquid falls." Black and red rains are the most common, but there have also been reported cases of blue, purple and green rains.

SCULLY: Purple rain?

MULDER: Yeah. Great album. Deeply flawed movie, though.
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Old February 22 2014, 11:10 PM   #42
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

trekkiedane wrote: View Post
Zion Ravescene wrote: View Post
"Revolver" - The Beatles. My first proper introduction to the Fab Four, courtesy of a music student who played the album non-stop during a European trip. From there, there was no turning back.
I think it would be fair to mention that it's my favourite of theirs.
"Abbey Road" is still my favourite. The Beatles going out with a bang with a strong line-up of their finest songs and "Maxwell's Silver Hammer."
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Old February 22 2014, 11:29 PM   #43
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

Where to begin? There are so many albums that I love from a wide range of genres and over several decades. I'll try a few:

Pink Floyd - The Division Bell: A lot has been said on this already, and I didn't even know it suffered critically. I thought it was the perfect way to go for Pink Floyd, and although certainly not as creative as Water's I like the lyrics. "What Do You Want From Me", "Wearing The Inside Out" (that Sax <3) and "High Hopes" are certainly stand outs.
I don't have the energy to type about all of these but my other favourite Floyd albums are: The Dark Side Of The Moon, Wish You Were Here, Meddle, The Wall and that early single with Barrett "See Emily Play".

Keane - Hopes & Fears and Strangeland: Hopes & Fears reminds me of my childhood- "Bedshaped" and "Somewhere Only We Know" especially, the songs are fantastically written, the piano in there is beautifully done. Although I also love the albums in between, Strangeland was the album in which they returned to their roots.

Owl City - Ocean Eyes: The first album I bought myself. The thing I love about Owl City, or at least this era of his is his innovative style, with both lyrics and sound. I thought it was fantastic (before anyone says anything, I think 'Give Up' by the Postal Service is fantastic and of a very similar if not the same genre but the songs themselves are not similar enough to warrant the criticism Ocean Eyes sometimes gets). Now I find it much harder to relate to a lot of electronic music but because this is so different from most electronic stuff and I already love it there's no going back.
This is mostly here for nostalgic reasons.

Ok, if I type explanations for everything I'll be here all night so I'll just list whatever I can think of in no particular order:


And I've left tonnes out, check the link for Last.FM in my signature if you like, it's much easier just to see what I listen to.
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Old February 22 2014, 11:31 PM   #44
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

Zion Ravescene wrote: View Post
"Abbey Road" is still my favourite. The Beatles going out with a bang with a strong line-up of their finest songs and "Maxwell's Silver Hammer."


That's what happens When I use the word favourite... now I'm not so sure any more -Nah, I think I'll stay with Revolver for now.
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Old February 23 2014, 12:14 AM   #45
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Re: The most influential albums in your life.

I'm going to just tell you about 2 albums

Now That's What I Call Music 2 - UK edition, various artists.

I'm not kidding you here This came out in 1984, when I was 8. It is the first album I bought with my own money. I used all my birthday money, it cost £8 as it was a double album, which was a lot of money then, especially for an 8 year old. I remember saying I wanted to buy The Works by Queen because it had Radio Ga Ga on it, but my parents talked me into buying that instead because as they pointed out, it had Radio Ga Ga on it and a lot of other songs that were popular too. Not really advice I thank them for as most of the rest of the songs were crap, but it is what it is.

But the important thing is, it had Radio Ga Ga on it, and I wore the album out playing that song over and over.

A Kind of Magic - Queen

It is not Queen's best by a long long shot and is nowhere near to being my favourite album, but that fever around the Magic tour and their performance at Live Aid the year before was what really cemented my interest in music, and this is the album they had out around that time. I remember Freddie Mercury seemed like a superhero to me, holding thousands in thrall. Nobody else has ever commanded a stage quite like that.

And he was rude, I remember that. He said fuck a lot and nobody even seemed to care. He must be something really special!

Incidentally Live Aid was also the day I found out what gay meant, and that Freddie Mercury was gay. I remember particularly because my neighbour's son told me while we were watching Queen and explained what it meant, and his mother scolded him and said that as a fan, I wouldn't want to find out he was gay, which seemed to me like a much more horrible thing to say.
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