RSS iconTwitter iconFacebook icon

The Trek BBS title image

The Trek BBS statistics

Threads: 138,200
Posts: 5,346,124
Members: 24,604
Currently online: 569
Newest member: LanCo96

TrekToday headlines

Funko Mini Spock
By: T'Bonz on Jul 23

IDW Publishing Comic Preview
By: T'Bonz on Jul 23

A Baby For Saldana
By: T'Bonz on Jul 23

Klingon Beer Arrives In The US
By: T'Bonz on Jul 22

Star Trek: Prelude To Axanar
By: T'Bonz on Jul 22

Abrams Announces Star Wars: Force For Change Sweepstakes
By: T'Bonz on Jul 22

New Funko Trek Figure
By: T'Bonz on Jul 21

Saldana As A Role Model
By: T'Bonz on Jul 21

San Diego Comic-Con Trek Fan Guide
By: T'Bonz on Jul 21

Cumberbatch As Turing
By: T'Bonz on Jul 21


Welcome! The Trek BBS is the number one place to chat about Star Trek with like-minded fans. Please login to see our full range of forums as well as the ability to send and receive private messages, track your favourite topics and of course join in the discussions.

If you are a new visitor, join us for free. If you are an existing member please login below. Note: for members who joined under our old messageboard system, please login with your display name not your login name.


Go Back   The Trek BBS > Entertainment & Interests > Science and Technology

Science and Technology "Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known." - Carl Sagan.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old January 13 2014, 04:20 AM   #46
gturner
Admiral
 
Location: Kentucky
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

I was slightly mistaken. "Smiths" tend not to be related, but people with rarer surnames generally are. 40 Surnames study

We found that men with rare surnames - such as Grewcock, Wadsworth, Ketley and Ravenscroft - tend to share Y chromosomes that are very similar, suggesting a common ancestor within the past 700 years. However, men with frequent surnames, such as Smith, are no more likely to have a recent common ancestor than men chosen at random from the general population - they derive from a person's trade and would have been adopted many times by unrelated people.

One of the most familiar of the rarer names we studied was Attenborough. In a random sample of Attenboroughs - including spelling derivations such as Attenborrow - almost nine out of ten men share the same Y chromosome type.
Another interesting study is here (pdf) where the researchers are using DNA and surnames to figure out more about Viking settlement in Britain.
gturner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 08:46 AM   #47
Rhubarbodendron
Commodore
 
Rhubarbodendron's Avatar
 
Location: milky way, outer spiral arm, Sol 3
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

RJDiogenes wrote: View Post
^^ I'll bite my tongue.
So did I. As we usually think the same way I assume you, too, wondered if the currently dominating species on this planet can rightfully be called intelligent if it requires warnings like "peanut brittle. Warning: may contain traces of peanuts"
__________________
Down with boredom! Post in the Lounges!
Rhubarbodendron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 10:39 AM   #48
iguana_tonante
Admiral
 
iguana_tonante's Avatar
 
Location: Italy, EU
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

gturner wrote: View Post
I was slightly mistaken. "Smiths" tend not to be related, but people with rarer surnames generally are. 40 Surnames study
There are about 200 people with my last name in Italy, most of them in the same town. I think it's a given we are all more or less related, including the ones living away from the original hometown like myself.

The origin of the name is lost in time: it could go back to an ancient Roman family, but it's impossible to know for sure.
__________________
Scientist. Gentleman. Teacher. Fighter. Lover. Father.
iguana_tonante is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 10:48 AM   #49
RJDiogenes
Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion
 
RJDiogenes's Avatar
 
Location: RJDiogenes of Boston
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

Rhubarbodendron wrote: View Post
RJDiogenes wrote: View Post
^^ I'll bite my tongue.
So did I. As we usually think the same way I assume you, too, wondered if the currently dominating species on this planet can rightfully be called intelligent if it requires warnings like "peanut brittle. Warning: may contain traces of peanuts"
Indeed.
__________________
Please stop by my Gallery and YouTube Page for a visit. And read Trunkards!
RJDiogenes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 10:56 AM   #50
Rhubarbodendron
Commodore
 
Rhubarbodendron's Avatar
 
Location: milky way, outer spiral arm, Sol 3
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

iguana_tonante wrote: View Post
There are about 200 people with my last name in Italy, most of them in the same town. I think it's a given we are all more or less related, including the ones living away from the original hometown like myself.

The origin of the name is lost in time: it could go back to an ancient Roman family, but it's impossible to know for sure.
A pity. Maybe you can find a source after all? They discover old archieves all the time and in your country the warm climate preserves documents rather well.
I can trace my family back to the 1500s, but in my case it's really very simple as there have never been many of us (currently 11 in the whole world). Our name translates as "people who come from where they cut the shubbery" (and yes, we know the exact spot It's still owned by relatives of us)
__________________
Down with boredom! Post in the Lounges!
Rhubarbodendron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 11:31 AM   #51
iguana_tonante
Admiral
 
iguana_tonante's Avatar
 
Location: Italy, EU
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

Rhubarbodendron wrote: View Post
iguana_tonante wrote: View Post
The origin of the name is lost in time: it could go back to an ancient Roman family, but it's impossible to know for sure.
A pity. Maybe you can find a source after all? They discover old archieves all the time and in your country the warm climate preserves documents rather well.
That's unlikely. Two thousand years does that.
__________________
Scientist. Gentleman. Teacher. Fighter. Lover. Father.
iguana_tonante is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 11:57 AM   #52
Rhubarbodendron
Commodore
 
Rhubarbodendron's Avatar
 
Location: milky way, outer spiral arm, Sol 3
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

Don't give up hope. Only recently they discovered loads of Roman military diplomas in a village nearby: carved on thin bronze sheets and completely legible
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fi...4rdiplom_2.jpg
If your ancestors were belligerent, there's a chance you can trace them
(also, there's always the possibility of genetic comparisms, particularly the mitochondrial RNA)
__________________
Down with boredom! Post in the Lounges!
Rhubarbodendron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 04:11 PM   #53
Christopher
Writer
 
Christopher's Avatar
 
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

Rhubarbodendron wrote: View Post
Our name translates as "people who come from where they cut the shubbery" (and yes, we know the exact spot It's still owned by relatives of us)
Are you telling us that you're one of the Knights of Ni?
__________________
Christopher L. Bennett Homepage -- Site update 4/8/14 including annotations for Rise of the Federation: Tower of Babel

Written Worlds -- My blog
Christopher is online now   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 06:28 PM   #54
iguana_tonante
Admiral
 
iguana_tonante's Avatar
 
Location: Italy, EU
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

Rhubarbodendron wrote: View Post
Don't give up hope. Only recently they discovered loads of Roman military diplomas in a village nearby: carved on thin bronze sheets and completely legible
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fi...4rdiplom_2.jpg
If your ancestors were belligerent, there's a chance you can trace them
(also, there's always the possibility of genetic comparisms, particularly the mitochondrial RNA)
That's interesting, but I am not particularly interested in researching it. Even if it turns out I am the direct descendant of a corrupt, debased, vile Roman consul, it would be nothing more than a cool topic to use at parties.

I know some people are genealogy enthusiasts, but I am not particularly into it.
__________________
Scientist. Gentleman. Teacher. Fighter. Lover. Father.
iguana_tonante is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 07:22 PM   #55
DarthTom
Fleet Admiral
 
DarthTom's Avatar
 
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

Rhubarbodendron wrote: View Post
RJDiogenes wrote: View Post
^^ I'll bite my tongue.
So did I. As we usually think the same way I assume you, too, wondered if the currently dominating species on this planet can rightfully be called intelligent if it requires warnings like "peanut brittle. Warning: may contain traces of peanuts"
Well, blame the lawyers for that one. People sue product manufacturers and win for less - in this case if you had a peanut allergy. Oh, and we can thank the lawyers on why at a Dr.'s office the voice mail message also says, ' ... if you're calling about a medical emergency, please hang up and dial 911,' as if someone wouldn't already know to to so.
DarthTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 07:25 PM   #56
YellowSubmarine
Commodore
 
YellowSubmarine's Avatar
 
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

You ought to look for your noble roots. People should know these things. It might turn out that you're descended from someone very important, like the Mitochondrial Eve or the Y-chromosomal Adam.
__________________
R.I.P. Cadet James T. Kirk (-1651)
YellowSubmarine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 08:13 PM   #57
Christopher
Writer
 
Christopher's Avatar
 
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

Really, pretty much everyone is descended from a number of important historical figures. I mean, let's say as a simplifying assumption that each historical individual had an average of, oh, three children that each lived to adulthood and had three children in turn, and so on. So in successive generations they'd have 3 descendants, 9 descendants, 27 descendants, and so forth. After just 21 generations, then, they'd have 10 billion descendants, more than enough to include everyone on Earth. And that's only 4-500 years. Maybe that's overoptimistic, though, but even if the average number of surviving descendants is only 2, it would take about 33 generations to produce nearly 9 billion descendants, so maybe 7-800 years for one person's genes to spread through every individual on the planet. Although that's grossly simplified, of course, but it gives a sense of the magnitudes involved. Probably everyone you've ever heard of who lived 1000 years ago or more is a direct ancestor of yours, if they had any children at all, or a close relative of one if they didn't. So being descended from someone famous really isn't a big deal, if they're from that long ago.

Then again, it only takes about 7-800 years for the genes of any single ancestor to be so diluted in the sheer mass of ancestors as to make no measurable contribution to your genome at all. So that kind of cancels it out.
__________________
Christopher L. Bennett Homepage -- Site update 4/8/14 including annotations for Rise of the Federation: Tower of Babel

Written Worlds -- My blog
Christopher is online now   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 08:18 PM   #58
Timelord Victorious
TARDIS Janitor
 
Timelord Victorious's Avatar
 
Location: Germany, Earth, the Solar System
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

Genealogy... the only pyramid scheme that works because everyone joins in!
Timelord Victorious is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 08:51 PM   #59
gturner
Admiral
 
Location: Kentucky
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

The caveat to that is that some indigenous peoples don't really have a major historical figure because they weren't writing things down.
gturner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2014, 09:22 PM   #60
Christopher
Writer
 
Christopher's Avatar
 
Re: A question about past evolution on earth

Even so, there would be more interbreeding there than you'd think. A number of the cultures that anthropologists have thought of as "pristine" and totally cut off from human contact since the dawn of time are often more like the descendants of formerly more connected populations that got driven into the wilderness by plague or invasion or something.
__________________
Christopher L. Bennett Homepage -- Site update 4/8/14 including annotations for Rise of the Federation: Tower of Babel

Written Worlds -- My blog
Christopher is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:56 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
FireFox 2+ or Internet Explorer 7+ highly recommended.