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Science and Technology "Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known." - Carl Sagan.

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Old January 10 2014, 04:45 PM   #16
DarthTom
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Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

Neil de Grasse Tyson has the right idea on how to get people interested in space in this article:

Huffington
Tyson emphasized that many of the things that have endeared him to people outside of the field of astrophysics — such as "discovering" Superman's home planet Krypton, thereby making real science part of the superhero's lore — were easily replicable by his audience. [25 Most Iconic Superman Images]
"I'm not wielding any special knowledge here," he said. "Any one of us could have done it."

and



In order to help the public continue to understand and enjoy science, Tyson urged his fellow astronomers to reconsider how they interact with the media.
He recalls his first televised interview, which he said he gave in his best professor-lecture style. At one point, he gave a demonstration of how a star "jiggles" as a planet orbits it. When he watched the news, only his dancing hips made the cut.
"I had been sound-bitten," he said.
At that point, he determined to take control of his interactions with the media.
The press thrives on sound bites, he explained. Scientists can either complain about it or go with it. Tyson decided to go with it. He spent time in front of a mirror perfecting sound bites on various subjects.
"Informative, tasty, and makes you want to smile a bit — that's the essence of a sound bite," he said.
Baking pizza on Venus
Tyson repeatedly emphasized the importance of explaining things in terms that people can understand and connect with.
The atmosphere of Venus, for instance, is often described as "hot enough to melt lead." But how many non-scientists have any experience with lead-melting temperatures? Instead, Tyson determined how long it would take to bake a pizza on the surface of the planet and used that as a field of reference. (The answer is 3 seconds; his original answer of 9 seconds was corrected by a physicist-turned-master-chef).
"When you hand people literally tasty things, they play with it," he said. They remember the information and make it a part of their life. Science is no longer something distant that they struggled with in school but something real.
Tyson also sees the value of participating in social media. For example, he has 1.5 million followers on Twitter, allowing him to reach many people very quickly.
"I think it's extraordinary that a scientist can have 1.5 million Twitter followers," he said.
Astronomers and other scientists have a special opportunity to educate the masses, Tyson said. He reminded the audience members that they have experiences and perspectives that the general public does not.
"We think stuff every day that is unthinkable to the public," he said. "Never take this for granted."
He encouraged scientists to share their knowledge with the public in fun and interesting ways.
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Old January 10 2014, 06:26 PM   #17
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Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

All due respect to Tyson, learning to talk in sound bites is a lousy way to present science, or world events. All that does is cater to the ADHD-style of broadcast "news," which is often misleading due to incomplete reporting.

Science and its discoveries can be made accessible to the layman, but they cannot be made interesting.
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Old January 10 2014, 06:44 PM   #18
DarthTom
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Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

Metryq wrote: View Post
All due respect to Tyson, learning to talk in sound bites is a lousy way to present science, or world events. All that does is cater to the ADHD-style of broadcast "news," which is often misleading due to incomplete reporting.

Science and its discoveries can be made accessible to the layman, but they cannot be made interesting.
I disagree. I think finding, "Krypton," or a planet that has the likely real life chractertics of Krypton as described in the superman comics and films makes astrophysics interesting to a lot more people than calling it planet AEY-312 and perhaps encourages younger people to get into the field.
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Old January 10 2014, 07:31 PM   #19
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Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

Metryq wrote: View Post
^ Mars Needs 1950s Hubcaps?
No, they need women.

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Old January 10 2014, 07:50 PM   #20
gturner
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Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

DarthTom wrote: View Post

I disagree. I think finding, "Krypton," or a planet that has the likely real life chractertics of Krypton as described in the superman comics and films makes astrophysics interesting to a lot more people than calling it planet AEY-312 and perhaps encourages younger people to get into the field.
I think publicly revealing the location of the planet Krypton is the height of scientific misconduct, needlessly exposing Superman's home planet to any number of potentially hostile forces just to get a few sound bites on the evening news.
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Old January 11 2014, 03:56 AM   #21
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Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

DarthTom wrote: View Post
I think finding, "Krypton," or a planet that has the likely real life chractertics of Krypton as described in the superman comics and films makes astrophysics interesting to a lot more people than calling it planet AEY-312 and perhaps encourages younger people to get into the field.
Actually, the comic called it LHS 2520, not AEY-312, neither of which is real nomenclature. The six-page story does nothing to explain interferometry, or how it is used in astronomy. In fact, no astronomy tools were used to integrate the data—Superman did it all in his head. (Magic.)

The story invoked black holes and wormholes, both of which are fictitious mathematical constructs, in order to get Superman to Earth "instantaneously" so 27 years later he could witness the destruction of a planet 27 lightyears away. (The Pick-a-card maneuver.)

How does any of this popularize or introduce real science?
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Old January 11 2014, 05:08 AM   #22
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Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

Wait, blackholes are fictional? Huh, guess all that evidence for them is faked.
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Old January 19 2014, 11:26 PM   #23
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Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

larryman wrote: View Post
I won't watch Gravity, because it is 'hard'. I will continue to demand flying saucer space craft, or at least saucer-shuttle craft, and warp-drive starships. Going 'hard' means going 'rocket' - which means: mass-pollution, and going nowhere.

I'm ok with cutting NASA, as long as NASA favors rockets and spaceplanes over flying saucers - for human spaceflight. I want a new national space agency, that does not have 'aeronautics' in it's name.
Well, rockets are what we have, and they work. I don't buy anti-gravity at all.
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/2433/1
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Old January 23 2014, 08:03 AM   #24
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Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

larryman wrote: View Post
I'm ok with cutting NASA, as long as NASA favors rockets and spaceplanes over flying saucers - for human spaceflight. I want a new national space agency, that does not have 'aeronautics' in it's name.
lulz
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Old January 23 2014, 12:43 PM   #25
larryman
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Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

publiusr wrote: View Post
larryman wrote: View Post
I won't watch Gravity, because it is 'hard'. I will continue to demand flying saucer space craft, or at least saucer-shuttle craft, and warp-drive starships. Going 'hard' means going 'rocket' - which means: mass-pollution, and going nowhere.

I'm ok with cutting NASA, as long as NASA favors rockets and spaceplanes over flying saucers - for human spaceflight. I want a new national space agency, that does not have 'aeronautics' in it's name.
Well, rockets are what we have, and they work. I don't buy anti-gravity at all.
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/2433/1
Do you buy gravity? Note... that Earths gravity is not produced by air pressure, or rocket thrust. Overcoming gravity attraction should be as logical as overcoming magnetic attraction - by use of the opposing polarity (Dark Energy?).

Your linked article states:
"First of all, getting into space doesn’t require emitting any carbon in principle. Rocket engines are only carbon emitters if they’re burning hydrocarbons; some engines that powered the US Space Shuttles and Saturn rockets burned hydrogen, not carbon."

The writer glosses over their required burning of kerosene in Saturn Vs' 1st stage, and aluminum in the Shuttles' SRB rockets. Try breathing those exhaust fumes!

"Well, rockets are what we have..."
A 19th century automobile:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horse_and_buggy
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