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Old July 23 2013, 09:48 PM   #1
Location: Great Britain
The Earth - as viewed from Saturn

The Earth and the Moon as seen from Saturn.

Just shows how small our planet actually is.
On the continent of wild endeavour in the mountains of solace and solitude there stood the citadel of the time lords, the oldest and most mighty race in the universe looking down on the galaxies below sworn never to interfere only to watch.
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Old July 24 2013, 03:05 AM   #2
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Re: The Earth - as viewed from Saturn

MacLeod wrote: View Post
Just shows how small our planet actually is.
Naked eye, it is just a point of light. A real indicator of the distance is the span between Earth and Moon. I believe the Moon was almost at its maximum angular distance, as seen by its orbit almost edge-on. That tiny span is around 400,000 km. Even then, the blurring/halation of the points of light gives a false sense of scale.

(Try planetarium software, such as Celestia. Jump to Saturn, then "look back." Turn on orbits and select Earth. Now think about how long it would take to walk that span between Earth and Moon. We're going to need some serious engines to explore the Solar system, let alone reach another star.)

In other words, our planet isn't small. The spaces between the planets is very vast.
"No, I better not look. I just might be in there."
—Foghorn Leghorn, Little Boy Boo
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Old July 28 2013, 03:15 PM   #3
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Re: The Earth - as viewed from Saturn

When you think about it, space is so big that VY Canis Majoris looks like a dot to the naked eye. Hell, almost all galaxies do.

But our planet is tiny too.
Objects in mirror are bluer than they appear
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