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Go Back   The Trek BBS > Misc. Star Trek > Trek Tech

Trek Tech Pass me the quantum flux regulator, will you?

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Old July 2 2013, 03:00 PM   #46
mos6507
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Re: Do turbolifts have any sense?

All interiors have "negative space" taken up by corridors, stairs, etc... It's simply not possible to pack every square inch of a ship with more useful stuff.
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Old July 3 2013, 09:54 AM   #47
Mytran
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Re: Do turbolifts have any sense?

Timo wrote: View Post
The tri-ladders pose the problem of not having a visible means of being sealed either vertically or horizontally, though.
Maybe not, but the entry "doorways" could easily be sealed by standard pocket doors that are simply left open all the time (and so appear to be not there). Closing off just the entry points would have the advantage of making the whole tube still usable even if certain decks along the ladder were decompressed.
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Old July 3 2013, 10:01 AM   #48
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Re: Do turbolifts have any sense?

This brings up the question of whether those pocket doors are pressure-proof. We see standard cabin doors supposedly act as a barrier against the dikironium cloud in "Obsession", but physically these are flimsy structures, rather easily forced by Khan, and lacking in anything that would resemble an airtight threshold.

In TNG, the interior doors are clearly just "cardboard", brushing against carpeting, stopping nothing, and blown out of their hinges by the impact of a body thrown about. In ENT, there's lots of heavy metal there to suggest the exact opposite. Where does TOS fit in between these two?

We see those curious A-frames on various corridor locations aboard Kirk's ship. Scissoring pressure doors that swing in place under the failure-proof gravitic pull of the floor? The rest of the interior between such doors might be a single pressure vessel, any doors therein serving only "decorative" purposes.

It's a bit worrisome, then, that the turbolift doors appear to be much the same as the cabin doors. Is the entire shaft network open to ambient air / breach vacuum?

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Old July 3 2013, 03:31 PM   #49
Albertese
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Re: Do turbolifts have any sense?

In may own take on the Enterprise deck plans, turboshafts run through the various hull pressure compartments and there are emergency doors which seal off the tubes if that compartment is compromised. This does mean that the length of tube in the compromised compartment is not accessible. But, that's okay, because I've made sure that every section of the ship is accessible by means of stairs, ladders, and regular hallways.

BTW, in my arrangement, the tri-ladders are only those ladderways which interconnect hull pressure compartments. Since they are in their own tubes, they are easily sealed off in the event of a breach.

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Old July 3 2013, 04:27 PM   #50
Robert Comsol
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Re: Do turbolifts have any sense?

The tri-ladder could just be surrounded by a simple revolving mechanism (similar to the revolving wall closet in the cabins). In case of compartment decompression the corresponding deck segment tube just rotates to seal off the area, so you could use the tri-ladder as long as there are compartments unaffected by decompression.

Bob
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Old July 3 2013, 05:15 PM   #51
Timo
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Re: Do turbolifts have any sense?

That's the elegant option I'd prefer!

So... What about those red grilles that are so commonly used as interior elements? Vital load-bearing structures made lightweight and transparent by the honeycombing? Or just psychologically important dividers of space?

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Old July 3 2013, 11:29 PM   #52
Mytran
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Re: Do turbolifts have any sense?

As we're now talking doors, I feel I ought to point out that TOS was the only incarnation of Trek (including the movies) that depicted two sets of doors on the turbolifts. It's a nice example of attention to realistic detail that had disappeared by even 1979.
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Old July 3 2013, 11:56 PM   #53
Crazy Eddie
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Re: Do turbolifts have any sense?

Mytran wrote: View Post
As we're now talking doors, I feel I ought to point out that TOS was the only incarnation of Trek (including the movies) that depicted two sets of doors on the turbolifts. It's a nice example of attention to realistic detail that had disappeared by even 1979.
Would you believe I never actually noticed that until DS9 showed us turbolifts with no interior doors?
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Old July 4 2013, 12:54 AM   #54
MacLeod
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Re: Do turbolifts have any sense?

Cardassian design, perhaps instead of doors there is some sort of forcefield.
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Old July 4 2013, 07:47 AM   #55
blssdwlf
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Re: Do turbolifts have any sense?

Timo wrote: View Post
That's the elegant option I'd prefer!

So... What about those red grilles that are so commonly used as interior elements? Vital load-bearing structures made lightweight and transparent by the honeycombing? Or just psychologically important dividers of space?
They appear to be used in the engine room and also in the dilithium energizer room as some type of shield as well as a physical divider. Perhaps the grid pattern blocks out the specific frequency range of radiation that the engine and power systems puts out?
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Old July 4 2013, 08:08 AM   #56
Robert Comsol
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Re: Do turbolifts have any sense?

blssdwlf wrote: View Post
They appear to be used in the engine room and also in the dilithium energizer room as some type of shield as well as a physical divider. Perhaps the grid pattern blocks out the specific frequency range of radiation that the engine and power systems puts out?
I had the same thoughts. Probably some kind of universally efficient structure and material, hence we saw it in Yonada's engine room, too, in "For the World Is Hollow..". There it did seem to have the quality of a shield protecting the console's operator (hence my inspiration for that thought).

Bob
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Old July 4 2013, 11:21 AM   #57
Timo
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Re: Do turbolifts have any sense?

Cardassian design, perhaps instead of doors there is some sort of forcefield.
Apparently, there's nothing at all - no inner doors, not even inner walls. Just railings to hold on to. Which is a bit dangerous, and apparently how Cardassians like it.

Well, okay, there's a bit of wall there, behind the backs of the users. It's even a plot point in "Crossfire" where a falling lift can be stopped by Odo thrusting his arms against this wall segment and bulging it out against the shaft walls.

I guess the back wall is handy when the lift is traveling sideways - it prevents the occupants from being blown off the platform by the onrushing air. But it's quite clear that there is air in the shafts normally, just like there is air in the TNG or TOS-movie shafts every time our heroes venture into those (but those are special emergencies).

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