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Old April 17 2013, 10:00 AM   #16
Timo
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

They become geriatric at the same time we do, but their advancements have made geriatric living better and last longer
...Yet the show makes some attempt to show that Jean-Luc Picard is a decade older than Patrick Stewart, and physically very fit even for somebody who'd be Stewart's age today.

McCoy was two feet, one arm and four fingers into grave in "Farpoint" at 137, but does that mean he was doing extremely well for somebody his age, or extremely poorly? He has lived a demanding life, and his body has been violated by all possible and impossible ailments. Perhaps somebody like wiry Admiral Chekote is a better example of a 130+-yr-old in the 24th century?

Certainly O'Brien's comment about wanting to die at 150 establishes that this is a rarely (if ever) achieved age in the 24th century, as obviously the Chief isn't in a hurry to leave.

Timo Saloniemi
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Old April 17 2013, 08:24 PM   #17
t_smitts
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

Timo wrote: View Post
They become geriatric at the same time we do, but their advancements have made geriatric living better and last longer
...Yet the show makes some attempt to show that Jean-Luc Picard is a decade older than Patrick Stewart, and physically very fit even for somebody who'd be Stewart's age today.

McCoy was two feet, one arm and four fingers into grave in "Farpoint" at 137, but does that mean he was doing extremely well for somebody his age, or extremely poorly? He has lived a demanding life, and his body has been violated by all possible and impossible ailments. Perhaps somebody like wiry Admiral Chekote is a better example of a 130+-yr-old in the 24th century?

Certainly O'Brien's comment about wanting to die at 150 establishes that this is a rarely (if ever) achieved age in the 24th century, as obviously the Chief isn't in a hurry to leave.

Timo Saloniemi
Indeed. Perhaps the Dax / O'Brien line is the equivalent of predicting someone today will live to be 100.

While the AVERAGE lifespan is undoubtely longer than today and perhaps more than a century, I wonder what the extreme longevity record at that point is. Might there be some little old lady in a retirement home somewhere on Earth who's celebrated her 170th or 180th birthday, perhaps telling journalists about the time she met Former President Jonathan Archer or Ambassador T'Pol or a young lieutenant named Christopher Pike?
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Old April 18 2013, 05:09 AM   #18
Gary7
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

The other thing is... living longer is only beneficial if you have good health. If you're suffering from chronic pain and bound to a wheel chair or bed for a couple of decades, I wouldn't call that quality living. Stephen Hawking is an exception, of course.
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Old April 18 2013, 08:19 AM   #19
robau
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

T'Girl wrote: View Post
t_smitts wrote: View Post
King Daniel wrote: View Post
The last movie made mention of Admiral Archer
Yes, and Memory Alpha pointed out that Archer would've been 145 at the time of Abrams-Trek, which I personally think it more than pushing it.
If you remember the dialog, the movie actually mentions Admiral Archer's beagle.

Archer himself could have been dead a half century by that point.

My private theory is that Porthos is also dead by that time, but his body is preserved and on display at Starfleet Academy, Porthos is Starfleet's mascot. Scotty stole it from the student union for his transporter experiment.

Recent issue of the comic showed a living dog in the experiment. It's also made clear that Archer is alive.
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Old April 18 2013, 02:53 PM   #20
F. King Daniel
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

Same Archer, same Porthos. He just visited Re-Pet a few times between 2154 and 2258.
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Old April 18 2013, 08:20 PM   #21
The Wormhole
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

robau wrote: View Post
T'Girl wrote: View Post
t_smitts wrote: View Post

Yes, and Memory Alpha pointed out that Archer would've been 145 at the time of Abrams-Trek, which I personally think it more than pushing it.
If you remember the dialog, the movie actually mentions Admiral Archer's beagle.

Archer himself could have been dead a half century by that point.

My private theory is that Porthos is also dead by that time, but his body is preserved and on display at Starfleet Academy, Porthos is Starfleet's mascot. Scotty stole it from the student union for his transporter experiment.

Recent issue of the comic showed a living dog in the experiment. It's also made clear that Archer is alive.
Although they don't actually go the full distance and confirms that it is Jonathan Archer. In fact, given that Admiral Archer is apparentally still on active duty, it kind of implies it's not him.
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Old April 18 2013, 09:21 PM   #22
robau
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

The Wormhole wrote: View Post
robau wrote: View Post
T'Girl wrote: View Post
If you remember the dialog, the movie actually mentions Admiral Archer's beagle.

Archer himself could have been dead a half century by that point.

My private theory is that Porthos is also dead by that time, but his body is preserved and on display at Starfleet Academy, Porthos is Starfleet's mascot. Scotty stole it from the student union for his transporter experiment.

Recent issue of the comic showed a living dog in the experiment. It's also made clear that Archer is alive.
Although they don't actually go the full distance and confirms that it is Jonathan Archer. In fact, given that Admiral Archer is apparentally still on active duty, it kind of implies it's not him.
Good point. How do the ages work out had Archer had a child post-Enterprise?
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Old April 18 2013, 09:33 PM   #23
mos6507
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

I think whatever the answer is, it probably won't excuse having Checkov in Renegades.
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Old April 18 2013, 10:12 PM   #24
C.E. Evans
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

robau wrote: View Post
The Wormhole wrote: View Post
robau wrote: View Post

Recent issue of the comic showed a living dog in the experiment. It's also made clear that Archer is alive.
Although they don't actually go the full distance and confirms that it is Jonathan Archer. In fact, given that Admiral Archer is apparentally still on active duty, it kind of implies it's not him.
Good point. How do the ages work out had Archer had a child post-Enterprise?
The Archer in Star Trek XI could be either a grandson in his 70s or a great-grandson in his 50s, IMO. He may even have Jonathan as a first name.
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Old April 18 2013, 10:19 PM   #25
F. King Daniel
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

mos6507 wrote: View Post
I think whatever the answer is, it probably won't excuse having Checkov in Renegades.
McCoy was the oldest TOS crewmember and was alive in "Encounter at Farpoint". Chekov was the youngest of the TOS crew, so...
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Old April 18 2013, 10:23 PM   #26
R. Star
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

King Daniel wrote: View Post
mos6507 wrote: View Post
I think whatever the answer is, it probably won't excuse having Checkov in Renegades.
McCoy was the oldest TOS crewmember and was alive in "Encounter at Farpoint". Chekov was the youngest of the TOS crew, so...
Chekov just appears like he's going to play the role of the Admiral giving orders. So an extra at best. I don't see an issue with him being behind a desk giving orders.

Is it campy? Sure as hell. But what do you expect? It's a fanfilm made by the hardcore fans at their own expense. It's to be expected. I personally think it's cool as heck, Koenig, Russ and so many others are jumping on board with this. I doubt it will be high quality at all, but it'll be some entertainment. I'm looking forward to this more than Into Darkness really.
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Old April 19 2013, 12:15 AM   #27
Chrono85
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

The 'Admiral Archer' mentioned in 09's Star Trek, is definitely the same Jonathan Archer from STE, as Bob Orci stated in an interview. Plus, he has a beagle, which is a strong hint that it is the same Archer I guess 140 isn't entirely unusual in the world of Star Trek, with healthier living, little to no disease, and some technologies to artificially extend life.
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Old April 19 2013, 12:41 AM   #28
t_smitts
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

C.E. Evans wrote: View Post
robau wrote: View Post
The Wormhole wrote: View Post

Although they don't actually go the full distance and confirms that it is Jonathan Archer. In fact, given that Admiral Archer is apparentally still on active duty, it kind of implies it's not him.
Good point. How do the ages work out had Archer had a child post-Enterprise?
The Archer in Star Trek XI could be either a grandson in his 70s or a great-grandson in his 50s, IMO. He may even have Jonathan as a first name.
Indeed. Archer seems too modest to name a son after himself, but I could see his son or grandson naming their own son in honor of him.

Then again, there have been a few prominent political families with multiple generations with the same name. There's currently a Theodore Roosevelt V (technically he's actually Theodore VI) and an Aldai Stevenson V.
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Old April 19 2013, 01:11 AM   #29
robau
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Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

Adlai Stevenson

What next, Spiro Agnew?
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Old April 19 2013, 06:22 AM   #30
t_smitts
Commander
 
Re: How long do humans typically live in the 24th Century?

robau wrote: View Post
Adlai Stevenson

What next, Spiro Agnew?
Actually, the men with that name had some pretty impressive accomplishments.

The first Adlai was Vice-President during Grover Cleveland's first term. The name skipped a generation to his grandson Adlai II, the best known of the bunch. He, of course, ran against Eisenhower and lost twice, but as UN Ambassador he's remembered well for busting the balls of his Soviet counterpart during the Cuban Missile Crisis (which would of course inspire that scene in ST6). Adlai III was a US senator from Illinois throughout the 1970's
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