RSS iconTwitter iconFacebook icon

The Trek BBS title image

The Trek BBS statistics

Threads: 135,690
Posts: 5,213,287
Members: 24,207
Currently online: 838
Newest member: Stevie Trek


Welcome! The Trek BBS is the number one place to chat about Star Trek with like-minded fans. Please login to see our full range of forums as well as the ability to send and receive private messages, track your favourite topics and of course join in the discussions.

If you are a new visitor, join us for free. If you are an existing member please login below. Note: for members who joined under our old messageboard system, please login with your display name not your login name.


Go Back   The Trek BBS > Star Trek TV Series > Star Trek - Original Series

Star Trek - Original Series The one that started it all...

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old February 24 2013, 10:49 PM   #76
Redfern
Commodore
 
Redfern's Avatar
 
Location: Georgia, USA
Re: "The Slaver Weapon"



Not relevant to the discussion other than it is a drawing of a Kzin I made in either the late 80s or the early 90s.

Yep, believe it or not, long ago I used to actually draw with graphite and paper rather than putter with Poser.

Sorry about the lens flare. At the time I thought it looked cool. (Look, Ma! No snide joke about J.J. Abrams...oh, wait.)

Sincerely,

Bill
__________________
Tempt the Hand of Fate and it'll give you the "finger"!

Freighter Tails: the Misadventures of Mzzkiti
Redfern is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 28 2013, 02:01 AM   #77
Therin of Andor
Admiral
 
Therin of Andor's Avatar
 
Location: New Therin Park, Andor (via Australia)
View Therin of Andor's Twitter Profile
Re: "The Slaver Weapon"

Christopher wrote: View Post
For that matter, Americans in the '70s wouldn't have seen pink that way. I've seen episodes of '70s TV shows...
Australia got colour TV in 1975, about the same time as lilac bodyshirts hit the shops.

For that matter, when the custom of color-coded blue and pink baby clothes first came into use in the 1910s-20s, it was pink that was the boys' color
50s/60s it had become the total opposite. Amazing.

The really big pink-for-men resurgence in fashion I recall was Don Johnson's tops in "Miami Vice" in the 80s.
__________________
Thiptho lapth! Ian (Entire post is personal opinion)
The Andor Files @ http://andorfiles.blogspot.com/
http://therinofandor.blogspot.com/
Therin of Andor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 28 2013, 04:16 PM   #78
Forbin
Admiral
 
Forbin's Avatar
 
Location: I said out, dammit!
Re: "The Slaver Weapon"

Maybe that's why my parents painted my room pink and my sister's room blue. And caused me life-long emotional stress!!
Forbin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22 2013, 05:05 AM   #79
iarann
Lieutenant
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Re: "The Slaver Weapon"

Christopher wrote: View Post
or that somebody, upon hearing of the Xindi attack, would've mistaken the name for "Kzinti."
It is worth noting this mistake would have been unlikely as Kzinti is pronounced with a hard k sound: K-zinti. I always assumed (probably wrongly) that the Xindi were named as an homage, but the pronunciation is different.
iarann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22 2013, 11:51 AM   #80
Timo
Admiral
 
Re: "The Slaver Weapon"

Of course, when you try to pronounce "Xindi" with a mouth full of fangs...

Timo Saloniemi
Timo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22 2013, 01:54 PM   #81
Christopher
Writer
 
Christopher's Avatar
 
Re: "The Slaver Weapon"

iarann wrote: View Post
Christopher wrote: View Post
or that somebody, upon hearing of the Xindi attack, would've mistaken the name for "Kzinti."
It is worth noting this mistake would have been unlikely as Kzinti is pronounced with a hard k sound: K-zinti.
On the contrary -- people hearing a new word for the first time often mistake it for a similar, but non-identical, word they're already familiar with. Because that's how the brain works -- by association, by trying to map new input onto established patterns in its memory. In a universe where Kzinti existed as an established threat, people hearing "Xindi" for the first time would naturally be prone to think the speaker had said "Kzinti." They might not notice the difference at first, or they might notice it but be unsure if they'd heard correctly, or they might wonder if the speaker had misspoken.

Heck, I once had a high-school science teacher who said "Aristophanes" (the playwright) when he meant "Eratosthenes" (the scientist). And an honors English teacher who pronounced "synecdoche" as "synectady." These were people who really should know better, and they still got the pronunciations confused, not just once, but as a matter of habit. It happens all the time.
__________________
Christopher L. Bennett Homepage -- Site update 1/21/14 including non-spoiler discussion for Rise of the Federation Book 2

Written Worlds -- My blog
Christopher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22 2013, 02:48 PM   #82
Marsden
Lieutenant Commander
 
Marsden's Avatar
 
Location: USS Excalibur What could go wrong?
Re: "The Slaver Weapon"

And some people assume the written name is a silent K, like knight or know.
Marsden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22 2013, 03:09 PM   #83
CorporalCaptain
Vice Admiral
 
CorporalCaptain's Avatar
 
Location: Kentucky
Re: "The Slaver Weapon"

Plus, X at the start of a word isn't always pronounced Z.

xing (abbreviation for crossing, may be pronounced eks-ing)
Xian (abbreviation for Christian)
Xmas (abbreviation for Christmas, may be pronounced eks-mas)
__________________
John
CorporalCaptain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22 2013, 03:58 PM   #84
Timo
Admiral
 
Re: "The Slaver Weapon"

Or, indeed, Xing (a proper name, pronounced with an "sh" or "hs" sound, and perhaps most intuitively transliterated as Ching)...

Or Xhosa, where the first sound is a clicking, guttural type of "k". At least if it's the word for the Xhosa language, rather than the Petarian name for a Petarian transport...

Timo Saloniemi
Timo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22 2013, 05:18 PM   #85
Christopher
Writer
 
Christopher's Avatar
 
Re: "The Slaver Weapon"

CorporalCaptain wrote: View Post
Plus, X at the start of a word isn't always pronounced Z.
When I was proofreading the galley pages for my upcoming Enterprise novel, I tried using the Adobe Reader's speech synthesizer to read the text aloud to help me compare it against my manuscript, and it decided to pronounce Xindi as "shin-dee," as if it were a Chinese or Nahuatl word. (The Xindi do not appear in the book, but are name-dropped.)


Xian (abbreviation for Christian)
Xmas (abbreviation for Christmas, may be pronounced eks-mas)
Although neither of those is actually an X; it's really the Greek letter chi, corresponding to English "ch," and the initial letter of "Christ" in the Greek alphabet. (I've heard some religious types complain about "Xmas" as an abbreviation, believing that it was censoring Christ's name as part of the atheist "war on Christmas" or whatever, but actually it's just his initial in the very alphabet he himself would probably have written it in, given that Greek was the lingua franca of the Eastern Roman Empire at the time he would've lived.)
__________________
Christopher L. Bennett Homepage -- Site update 1/21/14 including non-spoiler discussion for Rise of the Federation Book 2

Written Worlds -- My blog
Christopher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22 2013, 06:36 PM   #86
CorporalCaptain
Vice Admiral
 
CorporalCaptain's Avatar
 
Location: Kentucky
Re: "The Slaver Weapon"

Christopher wrote: View Post
Xian (abbreviation for Christian)
Xmas (abbreviation for Christmas, may be pronounced eks-mas)
Although neither of those is actually an X; it's really the Greek letter chi, corresponding to English "ch," and the initial letter of "Christ" in the Greek alphabet. (I've heard some religious types complain about "Xmas" as an abbreviation, believing that it was censoring Christ's name as part of the atheist "war on Christmas" or whatever, but actually it's just his initial in the very alphabet he himself would probably have written it in, given that Greek was the lingua franca of the Eastern Roman Empire at the time he would've lived.)
Hmm. No.

Etymologically, it's from the letter Chi, of course.

But, when either word is rendered in the Latin Alphabet, which is what we use, the letter is most definitely X, capital ex. (ETA: That is to say, the symbol was latinized.)

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/xmas
__________________
John
CorporalCaptain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22 2013, 07:48 PM   #87
Christopher
Writer
 
Christopher's Avatar
 
Re: "The Slaver Weapon"

^Well, sure, but I wanted to make the point about how the intent behind the abbreviation has been misinterpreted by some people.
__________________
Christopher L. Bennett Homepage -- Site update 1/21/14 including non-spoiler discussion for Rise of the Federation Book 2

Written Worlds -- My blog
Christopher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22 2013, 07:54 PM   #88
CorporalCaptain
Vice Admiral
 
CorporalCaptain's Avatar
 
Location: Kentucky
Re: "The Slaver Weapon"

Christopher wrote: View Post
^Well, sure, but I wanted to make the point about how the intent behind the abbreviation has been misinterpreted by some people.
Oh, right. Yeah, in particular, it's not a swipe against Christ, at least not intentionally, as far as I know. It simply stands for the initial, in Greek.

And pronouncing X like Chi would be a wholly different pronunciation from ex, in Ancient Greek approximately aspirated k. Which brings us back full circle to Kz, almost at least.
__________________
John
CorporalCaptain is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:16 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
FireFox 2+ or Internet Explorer 7+ highly recommended.