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Old February 15 2013, 02:24 PM   #31
DarthTom
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

Galileo7 wrote: View Post
Agree. The Jupiter 2 sets[both upper and lower decks] are still an impressive setting for a series.
Actually I think the UN-aired pilot for Lost in Space in some respects is more impressive than some of the later episodes - discounting that you'd think they'd envision that TV cameras wouldn't miniaturize.

Lost in Space pilot
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Old February 15 2013, 04:41 PM   #32
Mr. Adventure
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

Donald Draper wrote: View Post
Fixating on fashion as a reason something is dated is redundant. Fashion by definition is dated.

Paul McCartney's song "Vintage Clothes" is spot on

Don't live in the past
Don't hold on to something that's changing fast
What we are, is what we are and what we wear
Is vintage clothes, vintage clothes:

We jump up for joy
Who cares if we look like a girl or boy
What we are, is what we are and what we wear
Is vintage clothes, vintage clothes:

A little more, a little tall
Check the rack
What went out, is coming back

Don't live in the past
Don't hold on to something that's changing fast
What we are, is what we are and what we wear
Is vintage clothes, vintage clothes:

A little more, a little tall
Check the rack
What went out, is coming back
Meaning what is the current fashion will soon be dated. Than come back into fashion. Its cyclical.
Why shiouldn't the guy live in the past if everything is coming back?
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Old February 15 2013, 10:04 PM   #33
Redfern
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

DarthTom wrote: View Post
Galileo7 wrote: View Post
Agree. The Jupiter 2 sets[both upper and lower decks] are still an impressive setting for a series.
Actually I think the UN-aired pilot for Lost in Space in some respects is more impressive than some of the later episodes - discounting that you'd think they'd envision that TV cameras wouldn't miniaturize.

Lost in Space pilot
I'll agree. Think about all that happened in that single hour (plus a few minutes). The launch, the meteor shower, the plummet into the atmosphere, the crash, the evacuation of the ship, the sea storm, and we end with a cliffhanger implying a possible hostile "first encounter". That thing was a roller-coaster ride almost worthy of Indiana Jones!

And at least the ship, originally designated the Gemini XII, made more sense. There was only that single "flight deck", no "impossible to fit" lower level. At least that version theoretically had room for an "engine" and a ground vehicle "kit".

Sincerely,

Bill
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Old February 16 2013, 11:09 PM   #34
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

I would say that Quantum Leap has aged well, but it's kind of a cheat given that it's a show almost always set in the past. There are a couple of episodes where we see more of the future, and it doesn't play too well today; but overall, I think the series will hold up indefinitely.

Sliders season one and two have also held up pretty good; but there's some really dated technology that pops up from time to time (like the big CRT monitors for computers they frequently use), and that pulls you out of the show for a minute (or at least it does me).

However, I believe that one which is going to hold up incredibly well is Farscape. The only part that could ever date it are the pop culture references; but the beauty is that future audiences will just instead identify with the aliens who find it confusing. I believe that the high production values and great story will only lead Farscape to become more appreciated as the years go by.
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Old February 17 2013, 03:47 AM   #35
USS Kongo
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

TemporalFlux wrote: View Post
However, I believe that one which is going to hold up incredibly well is Farscape. The only part that could ever date it are the pop culture references; but the beauty is that future audiences will just instead identify with the aliens who find it confusing. I believe that the high production values and great story will only lead Farscape to become more appreciated as the years go by.
I agree. Farscape is well-written, well-acted and has great production values. It should only garner more fans as time goes by.

Another series that also holds up extremely well is Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. I rewatched a couple of seasons for the first time in about twelve years, and was pleasantly surprised at how good it was overall.

Sean
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Old February 17 2013, 03:50 AM   #36
Shawnster
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

Firefly ought to age pretty well. The Western motif will never seem more out of touch later as opposed to now, and none of the computer displays look liked anything we currently or previously have.
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Old February 17 2013, 03:57 AM   #37
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

^I dunno... I think as America's population continues to grow more diverse, audiences will look more askance on a supposedly hybrid Chinese/Western culture that doesn't seem to have any actual Asian people in it.
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Old February 17 2013, 03:58 AM   #38
Nerys Myk
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

TREK_GOD_1 wrote: View Post

I'm not sure if the DS9 or ENT interiors will hold up that well some 30-40 years from now.
The station is alien, so I think it will hold up.

The NX-01 has a kind of utilitarian look that I think will age well.
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Old February 17 2013, 04:26 AM   #39
theenglish
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

I think that there are two things that can date a show. The first is the overall design, and in many cases, there is really no getting around it. Buck Rogers, "early" episodes of TNG, TOS and many others all "look" dated. The other thing that dates a show is dialogue and references that try to look "hip" at the time of production. Disco references in seventies shows, or the classic "hippy Eden" episode of TOS are examples of this.

For me, what makes a show stand up after time is not its appearance, but the actual content therein. In that respect much of the various incarnations of Trek really hold up, as does a show like Farscape--which is set in a specific earth period anyway. For me, shows like Buck Rogers were dated less than a decade after they aired.

One thing that holds up quite well over the last fifty years is the design of the actual starships or bases in many programs. The Enterprise is an iconic design as is the Battlestar Galactica or even Moonbase Alpha. I really admire the design work in many of these shows.
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Old February 17 2013, 05:52 AM   #40
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

theenglish wrote: View Post
I think that there are two things that can date a show. The first is the overall design, and in many cases, there is really no getting around it. Buck Rogers, "early" episodes of TNG, TOS and many others all "look" dated. The other thing that dates a show is dialogue and references that try to look "hip" at the time of production. Disco references in seventies shows, or the classic "hippy Eden" episode of TOS are examples of this.

For me, what makes a show stand up after time is not its appearance, but the actual content therein. In that respect much of the various incarnations of Trek really hold up, as does a show like Farscape--which is set in a specific earth period anyway. For me, shows like Buck Rogers were dated less than a decade after they aired.

One thing that holds up quite well over the last fifty years is the design of the actual starships or bases in many programs. The Enterprise is an iconic design as is the Battlestar Galactica or even Moonbase Alpha. I really admire the design work in many of these shows.
The other thing that can badly date a show are decidedly retrograde attitudes about cultural/social issues. Shows with conservative cultural attitudes tend to look backwards for more modern audiences.

Socieities generally tend to become more permissive and accepting over time...so shows that touch on those issues in a negative way will look out of date faster. For instance, TOS' attitudes towards racial integration was much more liberal and optimistic than American culture of the mid 60s. As a result, its attitudes on race look rather unremarkable to a modern audience and make it look less dated. Conversely, the rampant sexism in Lost in Space REALLY dates that show badly. The women, despite supposedly being briliant scientists and explorers in their own right are frequently left at home doing dishes, folding laundry and making dinner while the men folk go off and have adventures. Lost in Space actually feels more like a 50s show when it comes to its attitudes towards women.

Star Trek also has some problems in terms of attitudes toward women, but it gets some credit for trying to break out of its 60s box. Where TOS really falls short is its bizarre...almost luddite attitudes towards computers. TOS has a near hysterical paranoia about computers and mechanization that seems odd to a 21st century audience that walks around with computers in their pockets. Now compare this to say Lost in Space, where the Robot was a valued and trusted member of the family. A better example can be found in comparing an episode of Star Trek with Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. The first season of Voyage featured an episode called "The Human Computer" where the US government fits the SeaView with an advanced computer capabable of running the ship and doing all of the things that the human crew could do. At a basic level, its very similar to the TOS episode "The Ultimate Computer." The difference in tone between the episodes is that where as TOS has a paranoid fear of coputers running wild, the Voyage episode never has invokes fear of the computer. In fact that worrying part of the episode was that it would be stolen and used by the soviets.
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Old February 17 2013, 08:47 AM   #41
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

Gotham Central wrote: View Post
TOS has a near hysterical paranoia about computers and mechanization that seems odd to a 21st century audience that walks around with computers in their pockets.
This audience accepted the conceit for BSG and The Matrix and they did use the computer extensively on the Enterprise. I have to admit though that Kirk did like to stick it to the machines.
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Old February 17 2013, 05:44 PM   #42
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

It's true that some TOS episodes treated computers as dangerous, yet at the same time, there were episodes that treated the ship's computer as downright oracular, with the characters asking it to solve complex problems and suggest solutions for them. Like in "Mirror, Mirror," the ease with which the mirror ship's computer calculates and confirm's Kirk's hypothesis about dimensional transfer and is somehow able to tell them how to fix it. (Although the MU's prior experience with dimensional transfer in "In a Mirror, Darkly" could retroactively explain that.) Or in "Wink of an Eye," where Spock not only asks the computer to explain the invaders' purpose, but asks it for a recommendation on how to respond. It reminds me of the way computers were often portrayed in the prose SF of the '50s. At the time, computers were less familiar, so there was an exaggerated set of beliefs about their potentials, and it went both ways -- they were feared for their power, yet also revered for it, seen as almost supernaturally wise and omniscient.
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Old February 17 2013, 07:56 PM   #43
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

Mr. Adventure wrote: View Post
I have to admit though that Kirk did like to stick it to the machines.
The scripted handling of Kirk's feelings in "The Ultimate Computer" actually predicted the future well; today, many in once tradtional factory/assembly industries, security and medical patient records/registration positions are angered that computer controlled "labor" increasingly phases out the human element every few years. It does not help that the consumer culture's blank-eyed lust for everything happening yesterday / gadget conveience, encourages industry (public and private) to cut costs while pursuing what is percieved as the more efficient business model.
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Old February 17 2013, 09:10 PM   #44
Greg Cox
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

TOS definitely had mixed feelings about computers and technology in general. Beyond the obvious cases where Kirk outsmarted some sort of berserk super-computer, you also have Samuel Cogley defending man against the machine in "Court-Martial" and Lenore Karidian going on about how technology is making people less human in "Conscience of the King."

Granted, Lenore turns out to be crazy, but . . . .
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Old February 17 2013, 11:28 PM   #45
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Re: Which Sci-Fi shows have aged the best?

TREK_GOD_1 wrote: View Post
Mr. Adventure wrote: View Post
I have to admit though that Kirk did like to stick it to the machines.
The scripted handling of Kirk's feelings in "The Ultimate Computer" actually predicted the future well; today, many in once tradtional factory/assembly industries, security and medical patient records/registration positions are angered that computer controlled "labor" increasingly phases out the human element every few years. It does not help that the consumer culture's blank-eyed lust for everything happening yesterday / gadget conveience, encourages industry (public and private) to cut costs while pursuing what is percieved as the more efficient business model.
Very good observations. The obvious physical depictions of computers aside, or the lack of understanding of modern AI, much of TOS thematic depiction of computers still resonates with our world today. The idea of people become lost in virtual realities or online, computers tracking our movements, or even people being accused of misconduct wrongly because of misreading digital evidence.

In many ways, it was an excellent predictor of our current conflicting opinions of the digital world.
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