RSS iconTwitter iconFacebook icon

The Trek BBS title image

The Trek BBS statistics

Threads: 139,608
Posts: 5,425,580
Members: 24,807
Currently online: 605
Newest member: Dixonn

TrekToday headlines

IDW Publishing December Trek Comics
By: T'Bonz on Sep 17

September Loot Crate Features Trek Surprise
By: T'Bonz on Sep 16

USS Enterprise Miniature Out For Refit
By: T'Bonz on Sep 16

Star Trek/Planet of the Apes Comic Crossover
By: T'Bonz on Sep 16

Trek 3 Shooting Next Spring?
By: T'Bonz on Sep 16

Star Trek: Alien Domain Game Announced
By: T'Bonz on Sep 15

Red Shirt Diaries Episode Three
By: T'Bonz on Sep 15

Made Out Of Mudd Photonovel
By: T'Bonz on Sep 15

Takei Has Growth Removed
By: T'Bonz on Sep 15

Retro Review: Tears of the Prophets
By: Michelle on Sep 12


Welcome! The Trek BBS is the number one place to chat about Star Trek with like-minded fans. Please login to see our full range of forums as well as the ability to send and receive private messages, track your favourite topics and of course join in the discussions.

If you are a new visitor, join us for free. If you are an existing member please login below. Note: for members who joined under our old messageboard system, please login with your display name not your login name.


Go Back   The Trek BBS > Welcome to the Trek BBS! > General Trek Discussion

General Trek Discussion Trek TV and cinema subjects not related to any specific series or movie.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old January 13 2013, 02:41 AM   #31
Greg Cox
Vice Admiral
 
Location: Oxford, PA
Re: popular culture?

Nerys Myk wrote: View Post
Greg Cox wrote: View Post
Indeed, according to "Amok Time," Spock had already become something of a living legend on Vulcan, which is why T'Pring did not want to marry him. Guess she didn't want the spotlight of being the wife of a celebrity!
She could go on the the Real Housewives of ShiKahr.
Hah!

Forget T'Pring. Lwaxana Troi certainly acted like a celebrity--and would be reality-show gold!
__________________
www.gregcox-author.com
Greg Cox is online now   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2013, 02:58 AM   #32
Gary7
Rear Admiral
 
Gary7's Avatar
 
Location: Near Manhattan ··· in an alternate reality
Re: popular culture?

I distinctly remember the bridge of the Enterprise NCC-1701B in Generations, when Captain Kirk entered. Captain Harriman said "I just want you to know how excited we all are to have a group of living legends with us on our maiden voyage." And the video journalists certainly behaved in kind, sticking the cameras in the face of Kirk at pivotal moments. Kirk certainly seemed like a celebrity there.
__________________
Remembering Ensign Mallory.
Gary7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2013, 11:17 AM   #33
King Daniel Into Darkness
Admiral
 
King Daniel Into Darkness's Avatar
 
Location: England again
Re: popular culture?

According to Peter David's New Frontier novels, both Kirk and Spock puplished their memoirs after leaving Starfleet. I'd love to read those! (hint, hint, Pocket Books)

The Enterprise-B's Captain Harriman read about Kirk's missions in grade school. And the NX-01 Enterprise crew were doing lots of silly PR work in early episodes (photos of Archer in the captain's chair, making recordings for school kids, Archer writing a foreward for someone's book etc), so these people are somewhat in the public eye.
__________________
Star Trek Imponderables, fun mashups of Trek's biggest continuity errors! Ep1, Ep2 and Ep3
King Daniel Into Darkness is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2013, 06:08 PM   #34
WillsBabe
Vice Admiral
 
WillsBabe's Avatar
 
Re: popular culture?

JirinPanthosa wrote: View Post
Maybe Data forgot to mention, after 2040 people got their entertainment solely from the internet.

I think in 1987 television was considered strictly light entertainment, there was nothing like Sopranos or Breaking Bad, there were mostly network sitcoms and procedurals. So saying we got tired of that is just an extension of saying we stopped caring about frivolous distractions.
Are you saying that Breaking Bad and The Sopronos aren't frivolous distractions? TV these days is no less "frivilous" than it was back then, don't kid yourself.
__________________



WillsBabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 13 2013, 06:51 PM   #35
T'Girl
Vice Admiral
 
T'Girl's Avatar
 
Re: popular culture?

King Daniel wrote: View Post
According to Peter David's New Frontier novels, both Kirk and Spock puplished their memoirs after leaving Starfleet. I'd love to read those! (hint, hint, Pocket Books)
Foster's adaptations of the animated series were supposedly excerpts from Admiral Kirk's memoirs.

Last edited by T'Girl; January 13 2013 at 07:04 PM.
T'Girl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 14 2013, 10:04 AM   #36
Arpy
Rear Admiral
 
Re: popular culture?

I wonder if there aren't psychiatric disorders for holosuite...not addiction...psychosis? Where one creates so many more interesting worlds in the holosuites, ones very close to the real one but skewed every so slightly wherein their life is happier, that they lose touch with what's the real world and what's their own concoction. I imagine it might be something like living in a Philip K. Dick novel. What if Deckard was a human in a holosuite thinking he was an android fooling himself that he was a human? Come to think of it...TNG's "Frame of Mind"'s not that far off.
Arpy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 15 2013, 01:27 AM   #37
TheGoodNews
Lieutenant Commander
 
Re: popular culture?

"The question of the use of technological means, in everyday life and elsewhere, is a political question. Out of all the potential technical means, those that actually get implemented are selected in accordance with the goal of maintaining the rule of a particular class. When one imagines a future such as that presented in science-fiction, in which interstellar adventures coexist with a terrestrial everyday life kept in the same old material poverty and archaic morality, this implies precisely that there is still a class of specialized rulers maintaining the proletarian masses of the factories and offices in their service; and that the interstellar adventures are nothing but the particular enterprise chosen by those rulers, the way they have found to develop their irrational economy, the pinnacle of specialized activity.

.....

For classical capitalism, wasted time was time that was not devoted to production, accumulation, saving. The secular morality taught in bourgeois schools has instilled this rule of life. But it so happens that by an unexpected turn of events modern capitalism needs to increase consumption and "raise the standard of living" (bearing in mind that that expression is completely meaningless). Since at the same time production conditions, compartmentalized and clocked to the extreme, have become indefensible, the new morality already being conveyed in advertising, propaganda and all the forms of the dominant spectacle now frankly admits that wasted time is the time spent at work, the only purpose of which is earn enough to enable one to buy rest, consumption and entertainments -- a daily passivity manufactured and controlled by capitalism.

If we now consider the artificiality of the consumer needs prefabricated and ceaselessly stimulated by modern industry -- if we recognize the emptiness of leisure activities and the impossibility of rest -- we can pose the question more realistically: What would not be wasted time? Or to put it another way, the development of a society of abundance should lead to an abundance of what?"

Conscious Changes in Every Day Life by GuyDebord May 1961.

Roddenberry must've taken notes. But a lot of writers have infrequently contradicted what Roddenberry presented in the series. Probably through their own discretion due to time constraints and fear of alienating the viewers by making things too unfamiliar or complicated. At least he got William Shatner to kiss Nichelle Nichols on prime time.

"We've eliminated hunger, want, the need for possessions. We've grown out of our infancy." Capt. Picard.
TheGoodNews is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 15 2013, 03:31 AM   #38
T'Girl
Vice Admiral
 
T'Girl's Avatar
 
Re: popular culture?

TheGoodNews wrote: View Post
"The question of the use of technological means, in everyday life and elsewhere, is a political question.
More likely a question of personal desire, market forces and consumer safety.

"We've eliminated hunger, want, the need for possessions. We've grown out of our infancy." Capt. Picard.
This is the most foolish and arrogant thing that ever came out of Picard's mouth. They still have personal possessions. They still exhibit wants.
T'Girl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 15 2013, 03:34 AM   #39
robau
Lieutenant Commander
 
robau's Avatar
 
Re: popular culture?

They still have possessions but they aren't treated as a need. There is no Black Friday in the Utopia where a mass of humanity shove each other for cheap cellphones.
robau is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 15 2013, 03:40 AM   #40
Mr. Laser Beam
Fleet Admiral
 
Mr. Laser Beam's Avatar
 
Location: The visitor's bullpen
View Mr. Laser Beam's Twitter Profile
Re: popular culture?

Picard was probably just bullshitting Lily for her own "good".
__________________
It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion. It is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed, the hands acquire shakes, the shakes become a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.
Mr. Laser Beam is online now   Reply With Quote
Old January 15 2013, 05:26 AM   #41
TheGoodNews
Lieutenant Commander
 
Re: popular culture?

T'Girl wrote: View Post
TheGoodNews wrote: View Post
"The question of the use of technological means, in everyday life and elsewhere, is a political question.
More likely a question of personal desire, market forces and consumer safety.

I think what Mr. Debord was getting at is that more often than not technology that makes it to the producers and consumers via the market or other means doesn't upset the social and economic order much. Otherwise it would either be suppressed or not even developed to begin with. Planned obsolescence & artificial scarcity are methods used to keep things in place. The exception and "contradiction" in the system is when a development promises enormous surplus value or strategic advantage despite possible paradigmatic shifts to society. Sort of a cost-benefit analysis which put us in the post-industrial age. Think of the internet, a/c current or even super-injection moulding which greatly reduced costs for both the producers and the consumers.

"We've eliminated hunger, want, the need for possessions. We've grown out of our infancy." Capt. Picard.
This is the most foolish and arrogant thing that ever came out of Picard's mouth. They still have personal possessions. They still exhibit wants.
Again, think in terms of Economic Theory. "Possessions" doesn't refer to small, petty personal items but capital: stocks, bonds, real estate, factories, warehouses, natural & human resources, companies, money and the competitive drive to acquire them. Same applies to "want." "Want" on the sociological/economic scale not simply that somebody wants candy or to go to the movies or the beach.
TheGoodNews is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 15 2013, 06:44 AM   #42
mos6507
Captain
 
mos6507's Avatar
 
Re: popular culture?

One of the most cringe-worthy aspects of The Phantom Menace was the two-heded announcer doing the play by play of the pod races. There is something about mass-media in futuristic stories that seems too, I dunno, self-reflexive? I mean, you're already watching a movie or a TV show. If your futuristic characters watch movies or TV shows, it can't help but seem too modern-day. It works sometimes, like in THX-1138 or Idiocracy, but I don't think it would work for Star Trek. I'm sure there is "news" in the Trek universe, as well as some degree of high-art (like the traveling theater companies) but not the equivalent of a 24th century COPS or American Idol.
__________________
Fem Trekz on Facebook
mos6507 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 15 2013, 04:17 PM   #43
Greg Cox
Vice Admiral
 
Location: Oxford, PA
Re: popular culture?

You know, in retrospect, it seems odd that we never saw any reporters on TOS. We had lawyers, con men, even mail-order brides . . . but no irreverent, muckraking reporters?
__________________
www.gregcox-author.com
Greg Cox is online now   Reply With Quote
Old January 15 2013, 04:24 PM   #44
Gov Kodos
Admiral
 
Gov Kodos's Avatar
 
Location: Gov Kodos Regretably far from Boston
Re: popular culture?

One would think the trial of a highly decorated ship's captain would bring one. Or the next Miracle Computer from the Federation's Technology Wunderkind would raise a bit of news interest.
__________________
We are quicksilver, a fleeting shadow, a distant sound... our home has no boundaries beyond which we cannot pass. We live in music, in a flash of color... we live on the wind and in the sparkle of a star! Endora, Bewitched
Gov Kodos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 15 2013, 04:50 PM   #45
Deckerd
Fleet Arse
 
Deckerd's Avatar
 
Location: the Frozen Wastes
Re: popular culture?

mos6507 wrote: View Post
One of the most cringe-worthy aspects of The Phantom Menace was the two-heded announcer doing the play by play of the pod races. There is something about mass-media in futuristic stories that seems too, I dunno, self-reflexive? I mean, you're already watching a movie or a TV show. If your futuristic characters watch movies or TV shows, it can't help but seem too modern-day. It works sometimes, like in THX-1138 or Idiocracy, but I don't think it would work for Star Trek. I'm sure there is "news" in the Trek universe, as well as some degree of high-art (like the traveling theater companies) but not the equivalent of a 24th century COPS or American Idol.
The Fifth Element got it right. Both high and lowbrow celebrity.

ST didn't even attempt to allude to popular culture aside from some 60s music played by people dressed in tinfoil suits in the original series.
__________________
They couldn't hit an elephant at this distance.
Deckerd is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:44 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
FireFox 2+ or Internet Explorer 7+ highly recommended.