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Old January 14 2013, 10:03 AM   #46
rhubarbodendron
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Location: milky way, outer spiral arm, Sol 3
Re: Things old ladies do...

those nettles and a bit of ricotta, garlic and nutmeg also make a yummy filling for ravioli

The village on the roof is pretty cool indeed Only the moving stairs down in the shopping center are a bit loud and create a very low frequency hum (borderline to a vibration) that can be rather unnerving. Coincidentially, I have a tinnitus at almost the same frequenc so that I have 30 years of training in ignoring that hum/vibration
My penthouse is on top of the delivery area and the waste press, so that it's a bit loud during the day, but between 21:30 and 6:00 it is very quiet. And right under my terrace there's a sweets and tea shop
My neighbours are very nice, too. There's a student community to my left - they give me a 48 hour warning when they party and actually do turn the noise down when I ask them to! - and a gay guy in his late 30s to my right who is an absolute darling. Around the corner, facing my terrace, live an elderly lady and an old couple who all are very quiet and friendly.
Beyond them are two courtyards with students, an Asian family who runs a restaurant in the mall, two young families with small children and a rather nice young couple. All together we are about 30 people.

Fünen as we call Fyn sounds interesting. I've always wanted to go there and to the Dutch islands. Maybe I can combine both one day. What time of the year do you have the least tourists?
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Old January 14 2013, 03:02 PM   #47
maclaus
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Re: Things old ladies do...

*points to blog link in sig*

I'm from a long line of needlewomen on my mother's side of the family, though I stick mostly to knitting and crocheting, along with cross-stitch. I have a sewing machine, but I can only do basic stuff with it. As others have mentioned, making your own clothes is no longer as frugal, as good-quality materials and yarns are expensive, so I'm reluctant to buy material only to destroy it. Still, if I want to improve my sewing skills I must take the plunge.

I took up cooking in earnest once my children were old enough not to need constant supervision and I could withdraw to the kitchen. My mother was an excellent cook, but she wasn't always keen on cooking. A few years ago I started making my own bread, and I'm about to try making marmalade for the first time. One of my brothers is a professional chef, and I've learned from him over the years as well. I'm adventurous in the kitchen, which means there have been several times when I've spent hours on a dish only for us to end up eating peanut butter sandwiches because something went horribly, horribly wrong.

My daughter's been knitting a garter stitch scarf for the past five years (!), but neither of my sons are interested in learning any needlework skills. Still, I'm going to make sure that every one of my kids can cook a meal, darn a sock and sew on a button before they leave home. I'll happily knit afghans and socks for them for as long as I can, but they can do their own basic sewing repairs, thankyouverymuch.
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Old January 14 2013, 04:59 PM   #48
rhubarbodendron
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Re: Things old ladies do...

thanks for pointing the link out to me. I love your current avatar!

In my family we all are rather multi-talented: my mom (formerly a teacher for domestic economy, cooking and needlework) is a very good mason, my brother is a wizzard with the sewing machine and recently develpoped a talent for plumbing, my sister is an excellent motorbike mechanic and is famous for her Panna Cotta while I repair TVs, knit my own sweaters and occasionally sew a blouse or tat a nice collar or a few yards of lace. When my mom was in hospital for a few months, my dad took cooing lessons with a friend of his who owns an Italian restaurant. He's also a pretty good gardener and electrician.
We keep joking that apart from gravedigging and midwifing our clan is pretty independent.

The trick is that when we were small, our parents wouldn't repair things for us but say: there's the tool box / the sewing kit - give it a try. When it wouldn't work first time, they'd help us but we'd still do most of the work ourselves. This way we developed a certain confidence and started trying out other things as well.

For my 18th birthday I got a soldering iron =) I still have it and use it quite regularly (like tonight: my radio alarm clock needs a new antenna wire)


Repairing things is not exactly something old ladies would do, but it's also a dying art.
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Old January 15 2013, 07:37 AM   #49
TorontoTrekker
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Re: Things old ladies do...

Actually, I know a lot of people in the local science fiction community who sew or knit. And they're not even all costumers, though a large number are.

Baking and preserving is also not uncommon in fandom. Maybe we geeks are more prone to trying unusual hobbies?

Mr. Laser Beam wrote: View Post
Bridge.
ORLY? Take a look at the bottom right hand corner of page 2 of this PDF - you might see a name that belongs to, oh, me.

73rd Summer North American Bridge Championships daily newsletter, issue #7

There are plenty of clubs around, and tournaments pretty much every weekend. I doubt that newspapers would continue to run a daily column if it weren't reasonably popular - they could sell the space for advertising, after all. Also, the Toronto Star used to (I don't know if they still do) print a list of all the local tournament winners every week. It took up about half a page.

Now, sure, the average age of bridge players tends to skew to somewhere above 50, but every so often there's an influx of younger players. (I was part of one such influx in the early 90s, when I moved back to Toronto from university. I'd learned the game there, as it was impossible to walk into the lounge in the Math building and not find a game going on.)
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Old January 15 2013, 08:26 AM   #50
rhubarbodendron
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Re: Things old ladies do...

TorontoTrekker wrote: View Post
Maybe we geeks are more prone to trying unusual hobbies?
Or maybe we spend so much money on cons and fan stuff that we have to save up a bit on other things.
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Old January 15 2013, 08:53 PM   #51
maclaus
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Re: Things old ladies do...

Perhaps a love of sci-fi is linked with an active imagination and/or broad-mindedness, which, in turn, is linked to creativity.
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Old January 16 2013, 12:59 AM   #52
KimMH
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Re: Things old ladies do...

macloudt wrote: View Post
*points to blog link in sig*

I'm from a long line of needlewomen on my mother's side of the family, though I stick mostly to knitting and crocheting, along with cross-stitch. I have a sewing machine, but I can only do basic stuff with it. As others have mentioned, making your own clothes is no longer as frugal, as good-quality materials and yarns are expensive, so I'm reluctant to buy material only to destroy it. Still, if I want to improve my sewing skills I must take the plunge.

I took up cooking in earnest once my children were old enough not to need constant supervision and I could withdraw to the kitchen. My mother was an excellent cook, but she wasn't always keen on cooking. A few years ago I started making my own bread, and I'm about to try making marmalade for the first time. One of my brothers is a professional chef, and I've learned from him over the years as well. I'm adventurous in the kitchen, which means there have been several times when I've spent hours on a dish only for us to end up eating peanut butter sandwiches because something went horribly, horribly wrong.

My daughter's been knitting a garter stitch scarf for the past five years (!), but neither of my sons are interested in learning any needlework skills. Still, I'm going to make sure that every one of my kids can cook a meal, darn a sock and sew on a button before they leave home. I'll happily knit afghans and socks for them for as long as I can, but they can do their own basic sewing repairs, thankyouverymuch.
macloudt wrote: View Post
Perhaps a love of sci-fi is linked with an active imagination and/or broad-mindedness, which, in turn, is linked to creativity.
How do I love thee? Above are only two reasons!

I knit andsew, crochet not so much, but I'm hopeless in the kitchen. Always a new frontier( after guitar and karate lessons)!
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Old January 16 2013, 11:30 PM   #53
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Re: Things old ladies do...

This doesnt bother me that much, because though I would personally miss certain things from past, as human civilization(s) lose old skills they tend to acquire new ones, and usually things the old generations wouldn't dream of being able to do.

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Old January 17 2013, 01:35 PM   #54
rhubarbodendron
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Re: Things old ladies do...

Rama, is that you in your avatar? You have an incredible resemblance to my brother!

I agree about many new things being exciting and previousely unimaginable, the problem is just that many of the really good old things get lost in that process. It'd be perfect if we could have both.
For example: I have a 100 year old item that you put on top of a pot's lid and clamp it down under the handles. It holds the lid closed very tightly and thus shortens the cooking duration considerably. It's the predecessor of those modern steam pots with the valve in the lid (of which I am always a bit scared). It's such a handy device and nobody makes them anymore
I'll take a photo tonight and post it here.
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Old January 17 2013, 09:27 PM   #55
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Re: Things old ladies do...

I think culture is an organic thing that is capable of expanding to fit everything we think of. Why not keep all the good elements and do our best to whittle away the worst? Hand made articles that express love will never go out of style or no longer have a place. Those things may change over time is all. Your Bubbe knits you a sweater? Reciprocate and help her set up her email so she can keep in touch with you and her friends.

I guess handmade or hand crafted things are an investment of time which is an element of all healthy relationship building.
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Old January 17 2013, 10:27 PM   #56
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Re: Things old ladies do...

Years ago I forced myself to knit for this very reason. I tried to crochet but could never get the knack. My father has these table cloths that were tatted. It's a skill that has all but died out. These table clothes reach the floor of a rather big imposing old dining room table. I can't even fathom how long it took to make them.

My sister in law is Croatian and it used to be whenever we went to a Croatian event in town there would be these tiny little intricate cake pastries made of many layers of chocolate and vanilla cake. The "ladies at the church" used to make them. I always asked the younger generations if they knew how to make them and none of them did. Last time I went to a Croatian wedding there were none of those little cakes
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Old January 17 2013, 11:18 PM   #57
propita
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Re: Things old ladies do...

Rhubarbodendron wrote: View Post
Rama, is that you in your avatar? You have an incredible resemblance to my brother!

I agree about many new things being exciting and previousely unimaginable, the problem is just that many of the really good old things get lost in that process. It'd be perfect if we could have both.
For example: I have a 100 year old item that you put on top of a pot's lid and clamp it down under the handles. It holds the lid closed very tightly and thus shortens the cooking duration considerably. It's the predecessor of those modern steam pots with the valve in the lid (of which I am always a bit scared). It's such a handy device and nobody makes them anymore
I'll take a photo tonight and post it here.
So it's similar to a pressure cooker, but not a pressure cooker?

One could buy a cast iron pot with lid. Saw it on amazon just today. People use it for cooking, stewing, braising, and baking. If I didn't have a ceramic range top, I'd get one. Gotta be careful with those ceramic tops. Next time, I'll get a gas range with electric oven combo--heavy pots are no problem.
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Old January 17 2013, 11:26 PM   #58
Peach Wookiee
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Re: Things old ladies do...

I learned to crochet on my own while Grandma was still around. I learned to quilt when I had no great-grandmother to teach me (they were long gone by the time I was old enough to learn). Cooking was one thing my dad's mom was glad to teach me, though she didn't want me to learn certain recipes. Grandma was rather vain about her cooking skills.
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Old January 18 2013, 01:22 PM   #59
rhubarbodendron
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Re: Things old ladies do...

propita wrote: View Post
So it's similar to a pressure cooker, but not a pressure cooker?
Not exactly. The effect is similar to a pressure cooker, but the device itself is something completely different. It's basically just a heavy clamp that holds the lid on a pot down extremely tightly. This way the pressure builds up much higher than in a normal pot and that in turn gets a cooking result similar to a pressure cooker.
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Old January 19 2013, 04:31 AM   #60
T'Grinch
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Re: Things old ladies do...

This old lady is trying to become a better sewer. My first shirt, made after a pattern-fitting class was taken. (I can sew and would consider myself at an intermediate level, but I wanted to learn how to make nicer things.)

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