RSS iconTwitter iconFacebook icon

The Trek BBS title image

The Trek BBS statistics

Threads: 135,792
Posts: 5,217,836
Members: 24,222
Currently online: 703
Newest member: smudgietoo

TrekToday headlines

Q Meets NuTrek Crew
By: T'Bonz on Apr 18

Pine In Talks For Drama
By: T'Bonz on Apr 18

New X-Men: Days of Future Past Trailer
By: T'Bonz on Apr 17

Nimoy to Receive Award
By: T'Bonz on Apr 17

Star Trek Special: Flesh and Stone Comic
By: T'Bonz on Apr 16

These Are The Voyages TOS Season Two Book Review
By: T'Bonz on Apr 16

Kirk’s Well Wishes To Kirk
By: T'Bonz on Apr 15

Quinto In New Starz Series
By: T'Bonz on Apr 15

Star Trek: Horizon Film
By: T'Bonz on Apr 14

Star Trek: Fleet Captains Game Expansion
By: T'Bonz on Apr 14


Welcome! The Trek BBS is the number one place to chat about Star Trek with like-minded fans. Please login to see our full range of forums as well as the ability to send and receive private messages, track your favourite topics and of course join in the discussions.

If you are a new visitor, join us for free. If you are an existing member please login below. Note: for members who joined under our old messageboard system, please login with your display name not your login name.


Go Back   The Trek BBS > Misc. Star Trek > Trek Tech

Trek Tech Pass me the quantum flux regulator, will you?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old January 2 2013, 04:27 AM   #16
Christopher
Writer
 
Christopher's Avatar
 
Re: If hydrogen wasn't the lightest element?

Darkwing wrote: View Post
Poul Anderson says in one of the Flandry novels that there are a huge number of rogue planets (planets not in a star system). That'd account for some of the missing matter.
Well, Anderson may have made a lucky guess, but at the time he had no was of knowing that, so it doesn't make much sense to cite that as your evidence for the idea.

However, there's no way that would be enough to account for the majority of the missing mass. If it were baryonic matter, there'd be a lot more light extinction from all the clutter in between the stars.


As for making the replicators not work, they're what the Reeves'Stevens' called transtator tech - based on subspace effects, like the shields, warp drive, transporter, etc.
The term "transtator" was introduced, and established as "the basis for every important piece of equipment that we have" (in Spock's words), in the TOS episode "A Piece of the Action" by David P. Harmon and Gene L. Coon.
__________________
Christopher L. Bennett Homepage -- Site update 4/8/14 including annotations for Rise of the Federation: Tower of Babel

Written Worlds -- My blog
Christopher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 2 2013, 10:08 PM   #17
Darkwing
Commodore
 
Location: This dry land thing is too wierd!
Re: If hydrogen wasn't the lightest element?

Christopher wrote: View Post
Well, Anderson may have made a lucky guess, but at the time he had no was of knowing that, so it doesn't make much sense to cite that as your evidence for the idea.
Excuse me? Did I say it was evidence? I credited the source where I read the idea. If I were a scientist, I'd need evidence. This wasn't a theory, just an idea that, given some research, could plausibly become the basis of one.

[/QUOTE]However, there's no way that would be enough to account for the majority of the missing mass. If it were baryonic matter, there'd be a lot more light extinction from all the clutter in between the stars.[/QUOTE] Didn't say it was, just that it potentially explains some of it.


The term "transtator" was introduced, and established as "the basis for every important piece of equipment that we have" (in Spock's words), in the TOS episode "A Piece of the Action" by David P. Harmon and Gene L. Coon.
Yeah, I couldn't remember for certain if there was a reference on the show, but did remember the Reeves'Stevens' use of it. Still, if there's some change in physics that throws the replicators off, it'll throw off anything using transtators, IMO.
__________________
If you don’t drink the kool-aid, you’re a baaad person - Rev Jim Jones
Almond kool-aid, anyone? Or do you prefer pudding?- Darkwing
Darkwing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 4 2013, 10:00 PM   #18
Crazy Eddie
Rear Admiral
 
Crazy Eddie's Avatar
 
Location: I'm in your ___, ___ing your ___
Re: If hydrogen wasn't the lightest element?

Christopher wrote: View Post
However, there's no way that would be enough to account for the majority of the missing mass. If it were baryonic matter, there'd be a lot more light extinction from all the clutter in between the stars.
That's not even true for planets ORBITING stars, why would you expect it to be true of large cold planets in interstellar space?

Excitation is detectable for some types of matter in a diffuse state -- atomic hydrogen, for example -- which can be detected as it receives and then sheds an electron/photon from nearby energy sources. Excitation in a planetary atmosphere is harder to detect since 1) the planet itself re-absorbs alot of that energy and 2) it is a relatively small amount of energy being emitted from a VERY small point in distant space, below the resolution of most telescopes.

Not neccesarily brown dwarfs, but jupiter or saturn-mass rogue planets wandering the galaxy is likely to be a fairly common situation, and some of those may be double or tripple planet formations orbiting each other. This would, of course, imply that most of the time a collapsing cloud of gas and dust would not achieve anywhere near enough density or temperature to actually fuse elements; even below brown dwarfs, there would be whole solar systems that form around a couple of large gas giants with no star to speak of. It's even possible that these cases are the vast majority of planetary systems in the galaxy and that they remain undetected only because our equipment for measuring gravitational lensing isn't precise enough to detect them.
__________________
The Complete Illustrated Guide to Starfleet - Online Now!
Crazy Eddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 5 2013, 09:31 PM   #19
publiusr
Commodore
 
Re: If hydrogen wasn't the lightest element?

newtype_alpha wrote: View Post

Excitation is detectable for some types of matter in a diffuse state -- atomic hydrogen, for example.
Then too, there is this:

Negative temperature may also have implications for cosmology. Dark energy, thought to explain the accelerating expansion of the universe, exerts negative pressure, which suggests it might have negative temperature – Schneider is currently discussing the idea with cosmologists.


http://nextbigfuture.com/2013/01/neg...ature-for.html
publiusr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 7 2013, 03:02 AM   #20
Crazy Eddie
Rear Admiral
 
Crazy Eddie's Avatar
 
Location: I'm in your ___, ___ing your ___
Re: If hydrogen wasn't the lightest element?

^ Dark matter is at least a placeholder for an undetected datapoint that could be anything from non-baryonic matter to a really poor understanding of how gravity really works.

Dark energy is a cosmological ass-pull intended to rescue a theory that has entirely ceased to make sense.
__________________
The Complete Illustrated Guide to Starfleet - Online Now!
Crazy Eddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:45 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
FireFox 2+ or Internet Explorer 7+ highly recommended.