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Go Back   The Trek BBS > Misc. Star Trek > Trek Tech

Trek Tech Pass me the quantum flux regulator, will you?

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Old November 7 2012, 05:37 PM   #16
Timo
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Re: Transporter, how's they work?

It does seem that at least the part about there being two modes runs contrary to the actual plotlines. In the early episode "Dagger of the Mind", transporters were used for beaming what was supposed to be just cargo, but a live stowaway survived the process easily enough. In "Datalore", a cargo transporter moved Lore without killing him, despite the android supposedly being as intricate a piece of material as a human being is, and despite there being no story logic in specifically setting that transporter on "life-friendly" mode.

Also, many a plotline involves substances too delicate to be transported, while the transporting of humanoids basically never presents any problems. The few times there is a problem, it's deliberately caused by the resisting transportee ("The Hunted") or involves a major hardware failure ("Body Parts", "Our Man Bashir").

Perhaps a low-resolution mode does exist, but is very seldom used, and never as the default for cargo units. Or perhaps there only exists one resolution for the transporter to begin with - infinite resolution, as dictated by the pseudo-physics involved, and not subject to any sort of adjustment.

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Old November 9 2012, 12:13 AM   #17
-Brett-
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Re: Transporter, how's they work?

Brainsucker wrote: View Post
I always bothered with this, but what transporter do actually? Are they just transferring human cells from one place to another, or clone them?
I've heard the cloning theory before, and I can't imagine anyone with two working brain cells using the thing if that was known to be the case.

"Enlightened" or not, who is going to commit suicide just to avoid putting extra miles on the shuttlecraft?
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Old November 9 2012, 12:55 AM   #18
Chemahkuu
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Re: Transporter, how's they work?

Can I just say that in Our Man Bashir they made a point of saying they had to erase nearly every bit of data on every computer aboard the station, it's cores, etc down to the very minimal machine code for keeping the life support working just to barely fit 5 patterns.

An entire station running computer technology throughout with that kind of storage having to be emptied nearly 100% to fit their base patterns, not necessarily their conciousness which seemed to exist on the holodeck in some other way.

That is not practical, they couldn't figure out how it even happened or worked to even try repeat it and on a starship would have been disasterous as there would have been nowhere near enough storage or possibly power.

So obvioulsy whatever way transporters normally work, they do not store anywhere near as much information on each individual, otherwise the mass transporter evacuations we've seen would be impossible.
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Old November 9 2012, 01:02 AM   #19
KamenRiderBlade
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Re: Transporter, how's they work?

Chrysalis wrote: View Post
Can I just say that in Our Man Bashir they made a point of saying they had to erase nearly every bit of data on every computer aboard the station, it's cores, etc down to the very minimal machine code for keeping the life support working just to barely fit 5 patterns.

An entire station running computer technology throughout with that kind of storage having to be emptied nearly 100% to fit their base patterns, not necessarily their conciousness which seemed to exist on the holodeck in some other way.

That is not practical, they couldn't figure out how it even happened or worked to even try repeat it and on a starship would have been disasterous as there would have been nowhere near enough storage or possibly power.

So obvioulsy whatever way transporters normally work, they do not store anywhere near as much information on each individual, otherwise the mass transporter evacuations we've seen would be impossible.
DS9 is not a state of the art Starbase like what usually resides in UFP territory. DS9 was a ore processing plant before getting renovated. I doubt they needed that much computing power for everything in the facility.

Voyager on the other hand was able to expand their transporter buffer capacity to beam over the entire crew of a Klingon Starship of over a 100 people in a few seconds.

So I think it's more a limitation of computing power, computing memory, and pattern buffer storage capacity.
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Old November 9 2012, 11:13 AM   #20
Timo
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Re: Transporter, how's they work?

Again, please note that the bodies of those five people were stored in a transporter-based system, namely Quark's holosystem. The station computers only held the five brain patterns.

In contrast, the transporter system of the Voyager was able to hold a great number of "entire" people in the buffer for much longer than mere minutes in "Counterpoint". It consumed a lot of power, resulted in cumulative damage, and hit time limits at what looked like anything between fifteen minutes and two hours, but it did work. And with a bit of ingenuity, a single person could be held in the buffer (or perhaps cycled in and out) for seven decades in "Relics", making him immune to the passage of time.

So storage in pure data form is actually something of a last last resort, when the transporter tech itself can achieve similar results more conveniently by using the "patterns in buffer" approach. Computing would not appear to be involved in any major way in the storage of transporter patterns in buffer...

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Old November 9 2012, 04:59 PM   #21
Chemahkuu
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Re: Transporter, how's they work?

Which would support the "phase" idea, that the computer only needs to be 'reminded' constantly that it's holding something in stasis, a constantly running program of some amount of processing power, but not the raw data of the entire person.
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Old November 21 2012, 01:20 AM   #22
Pauln6
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Re: Transporter, how's they work?

Despite the loose use of language, I think the transporters must be phasing the original matter, quantum-linking the original atoms with energy that is swapped in from whatever dimension the individuals are being phased into. The 'energy' is then locked into an annular confinement beam and sent via subspace to the destination. When the confinement beam is released, the original matter naturally reverts from its dimensional state, which is how the matter can be re-assembled despite not having transporter equipment at the destination.

Some energy inevitably leaks away every time someone is beamed so when beaming back to the ship the computer compares the current scan with the buffer scan and replicates matter to replace any that is missing. This gets around a lot of transporter story issues: it prevents cloning and reparation of serious injuries (replicated cells are essentially dead matter without a live host to house them); it explains why transporter malfunctions like in TMP can kill (the quantum links get screwed up or too much energy leaks away so that you either materialise very wrongly or you can only get a largely replicated corpse back); transporter duplicates are possible only with weird malfunctions that allow a larger portion of replicated matter to still produce live beings; it is possible for genes to be filtered out by selectively deleting quantum links as long as the percentage of replicated replacement genes is not too high (good/evil Kirk or Tuvix, rascals).

It also adds in fun limitations - beaming to a series of unrelated locations over a short space of time without returning to your original destination could lead to cumulative cell damage as your 'leakage' is never repaired.

The main thing that does not make sense to me is how a ship can carry out a quantum scan from orbit to beam someone back without a localised quantum scanner. Communicators fulfill this function well but too many stories allow people to be beamed out even without communicators. It was a Pandora's box that should never have been opened.

Even stranger is the seriously long distance beaming of living matter in the NuUniverse. Even travelling in subspace is not instantaneous. It isn't clear what is maintaining the annular confinement beams at all, let alone for that long. In the comics, Scotty successfully transports a transportee's signal via standard, unmodified subspace communications relays that are only set up to transmit data. It would be nice if the modern writers could settle on some pretend physics and stick with it.
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