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Go Back   The Trek BBS > Star Trek Movies > Star Trek Movies I-X

Star Trek Movies I-X Discuss the first ten big screen outings in this forum!

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Old September 11 2012, 08:50 PM   #76
Captaindemotion
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

Imagining that it's 1979 and I'm in Paramount's marketing department and want to come up with a title that reflects TMP - or that just sounds good - I'd probably plump for one of the following:

Star Trek: The Movie

Star Trek: The Return

Star Trek: Enterprise

Star Trek: The Human Adventure

Star Trek: V'ger

Star Trek: Reunion

Star Trek: The Maker

Star Trek: In Thy Image

Star Trek: Destiny

Star Trek

Or, in the vein of the Airport sequels, Star Trek 1979 (it would've seemed really cool at the time!)
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Old September 11 2012, 10:16 PM   #77
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

^Interestingly, nearly half of those were eventually used for one thing or another.

Given the marketing concerns discussed above, the need to make it clear that this was a movie and not a TV show (since, remember, there had already been two Trek TV series by this point, including the animated one), I think they chose the right title. The Motion Picture is classier than The Movie would've been, conveying the sense of sophistication they were going for. In Thy Image or The Human Adventure could've worked if it hadn't been the first-ever movie, but since it was, I can understand why the need to specify that took precedence.
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Old September 11 2012, 10:25 PM   #78
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

Star Trek Returns
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Old September 12 2012, 01:08 AM   #79
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

2271: A Star Trek
Star Trek: The V'ger Incident
Star Trek: The Doomsday Machine Revisited
Star Trek: The Changeling Redux

TMP is still one of my favorite films. In 1979 I can remember seeing "Apocalypse Now", "Alien", and TMP. I enjoyed all 3 films then and I still do, thanks to Video Tape and DVD.


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Old September 12 2012, 01:12 AM   #80
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

Christopher wrote: View Post
I think what needs to be remembered is that TMP came along during a paradigm shift in the way SF film was done. People today look back on it as a generation whose view of SF cinema is defined by Star Wars and its successors, the trend of SF as action-driven roller-coaster rides. But TMP harkened back to the SF of the '60s and '70s, to films like 2001: A Space Odyssey and Silent Running. It wasn't about mile-a-minute excitement; it was about ideas and atmosphere and grandeur and sense of wonder. And it wasn't just SF; there were a number of films in other genres that weren't afraid of long, slow, contemplative passages that were about immersing the audience in the atmosphere of a scene. See films like Lawrence of Arabia, Dr. Zhivago, the works of Kubrick and Leone and Bergman, etc. This was part of the language of cinema in the era where most of Robert Wise's career fell. It can be hard to understand today when so many of us watch movies on DVD or our computers, but if you experience something like that on the big screen, with all distractions taken away, it's a far more immersive and effective experience.

So it wasn't that Wise's approach was wrong or inept; it was that he was following an older paradigm, one that audiences weren't as quick to embrace after Star Wars changed the rules (and not necessarily for the better). And I don't think that was a mistake. I think TMP is perhaps one of the last big statements of that particular paradigm, the swan song of a cinematic era. After all, TMP and The Black Hole, which came out only two weeks later, were the last American films to feature overtures in their theatrical releases, something that had been a common practice in earlier decades. TBH was also an exemplar of the older style of SF filmmaking, essentially a space-based remake of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, although showing some of the influence that Star Wars had on SF cinema.
Well said, and I agree. I think "Apocalypse Now" and "Alien" would also qualify as films done in that slow manner, which were also released in 1979.


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Old September 12 2012, 03:12 PM   #81
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

Star Trek: This is not your stupid-friends' Star Wars
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Old September 12 2012, 08:41 PM   #82
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

Christopher wrote: View Post
^Interestingly, nearly half of those were eventually used for one thing or another.
That did occur to me. Originality is not my strong point, though I still think that they would work for TMP.

Given the marketing concerns discussed above, the need to make it clear that this was a movie and not a TV show (since, remember, there had already been two Trek TV series by this point, including the animated one), I think they chose the right title. The Motion Picture is classier than The Movie would've been, conveying the sense of sophistication they were going for. In Thy Image or The Human Adventure could've worked if it hadn't been the first-ever movie, but since it was, I can understand why the need to specify that took precedence.
Yeah, I take your point about forgoing In Thy Image or The Human Adventure. I just find the phrase 'The Motion Picture' somewhat pompous and needlessly wordy.

To be fair, I appreciate that it was a different era and the term 'motion picture' was more commonly used then than it is now. But...it just doesn't work for me.
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Old September 12 2012, 08:44 PM   #83
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

Taking a riff from Spaceballs:

Star Trek: The Merchandising
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Old September 12 2012, 08:56 PM   #84
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

Captaindemotion wrote: View Post
I just find the phrase 'The Motion Picture' somewhat pompous and needlessly wordy.

To be fair, I appreciate that it was a different era and the term 'motion picture' was more commonly used then than it is now. But...it just doesn't work for me.
Well, look at it this way: it'd be weird to call it ST:TM instead of TMP. Then it would sound like it meant "trademark" or something.
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Old September 12 2012, 09:14 PM   #85
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

I wouldn't rename it, to be honest. I like the title. There, I said it.
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Old September 12 2012, 09:20 PM   #86
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

Christopher wrote: View Post
Captaindemotion wrote: View Post
I just find the phrase 'The Motion Picture' somewhat pompous and needlessly wordy.

To be fair, I appreciate that it was a different era and the term 'motion picture' was more commonly used then than it is now. But...it just doesn't work for me.
Well, look at it this way: it'd be weird to call it ST:TM instead of TMP. Then it would sound like it meant "trademark" or something.
I'm not saying I'm overly keen about 'The Movie' either. But it did work for Superman! But hey, horses for courses!
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Old September 13 2012, 07:49 AM   #87
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

Star Trek the Film
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Old September 16 2012, 09:04 AM   #88
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

KingDaniel wrote: View Post
Nooo, it just brought back a flood of memories. I loved that they remade it for Superman Returns.
Beat me to it. In the cinema, watching "Superman Returns", I had goosebumps from the nostalgia. Sadly, I came home and quickly got the feeling many people disliked the movie.
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Old September 21 2012, 04:18 PM   #89
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

Christopher wrote: View Post
Irishman wrote: View Post
Too many long scenes of the characters staring at nothing, and scenery-chewing by Kirk. Even the beauty shots of the new Enterprise, space office, drydock, Epsilon station, Vger and the Klingon ships were too drawn out. It almost felt like someone made the decision to linger on them to justify having spent the money on all those new models.

I would love to see someone take the Director's Edition (with its completed and updated FX) and edit it down to something more reasonable, and not be such a snore.
I think what needs to be remembered is that TMP came along during a paradigm shift in the way SF film was done. People today look back on it as a generation whose view of SF cinema is defined by Star Wars and its successors, the trend of SF as action-driven roller-coaster rides. But TMP harkened back to the SF of the '60s and '70s, to films like 2001: A Space Odyssey and Silent Running. It wasn't about mile-a-minute excitement; it was about ideas and atmosphere and grandeur and sense of wonder. And it wasn't just SF; there were a number of films in other genres that weren't afraid of long, slow, contemplative passages that were about immersing the audience in the atmosphere of a scene. See films like Lawrence of Arabia, Dr. Zhivago, the works of Kubrick and Leone and Bergman, etc. This was part of the language of cinema in the era where most of Robert Wise's career fell. It can be hard to understand today when so many of us watch movies on DVD or our computers, but if you experience something like that on the big screen, with all distractions taken away, it's a far more immersive and effective experience.

So it wasn't that Wise's approach was wrong or inept; it was that he was following an older paradigm, one that audiences weren't as quick to embrace after Star Wars changed the rules (and not necessarily for the better). And I don't think that was a mistake. I think TMP is perhaps one of the last big statements of that particular paradigm, the swan song of a cinematic era. After all, TMP and The Black Hole, which came out only two weeks later, were the last American films to feature overtures in their theatrical releases, something that had been a common practice in earlier decades. TBH was also an exemplar of the older style of SF filmmaking, essentially a space-based remake of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, although showing some of the influence that Star Wars had on SF cinema.
After re-watching the TMP Director's Edition with the commentary, I would have to revise my earlier statement to say more accurately that the fault lie with both Wise and Trumbull, with regard to the starship porn cuts, etc. Even Wise saw the need for reducing some of the scenes to run shorter. He said so, for crying out loud!

And as for those other examples, I have yet to speak with any classic film fan who complains about the pacing of TMP, who also complains about the pacing of those other films you cite - especially 2001!
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Old September 21 2012, 05:33 PM   #90
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Re: Rename The Motion Picture

Irishman wrote: View Post
After re-watching the TMP Director's Edition with the commentary, I would have to revise my earlier statement to say more accurately that the fault lie with both Wise and Trumbull, with regard to the starship porn cuts, etc. Even Wise saw the need for reducing some of the scenes to run shorter. He said so, for crying out loud!
If there's any "fault" to be assigned, it's with the distributors who insisted on an inflexible release date and therefore forced Wise to deliver an unfinished rough cut to theaters. The cut we saw included all the FX footage only because they hadn't had time to trim it down yet, to make all the editorial decisions about how much of it would best serve the film's overall pacing. Again, you're completely wrong to accuse the filmmakers of making bad or inept decisions. They weren't allowed to make the editorial decisions they wanted to make, because they were forced to deliver the film before it was ready. It was the only film in Wise's entire career that was released to theaters in a form he wasn't satisfied with. He even tried to convince the studio to let him finish editing the film properly and send out a final cut to replace the rough cut while it was still in theaters, but they refused to cough up the money to let him get the film right. He had to wait 22 years for the opportunity to complete the film.


And as for those other examples, I have yet to speak with any classic film fan who complains about the pacing of TMP, who also complains about the pacing of those other films you cite - especially 2001!
I think the pacing of TMP is fine, whereas 2001 is a crashing bore. Although that's probably because the slow parts of TMP have great music to listen to, while a lot of 2001 is just tedious silence. I've never liked the way Kubrick dealt with music.
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