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Star Trek - Original Series The one that started it all...

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Old February 9 2012, 04:50 PM   #16
AtoZ
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

Before somebody who knows better steps in and corrects me because this point may have been brought up elsewhere or sometime during the Bush years, consider the possibility that we saw two near duplicates of Engineering (the one without the metallic ladder and 2nd level in season 1) and the one with the metallic ladder and Scotty's perched office.

Also, in The Alternative Factor, we saw yet another variation of Engineering's extension as it applied to the ship, manned by a hot "blue shirt" with great legs. We didn't see the large set with the forced perspective, but it does gives us a notion that "Engineering" isn't limited to one location on the Enterprise.
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Old February 9 2012, 07:16 PM   #17
Merry Christmas
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

scotpens wrote: View Post
Curved corridors in a cigar-shaped outer hull
That's why the new movie Enterprise is over eight thousand feet long, lots of room for curving corridors in the engineering section. And a brewery too.

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Old February 10 2012, 12:33 AM   #18
jayrath
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

[QUOTE=scotpens;5784331]
Captain Tracy wrote: View Post
Submarine crews in today’s navies may remain underwater, isolated from the rest of humanity, for weeks or even months at a time. The interior arrangements of nuclear subs are designed for practicality and maximum use of available space. Curved corridors in a cigar-shaped outer hull would be tremendously wasteful of space.
We're talking about a five year mission, not "months." Anyway, a modern submarine is a straight pipe, divided into decks. It has to follow that form, to travel through water. But a ship in space, not bound to any aero- (or hydro) dynamic? And what wasted space in the 1701? We've already seen curved walls, curved ceilings, curved closets for heaven's sake.

Or are you suggesting that contemporary submarines not be tubes, but long blocks -- something like a massive 2x4, underwater? By your reasoning, that is the most "practical" design.
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Old February 10 2012, 01:21 AM   #19
Captain Tracy
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

[QUOTE=jayrath;5788243]
Captain Tracy wrote: View Post
Submarine crews in today’s navies may remain underwater, isolated from the rest of humanity, for weeks or even months at a time. The interior arrangements of nuclear subs are designed for practicality and maximum use of available space. Curved corridors in a cigar-shaped outer hull would be tremendously wasteful of space.
JAYRATH - That is not MY quote.

The author of that which you have assigned to me from the keyboard of SCOTPEN

Please check the origianl source and make the correction.

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Old February 10 2012, 01:30 AM   #20
A beaker full of death
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

I don't care what Jeffries said in later years, the shipboard conventions depicted in Star Trek were intended to be something the WWII-veteran tv-viewing public could understand and relate to. Space on board ship was at a premium (let alone on s SPACE SHIP). They wouldn't dick around with odd-shaped corridors for the hell of it.
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Old February 10 2012, 01:54 AM   #21
Santa Kang
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

A beaker full of death wrote: View Post
I don't care what Jeffries said in later years, the shipboard conventions depicted in Star Trek were intended to be something the WWII-veteran tv-viewing public could understand and relate to. Space on board ship was at a premium (let alone on s SPACE SHIP). They woulidn't dick around with odd-shaped corridors for the hell of it.
While I agree that the curves corridors were meant to indicate locations in the primary hull, I would hesitate to say the ship was designed to show space was at a premium.

The corridors were pretty wide and tall. Not unlike a hotel or apartment building. No ducking your head or turning sideways to pass.



Then there is the dance floor/engineering room.

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Old February 10 2012, 02:12 AM   #22
nightwind1
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

Mysterion wrote: View Post
I've just written off to them only having the one corridor set and gotten on with my life. Of course engineering is in the secondary hull.
Nope. I've always gone with Fraz Joseph's layout, with Engineering at the aft end of the Primary Hull.
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Old February 10 2012, 02:33 AM   #23
Olive, the Other Reindeer
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

jayrath wrote: View Post
We're talking about a five year mission, not "months."
But we assume no member of the crew was confined to the ship for the entire 5 years.

Or are you suggesting that contemporary submarines not be tubes, but long blocks -- something like a massive 2x4, underwater? By your reasoning, that is the most "practical" design.
Read my post again. Of course a submarine has to have a hydrodynamic shape. The Enterprise’s engineering hull is roughly cylindrical because it looks cool. I was talking about making the most efficient use of available space.

Captain Tracy wrote: View Post
TIP: You can always, by-in-large, tell the authenticity of a CAPTAIN TRACY post; as they, on-the-whole, will employ a high degree of accuracy with regard to: content, style, and punctuation - not to mention: wit, wisdom, and general 'snarkiness'.
The phrase is “by and large.”

Nerys Myk wrote: View Post
While I agree that the curves corridors were meant to indicate locations in the primary hull, I would hesitate to say the ship was designed to show space was at a premium.

The corridors were pretty wide and tall. Not unlike a hotel or apartment building. No ducking your head or turning sideways to pass.
They had to be roomy enough to accomodate a camera dolly, microphone boom, trailing cables and filming crew. No Steadicams in those days.
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Old February 10 2012, 04:48 AM   #24
Captain Tracy
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

Quite right! By-and-Large, it is! Who said you can't learn anything from STAR TREK,... ancient nautical terms ABOUND!

LOL!
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Old February 10 2012, 05:34 AM   #25
Santa Kang
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

scotpens wrote: View Post

Nerys Myk wrote: View Post
While I agree that the curves corridors were meant to indicate locations in the primary hull, I would hesitate to say the ship was designed to show space was at a premium.

The corridors were pretty wide and tall. Not unlike a hotel or apartment building. No ducking your head or turning sideways to pass.
They had to be roomy enough to accomodate a camera dolly, microphone boom, trailing cables and filming crew. No Steadicams in those days.
A fact I'm aware of.
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Old February 10 2012, 10:06 AM   #26
Mytran
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

However, the fact remains that the hallways were (and remained throughout later incarnations) 8 feet wide and at least 8 feet high. This is what appeared on our screens for 40 years. Even Franz Joseph (who took many liberties with the layout and design of rooms) kept to these dimensions.

As to the (in universe) reasons why - that's another matter entirely!
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Old February 10 2012, 10:08 AM   #27
Timo
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

"Engineering" isn't limited to one location on the Enterprise.
Indeed, it would be quite possible and relatively easy to fit something like six Engineering sets in the secondary hull, e.g. one at each end of a trio of longitudal shafts ("warp cores") that would tie to each other with those prominent angled tubes on the shaft walls. And each location could be symmetrically expanded so that the visible set would only represent the portside or starboard half of the whole. That would cover most of the variation in the (factually single) set seen during the run of the show, while still leaving much of the engineering hull empty.

Clearly, the one interpretation that is not plausible is that Engineering would consist only of that single set. It's said to be a maze where one could hide basically indefinitely, after all.

Timo Saloniemi
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Old February 10 2012, 12:31 PM   #28
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

The curved ceiling of the Engineering set clearly suggests it was located along the top of the secondary hull. This curvature is replicated in the films for the horizontal part of the warp core.
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Old February 10 2012, 02:33 PM   #29
Timo
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

...And, funnily enough, the TMP set also works best if we ignore the forced perspective for the back wall shaft and interpret it as being just as short as it really was. That way, the unfortunate corridor towards the bow (another poorly working matte) fits inside the secondary hull nicely enough.

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Old February 10 2012, 07:13 PM   #30
A beaker full of death
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

Captain Tracy wrote: View Post
Quite right! By-and-Large, it is! Who said you can't learn anything from STAR TREK,... ancient nautical terms ABOUND!

LOL!
It's funny. When I studied admiralty law the professor was this old salt with one arm. He told about how land lubbers would come aboard ship well versed in port vs. starboard, and the captain would just say "turn right!"
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