RSS iconTwitter iconFacebook icon

The Trek BBS title image

The Trek BBS statistics

Threads: 140,226
Posts: 5,438,162
Members: 24,957
Currently online: 563
Newest member: zanejc

TrekToday headlines

Cumberbatch In Wax
By: T'Bonz on Oct 24

Trek Screenwriter Washington D.C. Appearance
By: T'Bonz on Oct 23

Two Official Starships Collection Ships
By: T'Bonz on Oct 22

Pine In New Skit
By: T'Bonz on Oct 21

Stewart In Holiday Film
By: T'Bonz on Oct 21

The Red Shirt Diaries #8
By: T'Bonz on Oct 20

IDW Publishing January Comics
By: T'Bonz on Oct 20

Retro Review: Chrysalis
By: Michelle on Oct 18

The Next Generation Season Seven Blu-ray Details
By: T'Bonz on Oct 17

CBS Launches Streaming Service
By: T'Bonz on Oct 17


Welcome! The Trek BBS is the number one place to chat about Star Trek with like-minded fans. Please login to see our full range of forums as well as the ability to send and receive private messages, track your favourite topics and of course join in the discussions.

If you are a new visitor, join us for free. If you are an existing member please login below. Note: for members who joined under our old messageboard system, please login with your display name not your login name.


Go Back   The Trek BBS > Entertainment & Interests > TV & Media

TV & Media Non-Trek television, movies, books, music, etc.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old December 23 2010, 02:40 PM   #856
JacksonArcher
Vice Admiral
 
JacksonArcher's Avatar
 
Send a message via AIM to JacksonArcher
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

Buried ****
2010, R, 95 minutes
Starring Ryan Reynolds. Produced by Rodrigo Cortes. Cinematography by Edward Grau. Editing by Rodrigo Cortes. Music by Victor Reyes. Written by Chris Sparling. Directed by Rodrigo Cortes.

Buried, directed by Rodrigo Cortes and starring Ryan Reynolds, is the best film of 2010. Now, I still have some films to see before I should formally and officially make this statement, but I highly doubt there's going to be a film that surpasses this. Now, for those thinking this is hyperbolic, please realize I don't say this lightly, and there are many other terrific films I have seen and likely will see before this year is out. This is, however, without a single doubt in my mind, and with clear precision that I say this, but this is groundbreaking filmmaking and something you only see once in a while. This is something that involves you from the very first frame that opens and wraps around you like a praying mantis, holds you tight, firm in its tireless grip, and never lets you go until the very last frame that vanishes like smoke and leaves you literally breathless.

The great thing about Buried is that this is a film that reminds me why sometimes independent filmmaking is the place to go for stories that liven and excite. The story is at once utterly simplistic and yet completely innovative: We open up on Paul Conroy (Reynolds), who awakens alive in a casket with only a few items logged inside with him... a flashlight that flickers on and off every few seconds, a Zippo lighter that is incredibly difficult to maintain and manage, a cell phone with draining battery, a small container of water and that's about it. Here's the kicker: The film never leaves the casket. I don't feel that this is a spoiler since if you watch the trailer or if you read any interviews or any articles on the film this tidbit of information will likely be pretty prevalent, and honestly, while the idea just oozes with dramatic potential (and the film definitively utilizes that potential brilliantly), the film has much more interesting things to say and is an incredibly effective thriller despite its claustrophobic setting.

Of course, the problem about reviewing a movie like Buried is that the more you give away, the more you ultimately spoil, and in a movie so self-contained like this in terms of physicality and location, you definitely want to go in knowing as less as possible, given that you already know the movie is not leaving the casket. So I will be brief with this review, as to not reveal too much, and instead I will speak superlatives and go into detail at how much I utterly love and adore this piece of unbelievably fantastic filmmaking. I remember reading an interview with director Rodrigo Cortes, who makes his feature-film debut with Buried, and he talked about Alfred Hitchcock as an inspiration. That is quite evident from the opening titles, and the way the film is structured. If you've seen Hitchcock's Lifeboat or Rope or Strangers on a Train or even Vertigo, then you can be pretty sure how a movie such as Buried might unfold. The film oozes Hitchcock, both in inspiration and execution, but it amplifies things in such a manner that makes the events in the film so incredibly gripping and suspenseful despite the contained location. There are moments in the film where I was on the edge of my seat. It builds tension unlike any other film I've seen in a while, and while there are moments when the film quiets down, when it picks up, it really picks up.

One thing I need to talk about is the sole star in this movie that I hope receives the accolades and acclaim that he will so rightfully deserve: Ryan Reynolds. A lot of people dismiss this guy because he does a lot of films with the same cocky swagger, but he absolutely shatters those mannerisms and characteristic traits with his portrayal as Paul Conroy. Reynolds is the entire foundation, and if for some reason his performance was at all anything short of amazing, the entire film would collapse. Fortunately for the film and for the viewers, Reynolds is mesmerizing as Paul. While there are slight fragments of his trademark persona, they only come in piecemeal amounts and they are actually quite essential to the character. The film is so tense and nerve-wracking and the film literally puts Paul through the ringer that without moments of levity the audience might be slightly drained emotionally speaking, and it's those twisted moments of humor that calls back to Hitchcock the most.

There's really nothing much else I can say without ruining Buried, so all I'll say is that if you haven't seen this film, you are horribly missing out. This is what filmmaking is suppose to do: It's suppose to achieve something rare and original and fresh. Watching Buried is hard. It's not really a movie where you just simply sit down and watch, but something you must experience. The director, Rodrigo Cortes, literally brings you into the mindset of Paul, allowing you to share his desperation, his paranoia, but most importantly his willpower to survive. Where many films focus on so many characters that never feel fleshed out or real, Buried creates a living, breathing person with Paul, someone who you end up liking and you want to see survive. He feels like a full-fledged human being, and there are moments where you are squinting your eyes in horror, or yelling at the screen, telling Paul to do things, or wishing help would come and rescue Paul from his constant misery. It's that type of involvement that makes Buried such an incredible film. You are with the character every step of the way, and it's that rare experience that will likely shake you down to your core. It was minutes before I could stop shaking after witnessing the final frame, and the film will likely stay with me for days.

If you haven't seen Buried, you are doing yourself a disservice. What are you waiting for? Go and somehow see the best film of 2010. Don't let anything, or anyone, stop you. There are no excuses that are worthwhile or meaningful enough to allow you to not experience Buried. It's one of those rare films that comes along and redefines what we know about films and how stories are told. It's not just a gimmicky or clever premise, it's a film that grabs you by the collar and never lets go. It will shake you down to your core and change you. It's absolutely phenomenal filmmaking.
__________________
"Please... We need you to hope again... " - Professor Charles Xavier, X-Men: Days of Future Past
JacksonArcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 23 2010, 04:27 PM   #857
Captain Craig
Vice Admiral
 
Captain Craig's Avatar
 
Location: Nashville,TN
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

^^^^
Better than Black Swan?
I didn't read your whole post in case of spoilers. I want to see this also.
__________________
"Picard never hit me." Q-Less(DS9)
"Freedom is the Right of All Sentient Beings" Optimus Prime
Twitter:http://twitter.com/#!/CaptainCraig1
Captain Craig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 24 2010, 12:53 AM   #858
Harvey
Admiral
 
Harvey's Avatar
 
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

280. Star Trek: The Motion Picture [D]
281. Men in Black [A]
282. Blue Streak [B+]

STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE: I reviewed the Director's Edition of this film much earlier this year, and didn't much care for it. Thanks to Netflix, I was able to see the theatrical edition for the first time in over ten years (and, likely, the first time in widescreen). I may have to adjust my grade of the Director's Edition higher, because I was surprised by how much worse the theatrical version of the film is. I don't intend to write an in-depth review by any means, but allow me the pomposity of listing a few things that have undoubtedly been endlessly mulled over here and elsewhere on the internet.

First, I don’t understand why the cinematography is so hailed by some fans of the movie. The set is at once over-lit, exposing every crevice of the boring, monochromatic bridge set, and under-lit, resulting in the excessive use of split-diopter photography to awkwardly simulate depth of field. As a stylistic device, the split diopter effect can be a useful tool, dramatically separating the foreground and the background (witness the use of the effect in Oliver Stone’s film adaptation of TALK RADIO). As an occasional crutch, it can be a useful way of simulating depth of field when lighting a set with intensity is not possible (see Robert Wise’s earlier film, THE ANDROMEDA STRAIN). But here it is not an occasional crutch, nor is it a stylistic device to separate the foreground and the background.

Worse, the lifeless costumes (which at times are so form-fitting that they verge on camp) are no more colorful than the sets. The redesigned uniforms used in the rest of the movies may have not captured the vibrancy of the costumes from the television series, but at least the crimson tunics and white undershirts didn’t get lost amidst the flat décor like the costumes in STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE.

And then there is the matter of pacing. I appreciate the Director’s Edition much more now, because it eliminates so many pointless insert shots (here’s the Federation seal doing nothing for ten seconds, here’s some blinking lights on the helm console doing nothing for ten seconds, etc.) that pad out the film well past its welcome. Of course, there are the two big visual effects sequences in the film: the shuttle-pod approach and the V’Ger flyover. These have been both derided and praised by fans; I find myself falling somewhere in the middle. They’re by far the best effects work in the movie (most of the other sequences are plagued by matte lines and improperly composited live action), but they’re a little long.

The shuttle-pod approach is almost perfect. The music is beautiful, the effects are top-notch, and there’s a real sense of forward movement. If I were to re-cut it, I’d perhaps remove a minute, but probably not even that. What really hurts the sequence are the reaction shots of Kirk and Scotty—their performances are unconvincing (with the exception of that great, perhaps iconic close-up of Kirk when he gets his first look at the Enterprise from head-on) and by constantly returning to the actors we’re less sharing their wonder than experiencing it second-hand. Of course, this sequence is quickly followed by the Enterprise’s departure, which expands into several minutes what should be on screen for 60 seconds. There’s no reason every actor in the cast needs a close-up here, and although Jerry Goldsmith’s brilliant score allows me to forgive much, Wise should have really got on with it.

The V’Ger flyover on the other hand, is long—much too long. Wise wants to establish a sense of scale, and that’s fine, but there’s no reason to establish it three times. Worse, much of the dialogue describes action that is self-evident: “we have ceased forward motion,” etc. It’s the kind of material you give to your supporting cast during shooting, and then cut when you’re in the editing room because it expresses nothing that isn’t readily apparent—except here it’s all been left in.

I could go on, but for now, I won’t. Suffice it to say, the theatrical version of STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE is a profound disappointment in need of major changes—the Director’s Edition was a good try, but, unfortunately, not all the changes are ones that could be done during post-production.

MEN IN BLACK: This is still a terrific sf comedy. I wish more care had been put into the transfer for the Blu-Ray, however. There are several scenes with distracting scratches and I noticed the grain occasionally was out of control. Hopefully the third film will make up for the dismal sequel (although I’ll probably still prefer this as a standalone film that gives Kay a happy ending).

BLUE STREAK: Martin Lawrence’s best comedy, he indulges his over-the-top humor a few times, but nowhere near the excess of his later comedies. What really makes it work is the supporting cast, a collection of some of the best character actors working at the time.

...

Hopefully I'll be seeing HARRY POTTER 7.0 tonight, and then TRUE GRIT later in the week. I'd also like to see BLACK SWAN, but there may not be time. I have only ten days in the Northwest before I have to head back down to LA to continue school.
__________________
"This begs explanation." - de Forest Research on Star Trek

My blog: Star Trek Fact Check.
Harvey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 25 2010, 05:31 AM   #859
Captain Craig
Vice Admiral
 
Captain Craig's Avatar
 
Location: Nashville,TN
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

Today I saw the Johnny Depp & Angelina Jolie film: The Tourist.
My grade: B

I went into it having heard less than stellar comments about it's quality, pacing and acting. I'm not in agreement 100% with what I heard which is again why I don't listen to critics. I agree with a few points but perceived the outcome different.

Angelina's character, Elisa, is playing a passive-agressive character. I think so many are use to her as the main point of action from her turns in Mr/Mrs.Smith, Tomb Raider or Salt that her as the 'damsel' seems "boring".

Johnny Depp is playing, Frank, a man used to the more mundane but romaticizes about action and adventure. This strange woman Elisa has put him in the thick of something and he goes along. Therefore there is a sense of awkardness about his character. He is obviously taken by Elisa but he is trying to be a polite gentleman all at the same time. I think this is what the critics called 'zero chemistry' however I'd have to spoil the movie for you in order to tell you why it seems they played their parts the way they did.

The cinematography made great use of the countryside and Venice. About the only thing I see the critics got right were statements that commented on the camera lingering on Jolie. It did linger at times but as I saw it those were for slight facial expressions of curiosity, admiration or danger.

The pacing is indeed slow I won't argue that but it is moving with purpose which is different than moving slow and going seemingly nowhere. To put it differently I didn't feel the movie drug on for periods without moving the story along.

Now despite my apprecition of the film its one I'm glad I saw but I wouldn't own it I don't think. It is worth checking out though if nothing else on Netflix.
__________________
"Picard never hit me." Q-Less(DS9)
"Freedom is the Right of All Sentient Beings" Optimus Prime
Twitter:http://twitter.com/#!/CaptainCraig1
Captain Craig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 25 2010, 09:05 PM   #860
CaptainCanada
Admiral
 
CaptainCanada's Avatar
 
Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

90. Tangled (A-)
91. The Fighter (B+)
92. The Red Shoes (A+)
93. True Grit (A-)
94. Chicago (A+)

My cousin had never watched this before, so while she was over for the holidays I rewatched it with her: what movie better captures the spirit of the holidays, eh?

It's as great as I remember - I put it on my end of the decade Top 10, after all. Pretty much all of the song sequences are instantly iconic, and the performances are all great, including CZJ's Oscar-winning role (she's not done a tremendous amount since then, though she's now halfway to EGOT). John C. Reilly is very affecting as the one honest person in town, who of course ends up trampled; he does a great job of adding some depth of feeling to what is otherwise mostly (and purposefully) flashy and light on its feet. This is also easily my favourite Richard Gere performance, complete with some very good (if oddly-accented) singing - his musical numbers are a highlight.

Director Rob Marshall (who also choreographed the film) makes an amazing debut, one that neither of his subsequent films have lived up to. Both were incredibly stylish, but Memoirs of a Geisha was kind of dull, and with Nine he tried to replicate his earlier musical, but to much less affect (the attempt to turn the musical numbers into fantasy sequences didn't really work there). He's directing the next Pirates of the Caribbean film, so hopefully he'll get back to form with a bit of a change of scenery.
__________________
"I'm a white male, age 18 to 49. Everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are!"

- Homer Simpson
CaptainCanada is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 26 2010, 04:12 AM   #861
CaptainCanada
Admiral
 
CaptainCanada's Avatar
 
Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

90. Tangled (A-)
91. The Fighter (B+)
92. The Red Shoes (A+)
93. True Grit (A-)
94. Chicago (A+)
95. It's A Wonderful Life (A+)

Going to a more Christmas-y film, this was the ideal day to finally watch the Blu-Ray that I bought back in January. Really, what can you say about this one? It's a classic, it's been imitated or parodied by every other TV show at one point (the other half chose to do A Christmas Carol instead). It's one of my all-time favourite films, with great performances, particularly from Jimmy Stewart (and Lionel Barrymore, making the case for him being the best actor who never got to portray Ebenezer Scrooge, due to an injury keeping him from playing the role in the 1938 film version) - and the technical aspects hold up surprisingly well (the characters don't age much, but that's to be expected, and frankly, the black-and-white disguises it a lot better than if this movie had been made in colour twenty years later). Unlike a lot of other movies that run purely sentiment, the film adroitly balances sentimentality with some pretty deep despair as George's world comes crashing down, before he's saved.

And while people tend to focus on the final half hour (which is, after all, the movie's big narrative twist), a lot of the earlier stuff is also important, particularly these days. This was for an audience that had lived through the Depression, and Capra pits Bailey's earnest working-man capitalism against Potter's relentless greed. After the 2008 market collapse, there were a lot of people who linked George's Building & Loan logic to the subprime mortgage meltdown, but while that may seem persuasive on the surface, it's really a completely absurd comparison - the traditional business setup of the Building & Loan is so different (and so much more reliable) than the insane convolutions of the 21st century stock market and lending business that it really just illuminates the extent to which the Mr. Potters of the world are safely ensconced in the corridors of power.
__________________
"I'm a white male, age 18 to 49. Everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are!"

- Homer Simpson

Last edited by CaptainCanada; December 26 2010 at 04:26 AM.
CaptainCanada is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 26 2010, 06:22 AM   #862
ElimParra
Fleet Admiral
 
ElimParra's Avatar
 
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

Watched Australia (8/10) last night, as I brought the DVD for mum. Still found it enjoyable to watch, after seeing for the first time in over 12 months.
ElimParra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 26 2010, 06:31 PM   #863
CaptainCanada
Admiral
 
CaptainCanada's Avatar
 
Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

90. Tangled (A-)
91. The Fighter (B+)
92. The Red Shoes (A+)
93. True Grit (A-)
94. Chicago (A+)
95. It's A Wonderful Life (A+)
96. Michael Clayton (A)

I sometimes wonder if I give out too many As to the movies I see, but, no, I'm just selective and good at picking films that I'll like.

This is a superb little film from writer/director Tony Gilroy - it reminded me a lot of another George Clooney film from earlier this year, The American, which had a similar realistic, low-key style (though The American was a lot less positively received by the public). Clooney's a great presence in the movies not just because he's a great actor (and director), but because he's willing to loan out his marquee name to a lot of films with extremely limited commercial prospects.

Tilda Swinton won the Oscar for this movie, and it's a good performance (though from the Oscar, you might expect her to have more screentime than she actually does). I was actually more impressed by Tom Wilkinson, though - one of my favourite character actors. Also nice was the presence of Sydney Pollack, who a decade or two earlier might have been directing this movie. I like the movie's handling of fairly familiar story elements (indeed, from the plot alone this could be a John Grisham novel); there's no over-the-top villainy.
__________________
"I'm a white male, age 18 to 49. Everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are!"

- Homer Simpson
CaptainCanada is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 26 2010, 07:03 PM   #864
Captain Craig
Vice Admiral
 
Captain Craig's Avatar
 
Location: Nashville,TN
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

The Duchess - Keira Knightly, Ralph Fiennes & Haley Atwell
Grade: B

I confess that this was a research film. I've not seen Haley Atwell act and since I'm eager for Captain America this summer I felt I needed to see her in something. Having seen Haley in this period piece showed me she carries herself with a strong poise and grace. She was beautiful in her costume there(late 18th century/early 19th) so I'll be curious to see her in her 1940s outfits.

As for the movie itself I found it to be a good movie but still don't get the appeal of Keira Knightly overall. She is a competent actress but nothing more.
__________________
"Picard never hit me." Q-Less(DS9)
"Freedom is the Right of All Sentient Beings" Optimus Prime
Twitter:http://twitter.com/#!/CaptainCraig1
Captain Craig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 26 2010, 07:06 PM   #865
CaptainCanada
Admiral
 
CaptainCanada's Avatar
 
Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

Captain Craig wrote: View Post
She was beautiful in her costume there(late 18th century/early 19th) so I'll be curious to see her in her 1940s outfits.
Check out Brideshead Revisited from a few years ago for her in period (well, 1920s, but that's pretty close) clothing.

I remember liking The Duchess; it's on the lower end of Knightley's costume dramas, but it's well-made, and it sort of deconstructs what was then becoming Knightley's stock-in-trade, the spunky ahead-of-her-time girl.
__________________
"I'm a white male, age 18 to 49. Everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are!"

- Homer Simpson
CaptainCanada is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 27 2010, 07:51 PM   #866
pitermalan
Cadet
 
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

The Movies Seen in 2010 is

1. Inglourious Basterds
2. The Hurt Locker
3. Zombieland
4. The Road
5. Up in the Air
__________________
music shops
pitermalan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 28 2010, 02:28 AM   #867
CaptainCanada
Admiral
 
CaptainCanada's Avatar
 
Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

90. Tangled (A-)
91. The Fighter (B+)
92. The Red Shoes (A+)
93. True Grit (A-)
94. Chicago (A+)
95. It's A Wonderful Life (A+)
96. Michael Clayton (A)
97. Fantasia (C+)

Walt Disney's dream project is an instance of a studio shooting for unabashed art over commercialism - and also an example of why studios usually don't do that, because it cost them tons of money. As groundbreaking as the animation was, it's not particularly accessible to people who aren't huge fans of the particular musical pieces. I really wanted to like this, given the ambition and the technical skill involved, but most of the sequences are uninvolving. "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" is the most famous, often aired on its own as an animated short, which is why I'd seen it before; indeed, I think a lot of these would have worked better as shorts. Strung together as a two-hour film, it starts to test one's patience. My favourite was probably the Greco-Roman mythology-inspired "Pastoral Symphony".
__________________
"I'm a white male, age 18 to 49. Everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are!"

- Homer Simpson
CaptainCanada is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 28 2010, 06:17 AM   #868
Starbreaker
Fleet Admiral
 
Starbreaker's Avatar
 
Location: Chattanooga, TN
View Starbreaker's Twitter Profile
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

I'm always amazed at the people who come in here and say "none" or have only watched two or three movies by December.
__________________
Currently Reading: The Abominable by Dan Simmons
Starbreaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 28 2010, 07:03 AM   #869
zakkrusz
Rear Admiral
 
zakkrusz's Avatar
 
Location: The Wired
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

Updates: (in Bold)
Aliens in the Attic (6)
Armored Trooper Votoms: Big Battle (7)
Armored Trooper Votoms: Roots of Ambition (8)
Armored Trooper Votoms: The Last Red Shoulder (8)
Armored Trooper Votoms: Pailsen Files: The Movie (7)
Batman: Under The Red Hood (9)
Boondock Saints (10)
Boondock Saints: All Saint's Day (9)
The Book of Eli (8)
Broken Blade (7)
Cardcaptor Sakura: The Movie (7)
Cargo (7)
Cencoroll (8)
Les Chevaliers du Ciel (8)
Clash of the Titans (2010) (8)
Crazy Heart (6)
Dante's Inferno (2010) (7)
Date Night (7)
The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya (9)
District 9 (8)
Eden of the East: The King of Eden (8)
Eden of the East: Paradise Lost (8)
The Edge of Darkness (9)
Evangelion 2.0: You Can [Not] Advance (9)
The Expendables (9)
The Fantastic Mr. Fox (8)
Fate/Stay Night: Unlimited Blade Works (9)
Fist of the North Star (1995) (4)
G-9 (6)
Gamer (6)
Green Zone (7)
Harry Potter the the Deathly Hallows (8)
Higurashi no Naka Koroni Chikai (7)
Inception (10)
Inglorious Bastards (7)
Iron Man 2 (9)
Jonah Hex (6)
The Killers (6)
King of Thorn (8)
Kino's Journey: Life Goes On (7)
Kino's Journey: The Country of Disease (7)
The Last Airbender (8)
Law Abiding Citizen (9)
The Lovely Bones (6)
Lupin the 3rd: First Contact (7)
Lupin the 3rd: Green VS Red (6)
Lupin the 3rd VS Detective Konan (7)
Lupin the 3rd: The Secret of Mamo (9)
Lupin the 3rd: The Last Job
Macross Frontier: The False Songstress (9)
My Name is Bruce (5)
Naruto Shippuden Movie 3 (8)
Oblivion Island (6)
Oceans (Documentary/ Rating is NA)
Oldboy (9)
Pandorum (7)
Planzet (5)
Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (8)
Street Fighter IV: The Ties That Bind (8)
Summer Wars (9)
Sunshine (4)
Sword For Truth (6)
Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann: Lagann-hen (8)
They Were 11 (9)
TRON: Legacy (8)
The Triplets of Belleville (5)
The Uninvited (7)
Unstoppable (8)
Walking Tall (7)
Waltz With Bashir (9)
The Warrior's Way (6)
Wicked City (8)
__________________
"There are few wars between good and evil; most are between one good and another good."
—Yang Wen-li-Legend of the Galactic Heroes
zakkrusz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 28 2010, 11:52 PM   #870
CaptainCanada
Admiral
 
CaptainCanada's Avatar
 
Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Re: Movies Seen in 2010

90. Tangled (A-)
91. The Fighter (B+)
92. The Red Shoes (A+)
93. True Grit (A-)
94. Chicago (A+)
95. It's A Wonderful Life (A+)
96. Michael Clayton (A)
97. Fantasia (C+)
98. Long Day's Journey Into Night (B+)

A 1962 film adaptation of Eugene O'Neill's 1942 play, it shouldn't have existed by O'Neill's own design, since he left instructions with his wife not to publish it until 25 years after his death (1977, as it turned out). But O'Neill's papers fell into the hands of Yale University, and they had other ideas (kind of uncharitable, really). O'Neill won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama four times, more than anyone else (though he should technically be tied with Edward Albee, who was voted the prize four times, but only three times was given it), and is the only American dramatist to win the Nobel Prize for Literature. This has gone down as probably his most famous work, and it's an autobiography of his home life with a disguise that isn't even paper-thin.

This would have been a TV movie if made a few decades later (indeed, a few more TV movies have been made of it) - nearly three hours long, with only four characters (plus a maid) and basically one set. It's a filmed play in pretty much every sense of the word, though Sidney Lumet does manage to move the camera around (and use it to some effect) more than in many such examples from this period. The four main characters are all pretty much perfectly cast: two elderly icons of the screen, Katherine Hepburn and Sir Ralph Richardson, as the parents, and Jason Robards and Dean Stockwell as the sons. Robards went on to win two Oscars and was a famous character actor; Stockwell never really lived up to the potential he showed here, eventually becoming a fixture on various genre TV shows in his old age.

The play/film is justly famous, and Hepburn does a great job of playing her recovering/relapsed addict (and the way everyone else reacts to her feels authentic; given that this is all drawn so much from O'Neill's personal experience, that's unsurprising). The film is basically a series of two-person conversations in just about every configuration possible, and everybody gets their moments in the spotlight. I will say, though, that it's hard not to notice that of the four, Edmund (Stockwell), who is O'Neill's avatar, is the only one with no real faults. He's suffering from consumption (the gloomy ending makes you think he's going to die, but, obviously, he didn't), but that's not a flaw of personality, which is what everyone else has (even if they're given sympathetic reasons for them). Maybe that is how it went down, but all the same.
__________________
"I'm a white male, age 18 to 49. Everyone listens to me, no matter how dumb my suggestions are!"

- Homer Simpson
CaptainCanada is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
movies

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:38 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
FireFox 2+ or Internet Explorer 7+ highly recommended.