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Old April 21 2010, 12:02 PM   #31
JarodRussell
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

There probably is some kind of public transporter system (haha, what a pun). Not everyone has a plane today, so I doubt everyone would have a tranporter pad in his living room.

Beaming is dangerous, so I think everyone who wants to control the thing needs to have a licence. I mean what about the people who don't know what they are doing and beam themselves into a wall?

The fun thing about Sisko's statement is: if he was able to be beamed into his own living room, then Starfleet (or whoever owns that transporter) has the equipment to scan every single building on Earth. Because they need to know where the furniture is, if a person is walking by, etc... to do a save transport. A scary thought.
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Old April 21 2010, 01:33 PM   #32
Timo
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

That sort of equipment is probably quite common - and as the result, various jammers might also be common household items...

However, just because Ben Sisko beamed into his family's living room doesn't mean Starfleet was able to scan that living room. Perhaps the Siskos simply gave coordinates for the one area in that room that's always free of obstacles and awaits transportees? Or perhaps the Siskos had a transporter receiver (less than a full pad, perhaps) in their living room.

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Old April 22 2010, 08:39 AM   #33
T'deD'Edkeid'Ende'Dejdid
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

With the ability to travel across the globe in the blink of an eye and with the planet more integrated than it is today, how does once deal with time zones. The UFP President summons a few admirals for a briefing at noon in Paris and asks them beam over. But it's 3am in San Francisco. It seems the UFP President will only be able to talk with the night shift at Starfleet HQ.
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Old April 22 2010, 10:25 AM   #34
Joshua Howard
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

^ Just as the Enterprise has its own special time zone, there may be some standard of universal time in the future as people cease to be constrained by planetary geography. In theory, it would be easier for people on the west coast of the U.S. to go to bed at 2000 hours and those on the east coast go to bed at 2400 hours than it would be for everyone to try to adjust the clock.

Just as the internet transformed literature, so transporters could transform travel. Twenty years ago, a community such as this one would have probably involved people meeting in person, or simply not existed. Today, the internet makes it possible for the entire world to share information instantly. Brick and Mortar libraries serve a secondary purpose, and even things like television news struggle to keep up with the broad array of information available online. Of course, the internet cannot and will not make books a thing of the past. Likewise, transporters certainly don't make all other forms of transportation disappear entirely.

It is important to remember that the ability to hop from place to place with transporters would mean that people's orientation to their planet in the 24th century is more akin to people's orientation to their metropolitan region today. Travel to other fairly nearby planets in that context would be the 24th century version of our idea of travelling around the country or the world.

If you can walk down to the transporter depot in New York at noon and be in London instantly, that means that global economics changes a great deal from the present model. There would be no reason why someone couldn't live on one side of the world and work on the other side, as the commute wouldn't really be a problem (though that would be darn like working the night shift).

I think we can be certain that transporters are very much a part of earth transportation. The more interesting question is how that changes the way people live. Just as the internet makes many people tune in to specific interests instead of reading whole books (i.e., instead of buying a cookbook, you google "how to make soup") so likewise a global transporter network would make people less aware of their immediate regions, kind of like the way interstate freeways make drivers pay less attention to the things that lie between their starting point and destination.
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Old April 22 2010, 02:25 PM   #35
macloudt
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

The one downside I can see with the public transporter stations is that there must be one helluva queue. People going to the same destination can be beamed together but most people will want to go to different places, so these stations must be huge, like international airports today, or it's not worth the wait and people take alternate forms of transport.

Depite what Geordi may say about transporter safety I would only travel this way if there was no alternative. The thought of being taken apart at the molecular level makes my head spin.
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Old April 22 2010, 05:16 PM   #36
neozeks
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

Timo wrote: View Post
That sort of equipment is probably quite common - and as the result, various jammers might also be common household items...
Given the power of transporters as a means to do bad things, extensive security measures are a given. That's why I think it's likely publicly available transporters would be restricted (by hardware or software - though hacking would be a threat in the latter case) just to pad-to-pad transporting.
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Old April 22 2010, 08:17 PM   #37
JarodRussell
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

macloudt wrote: View Post
The one downside I can see with the public transporter stations is that there must be one helluva queue. People going to the same destination can be beamed together but most people will want to go to different places, so these stations must be huge, like international airports today, or it's not worth the wait and people take alternate forms of transport.

Depite what Geordi may say about transporter safety I would only travel this way if there was no alternative. The thought of being taken apart at the molecular level makes my head spin.
You could beam a dozen people at once to a dozen different locations. Just enter different destinations to each pad. Then it'll be like riding a bus.

Public transport would not beam people anywhere they like. People could only beam from one station to another station. That's something that can be coordinated very easily.
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Old April 22 2010, 09:08 PM   #38
macloudt
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

JarodRussell wrote: View Post
macloudt wrote: View Post
The one downside I can see with the public transporter stations is that there must be one helluva queue. People going to the same destination can be beamed together but most people will want to go to different places, so these stations must be huge, like international airports today, or it's not worth the wait and people take alternate forms of transport.

Depite what Geordi may say about transporter safety I would only travel this way if there was no alternative. The thought of being taken apart at the molecular level makes my head spin.
You could beam a dozen people at once to a dozen different locations. Just enter different destinations to each pad. Then it'll be like riding a bus.

Public transport would not beam people anywhere they like. People could only beam from one station to another station. That's something that can be coordinated very easily.
This is true. Still I can see some backlogs occurring during the 24thC equivalent of rush hour, but I suppose that would be unavoidable using any method of transportation. Come to think of it, many people in the 24thC would probably work from home, so I may be making a mountain out of a molehill. It's been a long day. Ignore me.
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Old April 22 2010, 09:27 PM   #39
Joshua Howard
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

^ Another thing to remember is that machines do a great deal of work for people. For example, all of the work that involves running computers and doing paperwork could be done by a computer without any human operator, at least not in the 21st century sense.

Replication technology decreases the demand for industrial labor and advance computer technology decreases the demand for clerical labor. Since most modern vocations would nolonger be something that most people engaged in, it seems probable that work traffic would constitute a much smaller percentage of total volume than is true today.

In theory, most of the population has so little to do that it has the free time to pursue the level of technical knowledge necessary to make Starships and space stations a normal part of the economic product. It seems quite probable that beyond scientific institutions on earth, universities, and some cultural amenities, most working people nolonger perform their work on Earth, and are instead assigned to Starbases, outposts, colonies, ships, or other off-earth endeavors. What this amounts to is that people on Earth in the 24th century may use the entire planet for little more than recreation.

Of course, I am drifting from the original topic, and I don't want to do that too much. The question of domestic spacecraft does enter into the equation at this point however, and more especially, (A) where commuter spacecraft are docked and (B) the convenience with which earth people are able to transport to them.
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Old April 22 2010, 09:47 PM   #40
Mr. Laser Beam
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

JarodRussell wrote: View Post
Beaming is dangerous, so I think everyone who wants to control the thing needs to have a licence. I mean what about the people who don't know what they are doing and beam themselves into a wall?
Or people who don't want strangers beaming into their private homes? In a world where transporters exist, how can privacy be protected?
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Old April 23 2010, 12:20 AM   #41
T'Girl
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

If it's a possession-less society and everything is provided by the great replicator gods, then you don't really own a private home. Why couldn't anyone just beam in anywhere?
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Old April 23 2010, 12:38 AM   #42
JarodRussell
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

T'Girl wrote: View Post
If it's a possession-less society and everything is provided by the great replicator gods, then you don't really own a private home. Why couldn't anyone just beam in anywhere?
It's not a possession-less society, it's a money-less economy. Two different things. For example all the stuff in Picard's quarters belongs to him, but he didn't neccessarily pay for it. And privacy is still a right for everyone.
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Old April 23 2010, 07:09 PM   #43
Dusty Ayres
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

Timo wrote: View Post
Many would probably prefer to beam to within a walking distance of a target, yet not to the target itself; a social code might develop in which it is rude or perhaps illegal to beam directly to pretty much anywhere. Some advanced technology might also be needed to protect the privacy of one's home or workplace.
In the novel Enterprise: The First Adventure, it's forbidden to be able to beam yourself into historical preservation areas like Yellowstone National Park or Banff National Park, because it would disturb the peace and tranquility of the place (presumably except in an emergency). For that reason, comlinks are also forbidden.
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Old April 23 2010, 10:23 PM   #44
T'Girl
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

As bitchy as I get about cellphones in theaters and some other places, natural parks are a area where comlinks of some kind should be required by law.
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Old April 24 2010, 12:11 AM   #45
Mr. Laser Beam
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Re: Transporters in everyday life

As long as the common citizens have access to transport inhibitors (so they can prevent people beaming into their private homes and moments), I'm okay with that.
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