RSS iconTwitter iconFacebook icon

The Trek BBS title image

The Trek BBS statistics

Threads: 135,670
Posts: 5,212,594
Members: 24,197
Currently online: 616
Newest member: Trek's Offender


Welcome! The Trek BBS is the number one place to chat about Star Trek with like-minded fans. Please login to see our full range of forums as well as the ability to send and receive private messages, track your favourite topics and of course join in the discussions.

If you are a new visitor, join us for free. If you are an existing member please login below. Note: for members who joined under our old messageboard system, please login with your display name not your login name.


Go Back   The Trek BBS > Entertainment & Interests > TV & Media

TV & Media Non-Trek television, movies, books, music, etc.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old April 14 2010, 03:25 PM   #1
John Picard
Vice Admiral
 
John Picard's Avatar
 
Location: Waiting for Dorian Thompson to invite me to lunch
Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

Some of you have stated in various discussions that "cable TV would never go away", and I've always responded, "never say never".
Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord,' report says


Make no mistake: The big cable, satellite, and telco carriers are still sitting pretty with more than 100 million TV subscribers. Nevertheless, a new report claims that more and more viewers are "cutting the cord" in favor of watching their favorite shows via over-the-air antennas (remember those?), Netflix, or the Web.
TechCrunch has the scoop on a new report from the Toronto-based Convergence Consulting Group, and though the figures may not be a "serious threat" to the big cable and satellite carriers yet, the trend might eventually spell trouble for the like of Cablevision, Comcast, DirecTV, and Time Warner Cable.

To wit: Nearly 800,000 households in the U.S. have "cut the cord," dumping their cable, satellite, or telco TV providers (such as AT&T U-verse or Verizon FiOS) and turning instead to Web-based videos (like Hulu), downloadable shows (iTunes), by-mail subscription services (Netflix), or even good ol' over-the-air antennas for their favorite shows, according to the report.

Now, as TechCrunch points out, the estimated 800,000 cord cutters represent less than 1 percent of the 100 million U.S. households (give or take) currently subscribing to a cable/satellite/telco TV carrier, so it's not like we're talking a mass exodus here. But by the end of 2011, the report guesstimates, the number of cord-cutting households in the U.S. will double to about 1.6 million, and if the trend continues, well...
IIRC, there once was a company called Blockbuster that was at the top of the video and game rental industry, when along came Netflix and GameStop...
__________________
Don't like my posts? Fill out a report.
Psssstttt - Dorian, my location.
John Picard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 03:42 PM   #2
Professor Zoom
Vice Admiral
 
Professor Zoom's Avatar
 
Location: Idealistic
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

I've thought about cutting the cord. I do think it's the beginning of a trend of wrapping the internet and the TV watching experience together.

Network and Cable must be scrambling to figure out how to make money...
__________________
Batman does not eat nachos.
Professor Zoom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 03:52 PM   #3
stj
Rear Admiral
 
stj's Avatar
 
Location: the real world
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

We can't get but one broadcast channel in this area. Cable has been here since the Fifties, for good reason. It's not leaving our town.
__________________
The people of this country need regime change here, not abroad.
stj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 03:55 PM   #4
ParticleMan
Fleet Captain
 
ParticleMan's Avatar
 
Location: Zooland, NC
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

The current state of the economy probably has as much, if not more, to do with this than any attempt to move forward with newer technologies. People are realizing they are spending $75-100/month for multitudes of channels they don't even bother watching when they can spend less than $10/month combining web video and Netflix services to get basically the same product without all the filler...

I wonder if people will go back to subscription cable/satellite once things pick up? I'd guess probably not, but we'll see...
__________________
"Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it we go nowhere." - Carl Sagan
ParticleMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 04:14 PM   #5
John Picard
Vice Admiral
 
John Picard's Avatar
 
Location: Waiting for Dorian Thompson to invite me to lunch
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

stj wrote: View Post
We can't get but one broadcast channel in this area. Cable has been here since the Fifties, for good reason. It's not leaving our town.
You mean to tell me there is no broadband access in your area? You're tempting Fate by stating "not leaving our town", but what do you think will happen if/when the FCC gets the National Broadband Plan in action in the US.

Like I said, "Never say Never".
__________________
Don't like my posts? Fill out a report.
Psssstttt - Dorian, my location.
John Picard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 04:18 PM   #6
LitmusDragon
Commodore
 
LitmusDragon's Avatar
 
Location: The Barmuda Triangle
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

I've considered doing this from time to time. Basically I'm paying $100+ a month to catch one or two first-run shows as they air. It is wasteful in the grand scheme of things.

edit:
On second thought, cable is my best source of high-speed internet in my area. I can live without the cable but the internet? No. I need that.
__________________
I made an 8-bit style RPG, here it is
I'm getting married on July 19, 2014.
LitmusDragon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 04:42 PM   #7
Warp Coil
Rear Admiral
 
Warp Coil's Avatar
 
Location: MD, USA
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

I did this two months ago. No regrets so far. I'm saving $80/month. I really only care about a select few TV shows - Lost, Caprica, Friday Night Lights - and I can watch them on Hulu for free. I also like Dexter and True Blood, but I never paid for the premium channels anyway so it's not like I was used to watching them by conventional means.

Between Hulu, Netflix and my own DVD collection I have plenty to keep me happy. I'm also reading books, playing video games, going to the gym, hanging out with friends and doing other things that eat up my time so it's not like I'm bored and need to sit on the couch and channel surf.
__________________
"I managed to find Uno and Checkers, and also parts of Battleship and most of the pieces of Candy Land, which I figure, I can mix together to create a fabulous new game, CandyShipBattleLand. War never tasted so good." - Lorelai Gilmore
Warp Coil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 04:45 PM   #8
bigdaddy
Vice Admiral
 
Location: Space Massachusetts
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

So 800,000 people cut it since... the beginning of time? The article is stupid.
__________________
The powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse.
bigdaddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 05:02 PM   #9
Mr. Laser Beam
Fleet Admiral
 
Mr. Laser Beam's Avatar
 
Location: The visitor's bullpen
View Mr. Laser Beam's Twitter Profile
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

I still have cable, mainly because I'm a baseball fan and MLB.TV is not exactly 100% reliable.
__________________
Taysiders in Space. In amungst ye!

"Set phasers tae malky!"
Mr. Laser Beam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 05:35 PM   #10
stj
Rear Admiral
 
stj's Avatar
 
Location: the real world
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

John Picard wrote: View Post
stj wrote: View Post
We can't get but one broadcast channel in this area. Cable has been here since the Fifties, for good reason. It's not leaving our town.
You mean to tell me there is no broadband access in your area? You're tempting Fate by stating "not leaving our town", but what do you think will happen if/when the FCC gets the National Broadband Plan in action in the US.

Like I said, "Never say Never".
The cable company is the broadband access provider in this area. There is no independent broadband access here.
__________________
The people of this country need regime change here, not abroad.
stj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 06:02 PM   #11
SJSharksfan39
Admiral
 
SJSharksfan39's Avatar
 
Location: Clone Club
View SJSharksfan39's Twitter Profile
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

Mr. Laser Beam wrote: View Post
I still have cable, mainly because I'm a baseball fan and MLB.TV is not exactly 100% reliable.
If I wasn't so into Sports, I would probably do the same thing. I don't pay for the special packages, but even if I could, you can't get, say, the final round of the Masters or the Super Bowl online. And if you could, why would you want to watch something like that online.

This is why I wish there was an A la carte option. Smaller networks would never go for it, but we're paying so much for so much crap that it really isn't worth it.
__________________
Twitter
SJSharksfan39 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 06:12 PM   #12
Mr. B
Vice Admiral
 
Mr. B's Avatar
 
Location: New Orleans
Send a message via ICQ to Mr. B Send a message via AIM to Mr. B Send a message via Windows Live Messenger to Mr. B Send a message via Yahoo to Mr. B
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

Considering the current economic circumstances, 800,000 fewer customers in two years seems like a low number.
__________________
“Ridicule is the tribute paid to the genius by the mediocrities.”
-Oscar Wilde
Mr. B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 06:44 PM   #13
Scout101
Admiral
 
Scout101's Avatar
 
Location: Rhode Island, USA
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

Less than a percent, so not really much to try and draw a trend from, especially if you consider that some of it is likely a result of the current economic situation, and not because of choice or finding the internet/netflix more convenient...
__________________
Perhaps, if I am very lucky, the feeble efforts of my lifetime will someday be noticed and maybe, in some small way, they will be acknowledged as the greatest works of genius ever created by man. ~Jack Handey
STO: @JScout33
Scout101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 07:17 PM   #14
SlyCardie
Commander
 
SlyCardie's Avatar
 
Location: Washington, DC
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

There are still a good amount of shows that don't appear online that I want to watch, but you're definitely right about the sports things. Crazy that so many people just stopped.
SlyCardie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 14 2010, 07:50 PM   #15
Arrqh
Vice Admiral
 
View Arrqh's Twitter Profile
Re: Nearly 800,000 U.S. TV households 'cut the cord'

Scout101 wrote: View Post
Less than a percent, so not really much to try and draw a trend from, especially if you consider that some of it is likely a result of the current economic situation, and not because of choice or finding the internet/netflix more convenient...
It's just a fraction of the market, but there's still enough data to pull out a general trend. It certainly doesn't mean the end is nigh for cable, of course.

Convergence Consulting Group said that cord-cutters currently represent less than three percent of people who watch full TV shows online—that's because the majority of Americans use online video to supplement their TV viewing habits, not replace them. This is good news for the networks and advertisers, as ad revenue on traditional broadcasts is still many orders of magnitude higher than what can be scraped together online. This much is evidenced by some of Hulu's troubles in keeping popular shows on its site and its ad bucket full.

Still, the number of US households going without satellite or cable is expected to reach 1.6 million by the end of 2011. These people are looking to iTunes, Netflix, over-the-air broadcasts, and other streaming options to take care of their needs—they're looking to DVD and Blu-ray less thanks to "tough economic times" and because Netflix, Redbox, and online options offer a lower value proposition.
That, of course, is the whole reason why content producers delay their DVD and online releases—they want to make as much money as possible from the traditional broadcast before they defer to lower-level revenue generators. And because content creators can do that, they will continue to do so forever—or until the online-only market becomes so large that it will be impossible to ignore. 1.6 million households in 2011 is pretty large, but it's not enough to tip the scale just yet.
http://arstechnica.com/media/news/20...t-for-most.ars
__________________
Don't you know? The chances of a random object being a scone are about one in six.
Arrqh is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
cable, hulu, television

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:45 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
FireFox 2+ or Internet Explorer 7+ highly recommended.