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Old January 17 2010, 06:58 AM   #136
thew40
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

RandyS wrote: View Post
^Maybe all Soongs after him are illegitmate? One of my best friends' parents were never married, but he was raised by his dad and stepmom and carries his dad's last name.

By the way, I've been enjoying your reviews of my least favorite Star Trek series. Keep 'em coming.

Can't wait for you to get to TATV.
Thank you!
Might be a while for TATV as, chronologically, it takes place in TNG season 6 (I think).

-----

Series: Enterprise - Season Four
Episode: “The Forge”
Trek Installment # 81
Grade: B+
Viewing Date: November 23, 2009

We finally get into the Vulcan arc, which I’ve been wanting to see for a long while. I’ve made my opinions about the Vulcan very clear. I don’t really like them; but this arc is what changes my mind.

I loved Soval and Forest’s talk about humanity. Very interesting and allowed for a more insightful view of the Vulcan’s take on we Earthlings. Poor Forest. He was a pretty decent character, though he wasn’t much more than a background player. He went out well, though, saving Soval. Archer and Soval’s scene with the caskets was the high point of the episode. It spoke well of the development of Soval and Archer and really brought their characters together.

Though it’s strange to see Soval playing the good guy. Awesome, but strange.

The basketball game was fun.

The Forge was well-presented and we got some great peeks into Vulcan mythology, as well as showing us that the Asshat Vulcans actually just wrong.

-----------

Series: Enterprise - Season Four
Episode: “The Awakening”
Trek Installment # 82
Grade: B+
Viewing Date: November 23, 2009

While I would say this episode is a lot like “Cold Station 12” in that it’s hard to judge on its own, it does in fact offer a more closed story. We get a nice dose of the Syrannites and get a better understanding of the politics and motivations of the characters present – to an extent.

V’Les is the one character who is almost impossible to pin down. I find him to be very mustache twirling and clichéd. He is way too emotional and it bothers me that he basically has one guy standing up to him and the rest of the Vulcan flunkies just kinda standing around. The idea of war with Andoria not unbelievable, given Shran’s actions in the Delphic Expanse, but no one questions the guy at all – at least, not more than he needs to be.

On the other hand, we have T’Pau and T’Les, who are both well-rounded, very balance Vulcans that we know so well. T’Pau, actually, is super-hot. Yum. Er . . . but yeah, they bring about Vulcans that are flawed as well. They’re struggling not only to fit into society, but to also accept humanity and other aliens.

Then there’s Surak, who is very well played. He brings about a much needed change in Archer, who goes a little Indian Jones here. More than that, though, Surak becomes what moves Archer away from the last of his prejudices towards Vulcans.

And, once more, Soval is just weird playing the good guy. But he does it so well!

-----------

Series: Enterprise - Season Four
Episode: “The Awakening”
Trek Installment # 83
Grade: B-
Viewing Date: November 23, 2009

So we have come to the end of the Vulcan arc, which is pretty damn exciting. Lots of action for a race that I once considered to be the most boring out of all species. While the first two parts dealt with more heavily with the political and mythological aspects of Vulcans, this one delivered the, er, more action-y parts.

It definitely made a pretty big splash in the overall Trek-verse, with introducing the true teachings of Surak, placing T’Pau at the top, putting Soval back in her ambassadorial role – and, most importantly, allowing humanity to stand on its own.

It puts to rest Archer’s hatred of Vulcans – which, in my mind, is effectively gone the moment he gives the Vulcan salute. It ends the war with the Andorians – after a wicked battle, of course. And hey, we got Shran in and he was pretty badass and awesome. T’Pol was also cured of her Pa’Nar.

But while I applaud the introduction of these concepts, I can’t help but reopen my critisms about V’Les. These are pretty much washed away at the end, with the revelation that Romulans had been involved. But I still have to bitch about the cardboard cutouts that just kinda stand around and look like Vulcans instead of saying “shut up” or “he’s wrong” or speaking at all. And I thought the scenes of Shran torturing Soval were a little much and seemed forced.

Other than that, though, this was great. Let’s do it again in, say, two episodes? Good? Great. It’s a date.
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Old January 23 2010, 05:17 AM   #137
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

Whoa, fallin' behind!

Series: Enterprise - Season Four
Episode: “Daedalus”
Trek Installment # 84
Grade: D-
Viewing Date: November 26, 2009

One of the first things I noticed was how relaxed everyone is. Felt like old times. And there was some more “are they or aren’t they” moments for Trip and T’Pol. Beyond that, this episode was a failure.

It had a failed scientist coming aboard to fix a failed mission that his failure son went on. While I liked meeting Ericson and actually liked the actor, it just didn’t work out. It collapsed in execution, despite at times reminding me of TNG and TOS. Archer’s faith in Ericson comes as a big surprise as he never seemed to trust the transporter. If he didn’t have faith in it to begin with, then that means that Archer lacks faith in Ericson and thus should not be so trusting of him in this failed experiment.

This episode belonged in the first season.

D– for doing some universe building, though.

-----------

Series: Enterprise – Season Four
Episode: “Observer Effect”
Trek Installment # 85
Grade: A-
Viewing Date: November 26, 2009

Creepy yet cool teaser.

Why is it the best Enterprise episodes have to do with death and mortality? It doesn’t make any sense to me, but . . . whatever, it works. This one does a great job of finally giving Hoshi some time to shine and has her connect with Trip and deepening their friendship.

The use of the Organians here was a very good choice. While we could have seen Q or something more generic, using this particular species worked out because it elaborated on their history and standards. It fleshed them out and gave them some meat as opposed to their TOS counter-parts.

I don’t quite understand why it is Enterprise does such a good job at writing about mortality, but damn . . . it hits it out of the park.
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Old January 24 2010, 12:27 AM   #138
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

Series: Enterprise – Season Four
Episode: “Babel One,” “United,” “The Aenar”
Trek Installment # 86, 87, 88
Grade: B+ (“Babel One”); B+ (“United”); B+ (The Aenar)
Viewing Date: November 26, 2009

So I make it a point to write up a review of an episode immediately after I watch it. Unfortunately, I messed this one up big time, watched these three episodes and forgot. But given the nature of this trilogy, I figured it might be a good idea to just write each review as smaller segments of one big review.

All said, this is the probably largest effort by Enterprise to focus on its second mythology – the building of the universe that we all know and love. Not only do we have a prequel of sorts to “Journey to Babel,” but we also see the beginnings of both the United Federation of Planets and the Romulan War. In an overall sense, these three episodes are perhaps three of the most important in all Trek. And they’re damn good.

I was very satisfied to see Archer in this role, as I don’t think anyone could have pulled this off. Archer acts as the mediator - the center, the peacemaker. He has a great relationship with the Andorians and (more recently) the Vulcans. The Tellarites don’t know him very well, but that’s okay. Could they work together on their own? No. This was Archer.

In addition to the slow build into the Federation, we also go in-depth with the Andorians. I found Andor to be very fascinating. I enjoyed the Ushaan battle, even though it felt like a distraction from the overall plot. It at least showed off Archer’s willingness to see this alliance happen. I also liked the introduction of the Aenar. It was a very different concept and it’s presence added yet another layer to the Andorians.

The Tellarites were also nicely done. Other than that loser bounty hunter back in season two, I’m not very familiar with the Tellarites. The complaints, arguments and insults thrown around were very entertaining.

Then there’s the Romulans. I liked Valdore. He was a bit of bad-ass. Would have been nice to have seen more of him, but . . . we knew where the series was going.

Ultimately, my biggest problem was that we didn’t see much of a fleet battle. We have a fleet and an enemy, but no awesome huge battle. I can live with what we had, though. It was cool anyways – especially with those close-ups from Reed and Trip’s POV.

Some more Vulcans would have been appreciated, too.

On a side-note, it was nice to see Trip and Reed on another adventure, but I felt bad for Trip since things with him and T’Pol have cooled.
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Old January 25 2010, 03:36 AM   #139
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

Series: Enterprise – Season Four
Episode: “Affliction”
Trek Installment # 89
Grade: B-
Viewing Date: November 27, 2009

This episode takes places 145 years from today. Awesome! I guess that means the Klingons are cranky because it’s the day after their Klingon Thanksgiving. If you laugh, that was my joke. If you didn’t, blame my wife; she came up with it.

Anyways, Enterprise revisits the Klingons. This is a touchy subject for Enterprise, as out of all the episodes they’ve been in, there’s only been one good Klingon episode. This one isn’t nearly as insightful as “Judgment,” but it’s certainly not “Marauders” or “Sleeping Dogs.” In terms of the way the Klingons are presented, I do give the producers credit. These Klingons exhibit activities more associated with their 23rd century counterparts. Kidnapping, subterfuge, sabotage, working through proxies . . . these aren’t the 24th century Klingons and they’re not the bumbling bully Klingons we saw earlier in the series. These guys means business, but are doing it 23rd century-style.

In that, I give a tip of the hat.

Now, dealing with Reed’s association with Section 31, it’s a little shoe-horned. I can deal with that, but it just doesn’t feel completely “real” to me. Actually, to be honest, I kind of cringe at it, simply because it’s so forced in there. But whatever – it’s decent for what it is and I like to see Reed struggle with his loyalties.

On a smaller note, I did like seeing T’Pol’s first regular mind meld and Archer’ couching her. I also enjoyed seeing Hernandez, who is one of my favorite secondary characters.
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Old January 25 2010, 04:33 PM   #140
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

Series: Enterprise – Season Four
Episode: “Divergence”
Trek Installment # 90
Grade: C+
Viewing Date: November 27, 2009

While “Affliction” showed us the Empire in transition, “Divergence” just kinda wrapped it up. There was a lack of character building – except for Phlox and Uncle Phil. We go through some exciting battles, hair-brained ship transfers, and lots of drama before we get to what this two parter really wanted us to see: ridge-less Klingons.

Not that I minded and this was among the superior Klingon episodes, but I believe a more interesting idea would have been to tell this story from the Klingons POV. Maybe open with a story set during TOS and have a child getting an injection that will serve as both a vaccine for the plague and will give him ridges. The child asks why this is and we get a story about Starfleet from the Klingons POV. Maybe that’s just me.

Anyways, this was weaker than “Affliction,” but it was fun. The Klingons really came into their own with this episode and we continue to see them develop. I’ll talk more about the Klingons in my season four overview.
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Old January 26 2010, 02:57 PM   #141
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

Series: Enterprise – Season Four
Episode: “Bound”
Trek Installment # 91
Grade: C+
Viewing Date: November 27, 2009

While I thought this episode was fun and had some nice touches, it really failed to deliver anything of substance. I liked that it featured the Orions, which I always felt was an underused species. It was also cool to see Orion Slave Women, although the whole “it’s the men who are slaves” deal is kinda stupid.

In terms of the internal drama with the characters, the off/on relationship of Trip and T’Pol is back on. The scenes with them and T’Pol’s joke in sickbay were among the best. That being said, I thought it would have been more interesting to have Travis in Kelby’s role. I mean that. Wouldn’t it make sense that Travis ends up getting transferred to Engineering when Trip left and maybe was co-heading it with Kelby? And then that would give Travis some ambitions and (GASP) character development.

Oh well. A man can dream.
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Old January 28 2010, 01:12 AM   #142
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

Series: Enterprise – Season Four
Episode: “Demons” and “Terra Prime”
Trek Installment # 92 and 93
Grade: B and A
Viewing Date: November 27, 2009

Because of the nature of these two episodes and the fact that poor Enterprise never did get a real series finale (as “These Are the Voyages. . .” was really bad and I’m saving it for later), I felt that these would work the best together.

First and foremost, I can’t believe how much attention Travis Mayweather got in this episode. Where the hell was this? He was front and center emotionally and action-ly (not a word). He was great in this episode. And so was Hoshi, who got to command Enterprise for a while and did a good job at standing her ground. Archer’s comment about how much she’s grown was appreciated.

Paxton was a very strong villain, though he could have used a little more backstory and motivation. But he was a good example of the hateful, spiteful, and generally ignorant part of humanity. He looked like someone from our time, which I think was done to show how much we’d grown by then. Even his influence represented negative aspects of mankind – cultivating in the death of Ensign Redshirt Traitor.

Samuels was a little one-sided, but was pretty interesting. His transition from self-centered politician to spotlight sharing hero-lover was a good turn. Harris was thankfully not made out to be the super-villain he could have been, and instead gave Reed something interesting to do.

Small moments are what won me over. Phlox’s words to Archer about the crew becoming a family to him were really nice. The aforementioned scenes with Hoshi and Travis were long overdue. Reed . . . uh, well, Reed was the first to get shot on the rescue mission, which was shocking and kinda funny.

Obviously, the core of the story is baby Elizabeth and the Trip/T’Pol relationship. I think these three represented both the growth of the two worlds since “Broken Bow” and their ultimate destiny. The end scene in particular states this, as we have the two comforting each other with Enterprise sailing on.

The best moment came at the end, when Archer gave his best speech ever. It cemented him as the key figure in foundation of the Coalition of Planets, which, as we know, gives way to the United Federation of Planets. That there is the key scene and what pulls it all together.

As a finale, it doesn’t live up to the what the others shows have offered (if we count Star Trek 6 as the finale for TOS, that is). But considering the circumstances, it does do a good job of wrapping up the season and shoving us forward into the future.
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Old January 28 2010, 12:21 PM   #143
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

I like to think of Terra Prime as the 'real' Enterprise finale.

Good write-ups.
What's next, The Cage?
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Old January 28 2010, 07:59 PM   #144
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

Start Wreck wrote: View Post
I like to think of Terra Prime as the 'real' Enterprise finale.

Good write-ups.
What's next, The Cage?
Same here! The Cage is coming, but I've to do a Season Four overview (which is this post), then the series overview, then one more artical before I post my review for The Cage.

------

Season Four Overview

Overall Season Rating: B+
Best Episode: Terra Prime
Best Episode Runner-Up: United
Worst Episode: Storm Front, Part One

I view season four in one of two ways. The first, it serves as a transition between the era it takes places in and the eras to come, solidifying its role as a prequel series. The second, as the last canon Trek to appear before Star Trek 11 and at a time when all Trek seemed hopeless, it kinda became a big fan-wanky exploration of Trek.

This worked for the best for season four, though I was hoping we’d see more of the exploration-type episodes that were more common in seasons one and two. A lot of the species we have seen in season four were those that we’ve seen before – the Andorians, the Klingons, the Romulans, the Vulcans, and even the augments. But that being said, this dove deeper with the Andorians and Vulcans that we’ve gone before and I love that.

The season kicked off with the end of the Temporal Cold War, but with no explanation about it. We never found out who Future Guy was nor was it ever explained why blowing up the temporal conduit ended the entire Temporal Cold War. It ended with disappointment and confusion.

After coming home, the crew took some time to recover before going out and tackling some Augments and stopping a possible war with the Klingons. This arc I found had similarities with the “Terra Prime” one in that they both forced the crew to take a look at their past and try and battle against it from erupting into the present and messing with the galactic future.

The Vulcan arc gave us Vulcans that we know and love and was great. With the except of the Klingon Augment arc and the three stand-alones, the Vulcan arc led into the Romulan arc, which in turn gave rise of the Terra Prime story. Remember the universe building I’ve been talking about? This was it. It showed us more of the Vulcans and Andorians that we’d ever seen, gave plenty of face time with the Tellarites, and showed us a peek of the future.

Character-wise, Archer’s overall storyarc came to an end here. I think by the time he went back out into space in “Borderland,” Archer had found a balance between peace and aggression. Having Surak in his head helped weed out of the rest of his paranoia and resentment towards Vulcans. Archer, as we leave him, is a different man than where he began.

Trip and T’Pol were way too on and off. They had so many talks that in the end, I don’t think that they knew where they were. The last scene in the season of them comforting each other is nice, though, and I really had some hope for them (though according to both “These Are The Voyages . . .” and “The Good That Men Do,” it was for naught).

Phlox had his small moments of characterization, but nothing much. Hoshi had some attention in “Observer Effect” and “Terra Prime.” Travis got nothing until “Demons” and “Terra Prime.” Reed had his conflict of interest in the Klingon Augment arc.

Overall, season four basically issues us forward, ending us far from where we started in season one.

***

Trek species:

Klingons: The Klingons, after nearly declaring war on Earth, were only mainly featured in their augment arc. The augment arc didn’t show us much of the Empire, though one can assume that due to the corruption mentioned in “Judgment” and the expanded use of subterfuge, they have taken yet another step down their path from honored warriors to corrupt soldiers.

Romulans: The Romulans, testing the water and ultimately trying to stop Andor, Earth, Vulcan, and Tellar from uniting, did a fine job of disrupting their peace. For a while . . . until all four worlds got their acts together. But the Romulans are out there and war will come.
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Old January 28 2010, 09:52 PM   #145
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

Sorry, but I found "Demons" and "Terra Prime" to be hopelessly melodramatic and small-thinking. A single laser on a rotating planet can terrorize an entire solar system? The chief engineer of the most prominent ship in the fleet can waltz around spacefarers and not be recognized? Mayweather can experience emotions now?

There was no wonder, no edge and, apart from the Carl Sagan station cameo, barely any wit. I can't speak for most of the rest of the season, but TATV was, imho, a well-deserved gloved slap in the face to this sort of mediocrity.
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Old January 29 2010, 03:07 PM   #146
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

STAR TREK: ENTERPRISE – SERIES REVIEW

NOTE: This review does not include “Regeneration;” “In a Mirror, Darkly . . .” Parts One and Two; and “These Are The Voyages . . .” as these episodes take place later in the overall chronology of Star Trek and will be viewed at a later date.

Overview:
Enterprise is a difficult show. It is, basically, three different shows. The first, encompassing the first two seasons, is a Star Trek trying to get back to its roots. There is a solid attempt to go back to the stand-alone episodes of the original series and Next Generation . . . but with poor results. Enterprise repeats itself – and sometimes other series. There are some great exceptions to this rule, but in an overall sense, it is true. I can’t fault them for giving us some serious action, but as a general rule, the first two seasons are rehashes and attempts to get back to the idea of exploration. But it fails to take advantage of the full potential of so many of its episodes and instead, we get scenes of Trip bitching about hand-rails as opposed to dealing with the complications of having a child with an alien.

Season three takes us into a brand new direction – singular though it might be. The Xindi crisis, while it is difficult to place in the canon, is a shot in the arm for Enterprise and does a good job of changing the overall dynamic of the show. High marks for this new dynamic, though I do have complaints about it.

Season four serves as the major transition between Enterprise and the rest of Trek. In addition to giving us Klingons in transition and laying the foundation for the both the Romulan War and the Federation, it also gives us Organians, pre-Kahns, and human extremists. It does a good job and works well as a final season, though it lacks the core exploration themes that Enterprise was supposed to be all about.

Changes:
Had I been given four seasons of Enterprise to control, I would have played it out differently. There’s nothing wrong with going back to the one-episode exploration that TOS and TNG were good at – but when the series is a prequel, there needs to the more of a mix. The series needed a balance of episodes that went back to the core of Star Trek, doing (again) one-episode explorations and prequel episodes that built into the Star Trek universe we know and love.

The Temporal Cold War needed to be dropped. If it was indeed forced on me, then I would have at least brought it to a satisfying conclusion. The Suliban should have been working for a future Romulan. It makes sense. An unstable Klingon Empire meant one blood enemy the Romulans wouldn’t have to worry about (and they could still make alliances with one side of the Klingon civil war ala “Redemption”). And the Romulan could even get the Suliban involved with battling Starfleet. Adding in Vosk, Nazis, and mobsters was a huge mistake.

Ultimately, the show needed to be a mix of one-shot episodes that were classic Trek and (more) prequel episodes that could have built into the contemporary Trek universe.

Characters:
If Enterprise did one thing right, it was create interesting and exciting characters. I will forever criticize Enterprise’s handling of the Vulcans (in the first three seasons, at least), but I give them credit exploring the Andorians so well and eventually re-examining the Vulcans.

In terms of recurring characters, Shran, Soval, Cutler, Forest, Daniels, Hayes, Koss, T’Les, and Kelby were all unique, fun, and very well-developed. In the case of Shran and Soval, they had more development than Travis and Hoshi at times.

There were also some great villains. Silik will always go down as one of my favorites because he was so different. He wasn’t motivated by revenge like sooooo many other Star Trek villains. Instead, he was a glorified pawn in the Temporal Cold War, not really knowing more than Archer, but at the same time, playing a stronger hand than him.

Degra made a nice transition from villain to hero. Dolim was fun, though brute-ish and sometimes a cliché. Doctor Soong made for an intriguing enemy – as did his Kahn-a-likes, especially Malik. Valdore was an okay bad guy, but didn’t do much else other than spout orders. Paxton, finally, presented us with the worst of humankind and ended up being our last (sorta) enemy of that era.

Enterprise also presented us with some notable guest characters. I could list these, but if you were to read my reviews, you’d know who they are. I should point out Kolos, who was the first Klingon on Enterprise to really give us insight into the Empire.

The one character I wish we had seen again? Klaang. Seriously, this was the Klingon the whole first episode was about and not a peep from since.

As for the main cast . . .

Archer had a definite arc he followed. In the beginning, he was so eager and yet, couldn’t trust Vulcans. Even as T’Pol warmed up to him, Archer often ignored her and leapt into whatever situation was before him. He had set-backs and intense moments of doubt, but even then, he was still more than eager and open-minded. It wasn’t until the Xindi that Archer realized that space was extremely dangerous. But he pulled himself back, moving past all preconceptions about Vulcans thanks to Surak, and by the time he reached the final episode, Archer was a new man. Still eager, still wanting to explore, still fighting for peace, but with reservation, with readiness, and preparation that he lacked early on. Archer became the model that all Starfleet officers would follow.

T’Pol’s arc was different than Archers and mainly dealt with her growing to become one of the crew in a deeper sense. It took some thawing, but by the end of season two, she was there. She went a little overboard in season three, but she had some moments of greatness. By the time she reached the end, she was in love with a human male whose hand she wouldn’t shake in the first episode and she had lost a half-human child. Her arc was about T’Pol finding a home – and getting one aboard Enterprise.

Trip spent most of the first two seasons having adventures . . . until his sister was killed. Trip was a great character, one of my favorites, and was well developed. After Elizabeth was killed, it was all about Trip finding a way to make peace with that. And then it was about him trying to figure out his relationship with T’Pol, which was also left open at the end.

The others didn’t receive nearly as much development. For Phlox, it wasn’t so much as involvement as simply understanding his character and his culture. Hoshi grew up and out of her paranoia, but slowly and in the end, was still very much the same. Reed had to balance his loyalties and his emotions. And Travis . . . uh, flew the ship.

All the same, the best part about Enterprise were its characters. I regret not seeing more of them.

Conclusion:
Enterprise as a whole was at its best when it dealt with the characters. These characters are more grounded to the past than those of their 23rd and 24th century counter-parts. Putting them in space evokes a different drama than in other situations. The characters were what made Enterprise good.

I spoke about Enterprise needing to find a balance between universe-building and exploration and even though it didn’t find that balance, it was still a good ride.

“Broken Bow” presents us with the beginning of Trek. “Terra Prime” propels us forward, past the taint of our ancestors and beginning to make peace with our interstellar neighbors. The two final scenes are probably the best in terms of what is to come. The first one, Archer standing with his crew behind him and delegates from all sorts of worlds (including Earth) convincing them to hold together. The second one, with Trip and T’Pol, comforting each other and hoping for the future – their own and the children of Earth and Vulcan. To see these characters journey was what made Enterprise so good.

It had faults, it had failures, and it had moments of moments of stupidity. But it had moments of excitement, emotion, and energy. For every “Precious Cargo,” there’s a “First Flight.” For every “Extinction,” there’s a “Twilight.” For every “Marauders,” there’s a “Judgment.”

Enterprise may have stumbled in its path, but it picked itself up. And even though we’ll be checking in a few times later on, it’s time to move on.
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Old January 29 2010, 05:48 PM   #147
CKS
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

Captain Kirk gratifies anonymous men in bathrooms.
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Old January 30 2010, 05:25 AM   #148
thew40
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

CKS wrote: View Post
Captain Kirk gratifies anonymous men in bathrooms.
riiiiiight . . .
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Old January 30 2010, 06:50 AM   #149
Gaith
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

thew40 wrote: View Post
If Enterprise did one thing right, it was create interesting and exciting characters.
Really? I thought it had the dullest core cast by a long shot.
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Old January 30 2010, 04:12 PM   #150
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Re: Treking through all Star Trek

Excellent reviews. Agree with most of what you write about Enterprise. Time for another viewing of my cd collection!
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