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Old January 11 2014, 01:36 PM   #188
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Re: TF: The Poisoned Chalice by James Swallow Review Thread (Spoilers!

David Mack wrote: View Post
^ Heck, maybe Andor refers to the homeworld, while Andoria encompasses the homeworld and all its independent protectorates and/or possessions/colonies.
In other words, Andor is the homeworld, and Andoria is the name for the Andorian state?

Possible. ENT seemed to establish that the Andorian state was known as the Andorian Empire, but Christopher's recent Rise of the Federation: A Choice of Futures went out of its way to avoid referring the "Imperial Guard" the way it had been called on ENT, using the term "Andorian Guard" instead; one could speculate that perhaps before joining the Federation, the Andorian Empire changed its name to simply Andoria. (Sort of the way the Dominion of Canada changed its name to just Canada.)

Markonian wrote: View Post
According to the background section of the relevant article on Memory Alpha, Andoria is the name of the Andorian/Aenar homeworld. Andoria is the moon orbiting the gas giant Andor. Thus, in everyday language these terms can be used interchangeably.
That explanation, though, is non-canonical. Which I'm glad of, because I find it highly counter-intuitive; why would the Andorians name the world they're actually from the diminutive of the gas giant it happens to orbit? The ancient Andorians wouldn't have known that their world was orbiting the gas giant; they probably would have thought the gas giant was orbiting their world, the way Humans used to think the Sun revolved around Earth.

So if we insist that the gas giant and the satellite have to share a name structure, it would make more sense to assume that they would have given the gas giant a diminutive version of the name for the satellite, since the satellite would have been the body they'd actually have thought of as the center of the universe.

Still, it all seems much simpler to infer that they're just two names for the same homeworld. This is what Heather Jarman explicitly established in Andor: Paradigm, in a scene where Prynn and Shar are talking. Prynn expresses confusion over the use of the word "Andor," saying she'd grown up hearing it called "Andoria." If I recall the scene correctly, Shar replies that he was surprised when he got to Starfleet Academy and everyone was calling it "Earth;" he'd grown up hearing it referred to as "Terra." It was a cute scene.
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