View Single Post
Old September 25 2013, 04:40 PM   #13
Christopher
Writer
 
Christopher's Avatar
 
Re: Fox Developing "Gotham" Young Jim Gordon Series

FreezeC77 wrote: View Post
Well to be fair a major reason why FOX canceled so many genre shows is because they were one of the few networks actually giving genre shows *A CHANCE*. You'd have the rare show here and there on the other big 3 networks, but it was pretty much lawyer/cop/doctor for a good 10+ years on those networks and only in the past few years have you seen them try genre shows more frequently (Lost being a huge factor there)
Absolutely right. Of all the broadcast networks, FOX and UPN are the ones that have had the highest percentage of genre shows out of their total scripted shows. So naturally they've cancelled the most genre shows, because most shows get cancelled, period. And it's been a decade since Firefly, and different people are running the show now. Last year, ABC, NBC, and The CW all debuted one or more genre shows that they cancelled after just a few weeks, leaving most of their episodes unaired or burning them off months later. FOX hasn't cancelled a genre show with episodes unaired since Tru Calling in 2005. So the old "FOX kills genre shows" meme is outdated. Take an honest look at the current TV landscape and it's clear that genre shows have a better chance on FOX than they do on the other broadcast networks.



Icemizer wrote: View Post
Oh look theres Edward Nigma CSI, The Cobblepot Casino, Isley's floral shop, and on and on. Just name dropping will not keep the fanboys watching this show.
But that's just it -- shows like this are not made for "fanboys," because that's not a large enough audience to sustain a successful television series. The goal with shows like this and Smallville before it is to take a property with a niche appeal and reinvent it to fit a mold that has broader audience appeal, a show that will draw in the general audience that wouldn't watch a straight-up Batman or Superman show. The reason there are so many conventional, formulaic shows on TV is because lots of viewers want them. They draw in large audiences reliably in a way that more exotic concepts like SF or superheroes generally don't. Sure, superheroes are popular now, but even the most successful superhero properties tend to play down the comic-book elements or bend over backward to rationalize them and make them feel more grounded, more accessible to the general audience that's uncomfortable with capes and tights and code names.

Not that I think this is necessarily a good idea, but I have no trouble understanding why network executives would think it's a good idea. A cop show is a safer way to go.
__________________
Christopher L. Bennett Homepage -- Site update 4/8/14 including annotations for Rise of the Federation: Tower of Babel

Written Worlds -- My blog
Christopher is offline   Reply With Quote