View Single Post
Old June 27 2013, 03:58 PM   #109
RandyS
Vice Admiral
 
RandyS's Avatar
 
Location: Randyland
View RandyS's Twitter Profile
Re: creepy encounters with cashiers

thestrangequark wrote: View Post
RandyS wrote: View Post
Sector 7 wrote: View Post
It could be much worse, my friend. My godson has CP & is in a wheelchair [well, now its a Rascal scooter thing]. At the mall or movies, people will just stare. Mostly, it is because they just don't know what to say. Often, they are surprised that he speaks so well... they look at the body and assume he's retarded [or whatever the current PC term is].
As somebody who also has CP and uses a wheelchair (part time anyway). I can relate friend. I don't notice getting stared at all that much, but how some people react to me.....ugh. And I will NEVER understand the whole "speaks so well" nonsense. I've been complimented more than once on how well I express myself despite being disabled. As if they can't see that the CP affected my LEGS, not my MIND. But, it DOES perfectly demonstrate the conflicting nature of the current generations "values".
What? Are you trying to say that the current generation treats disabled people worse than past generations? Are you crazy?

It sucks that people have treated you the way they have. Obviously I cannot understand what it is like for you, but I have some idea from starting life with a disability (I was deaf as a child, but my hearing was restored fully by the time I was 12, and my speech was almost normal by the time I was about 10), growing up with a disabled mother (who has both physical and mental disabilities), and working with disabled children. While I would generally argue stagnation -- that there are assholes and idiots in equal proportion in any generation -- the treatment of the disabled is one of the few areas where society has progressed rapidly in only a few generations. While disablism is obviously still a big problem, things are vastly improved compared to the last generation and the generations before.
No. My point was that some people hear "cerebral palsy", and, as another poster said, automatically think "retardation". There are degrees cerebral palsy. it doesn't always mean being retarded. In my case, that is NOT the case. It's not always the same. When I was born, I suffered brain damage yes, but it limited my ability to walk, not think or speak. Sometimes when people hear that I have cerebral palsy, they say, "well, you express yourself quite well for somebody in your condition.". This shows their ignorance and often, dismissive attitude toward things they don't understand, or don't want to understand, and it's just hard for me sometimes not to get irritated with that. They think they're complimenting me, but to my ears, it doesn't always sound that way.

And you're right about one thing. Things HAVE improved alot for the disabled since I was a kid. But we still have a hell of a long way to go.
RandyS is online now   Reply With Quote