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Old March 20 2013, 01:30 AM   #47
feek61
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Location: The Sunshine State
Re: Commodore Wesley confuses me

Robert Comsol wrote: View Post
feek61 wrote: View Post
Happened to a friend of mine! He was the captain of a Los Angles Class Sub and while he was asleep whomever was in command at the time ran into a Japanese ship due to the venturi effect (basically the sub got sucked into the ship as the ship passed over it) and my friend was relieved of command and shortly thereafter left the Navy. Keep in mind before he was a captain of the vessel he was the chief tactician for an admiral at the pentagon. He had a great reputation and knew the right people but in the end it just didn't matter. The commander is where the buck stops.
Ouch! So you are telling us the modern US Navy still clings to this outdated, rigid "the captain is responsible for everything (i.e. every thing)" 300 year-old naval "tradition"?

This would be rather stupid, considering the costs the taxpayer invested into the training and education of your friend from an economical point of view (from a human point of view it's awful: so you have to be an a**hole to make sure the crew will do its job 100% right but in return will hate and despise you - unless you are a born and natural leader?).

At least, TOS suggests progress in the far future: In "The Doomsday-Machine" Kirk tries to persuade Matt Decker to return to the Enterprise - "We need your experience!"

Bob
That's exactly what happened; a man with a great career future destroyed by something really out of his control. Matt was out of the Navy within a year after incident; disgraced. Here are the details of the collision:

"In January, 2007, there was a minor collision between an American nuclear sub (the USS Newport News) and 1,100 foot long, 300,000 ton tanker (the Mogamigawa) in the Persian Gulf. There was some damage to the ship, in the form of a 108 foot long tear in the rear hull. The tear was four inches wide, and letting water in. The U.S. sub had its sonar dome, in the bow, badly damaged. But both vessels were able to make it back to port under their own power. An investigation revealed that the tanker was passing safely over the 360 foot long Newport News, but was going at such "high speed" (probably about 35 kilometers an hour), that a sucking effect was created, that pulled the 6,300 ton sub up until its bow banged against the bottom of the passing tanker. The Newport News was moving south, through the Straits of Hormuz, as was the Japanese ship. The tanker carried a crew of 24, the sub has 127 sailors on board."


This is what a fellow commander said about Matt:
"I do know and did serve with the Captain. He was a very thorough and methodical young Man. Smart as a whip. Loved by his Men. Wish I could say I taught him everything he knows, but it ain't so. He knew a lot more about some things than I did. He's been there almost two years. And I hope his reputation survives this as well. Whatever happens, he will always have a place at Subsunk's table."

No question; the captain is responsible in today's Navy no matter what. Matt was allowed to get the ship into port and then never set foot on her again. Sorry for the diversion, lol, now back on track!!
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Last edited by feek61; March 20 2013 at 01:47 AM.
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