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Old March 5 2013, 03:20 PM   #185
Robert Comsol
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Re: The Constellation's registry number

GSchnitzer wrote: View Post
"...Khan studying with great concentration. He pushes a button. Another transparency appears: a chapter heading, reading: BASIC SPECIFICATIONS, CONSTITUTION CLASS STAR SHIP. ... He pushes a button, stares back up at his screen...A chapter heading: Basic Propulsion Systems, Constitution Class Star Ship."

I guess it's debatable if this actually means that the Enterprise itself was meant to be one of these Constitution-class ships that Khan was reading about. (Personally, I think that is exactly what was meant, but certainly anyone, Greg Jein or Bjo Trimble included, could be forgiven for leaping to the crazy conclusion that is what the "Space Seed" script intended.)
Fair enough.

But since Khan claims to be an engineer of the 20th Century who has at least 200 years to catch up, he probably felt like Charles Tucker in "In A Mirror, Darkly" who felt like a steamboat mechanic confronted with an interplanetary spacecraft when he had to figure out how the Defiant works (and he's from the 22nd Century, correct?).

Apparently Khan needs to study the evolution history towards the Enterprise to understand how warp drive, matter-antimatter reactors and all the lot works, which includes studying and understanding previous starship designs and their innovations.

Since there is nowhere an explicit line stating that the Enterprise belongs to the Constitution Class (on the contrary, I believe the script would have stated "basic specifications and propulsion systems of a starship like the Enterprise", especially since "Constitution Class" had never been mentioned before, and is later nowhere mentioned in The Making of Star Trek which exclusively refers to "Starship Class" and "Enterprise Class").
I will not exclude the possibility that "Constitution Class" might have been a candidate, but its lack of appearance in The Making of Star Trek, sanctioned by Gene Roddenberry, and opposite the term "Enterprise Class" suggests it had fallen out of favor by the powers / producers that be.

GSchnitzer wrote: View Post
"The Enterprise is known to be a Constitution Class ship."

So, it's not like he just made it up himself. It was already "known" before he wrote about it. (In fact, he even cites "'Space Seed' Scene 44" in his article.) To Bjo Trimble's credit, shew knew as well, and even put this "fact" in her Concordance years before Greg Jein wrote his article.
"The Enterprise is known to be an Enterprise Class ship". I can just make up the same kind of claim, it's easy. The difference here is
  • My claim is backed by Bob Justman and what Stephen E. Whitfield compiled in The Making of Star Trek.
  • My claim is backed up by Walter Matt Jefferies who stated that the Enterprise was meant to be the first bird, the first in the (its) series.
Where the whole thing really gets interesting is this: In his treatise Greg Jein refers to the "Space Seed" scene but he doesn't take advantage of it. Did he also feel that Khan was studying the evolution towards the Enterprise?
His "proof" that the Enterprise was a Constitution Class starship was the MK IX/01 primary phaser schematic ("01" = "1701")!

Anyway, the treatise is available for anybody to read and everybody can make up his own mind, what to think of it.

The reason why we are having this debate again, is that several people in this thread found fault with "Starship Class", despite that being the only official and readable display in the original series.

Sorry, it's a little like "do you believe what you see, or do you believe what others tell you". I guess we can at least agree that the Enterprise is not a member of the "Constellation Class" (although "Connie" was the nickname of Lockheed's airplane Super Constellation, but that's a different story).

Bob
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