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Old March 5 2013, 01:43 PM   #41
Cake
Lieutenant
 
Re: Saldana: Uhura-Spock

serenitytrek1 wrote: View Post
Shazam! wrote: View Post
The Spock / Uhura thing is a load of forced melodrama, pandering to a tween audience conditioned to the female lead falling for the emotionally distant handsome male.

It's a lazy attempt at giving the Uhura character a 3rd dimension and probably more insulting to the character than any of the lowest Uhura moments TOS presented us with.

I kind of disagree; I think the writers of trek 09 had an obligation to attract a female audience by putting a romance in the film.
Women (and men) either like science fiction and may therefore consider watching Star Trek, or they don't and no romance will convince them otherwise. Someone who is into romantic movies has much better alternatives. There are so many movies out there, where everything revolves around a love story, where it is the focus of the movie.


Malaika wrote: View Post
Shazam! wrote: View Post
The Spock / Uhura thing is a load of forced melodrama, pandering to a tween audience conditioned to the female lead falling for the emotionally distant handsome male.

It's a lazy attempt at giving the Uhura character a 3rd dimension and probably more insulting to the character than any of the lowest Uhura moments TOS presented us with.
so what Spock finally getting the girl could be pandering to socially awkward nerds that dream to get the hottest girl for once

the old " pandering to" argument...
girls only like romance, the fanboys only wants actions and don't want the girl to distract the guys from their videogames.. what next? who wants to add more stereotypes?
up this point breaking them up would be as fan pandering as keeping them together

fyi, most of the shippers in the trek fandom, that are women, are slash fans anyway...
Slash shippers dominate a lot of fandoms. I could name tons of other fandoms, where a non canon slash ship is much more popular than a canon straight ship. The Star Trek fandom is only one of many. Which proves again, that the argument, that they had to add a romance into the movie to attract female viewers is nonsense. If Spock/Uhura is such a huge draw to women, there would be much more S/U shippers out there. I think the number of women, who watched the last Star Trek movie ONLY because they heard of the Spock/Uhura romance, is very tiny. I think nearly all woman who have seen it in the cinema would have watched it without Spock/Uhura, too.

I think they added the romance, because it is one way to emotionally connect characters with each other. Other ways are for example family bonds and friendships, which they have also shown in the movie. If a romance is done well, it can add to the personality of the characters in question, makes them more interesting. The opposite can happen of course, too, which I think was the case in the last movie.

Personally I felt that Spock was acting very human in the last movie. The romance was one reason for it among others. If they go even further this way in the next movie, he will be an alien only on paper, which would be a bad development in my opinion. The rest of the main characters are already full humans, they shouldn't eliminate all Vulcan behavioural characteristics from Spock. For example making out in public in front of an audience feels really not Vulcan to me. After all the main difference between Vulcans and humans are, that the Vulcans are suppressing their emotions and don't show them openly all the time.

The S/U romance helped to increase Uhura's screentime, but unfortunately she is also the perfect example of this trope now, which I hate:

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.ph...fettePrinciple

The Smurfette Principle is the tendency for works of fiction to have exactly one female amongst an ensemble of male characters, in spite of the fact that roughly half of the human race is female. Unless a show is purposefully aimed at a female viewing audience, the main characters will tend to be disproportionately male. Said only woman will almost always be used as half of a romance subplot.
It just can't get more cliche than to only have one important female character and then to pair her up with one of the male main characters.

They didn't bother to do this:

Why does this trope happen? Often, the problem lies with the source material the work's an adaptation of something written or created decades before equal recognition for women started to gain momentum. Sometimes, however, writers will try to correct this problem by inserting a few more female characters or at least an Affirmative Action Girl.
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