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Old February 20 2013, 01:18 AM   #7
Maxwell Everett
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Re: Generations photography

indolover wrote: View Post
The photography used in Star Trek Generations seemed to be different to the series (,i.e. photography in the filmmaking sense, not taking still photographs).

The bridge for one had less focus on the panels and more on the characters. the lighting used was also darker. Was this deliberate, in order to give the film a different feel?
Well, Generations was lensed with anamorphic glass, just like all the other Star Trek films with the exception of The Undiscovered Country (which was shot in the Super-35 format which uses spherical lenses). Anamorphic lenses compress the image recorded on the motion picture film in the horizontal dimension by a factor of 2, resulting in an aspect ratio of approximately 1.20:1. When the film is shown in the theater (back when 35mm film was the norm!) a corresponding anamorphic lens turned 90 pulled the image back out into the intended 2.40:1 aspect ratio.

The anamorphic format offers the cinematographer twice the angle of view horizontally while giving up half the normal depth of field of a spherical lens (at large apertures this is known as shallow depth of field, where the area of sharp focus is a narrow plane -- objects in front of or behind this plane are blurred).

To give you an example, in Super-35 (framed for 2.40 extraction like The Undiscovered Country) if the cinematographer used an 18mm lens for a wide shot, in 35mm anamorphic, he or she would need to use a 40mm lens. This is because an anamorphic lens has double the horizontal view of the same focal length in spherical... and the longer the focal length (i.e. the longer the lens) the shallower the depth of field. Hence, objects in the background are more blurred.
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