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Old September 26 2012, 09:52 AM   #30
iguana_tonante
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Location: Italy, EU
Re: officers are called 'sir'

Mr. Laser Beam wrote: View Post
Third: Strange as it may seem, there are - or were, I don't know if this shit still goes on - some extremely radical feminist groups who make up words like "womyn" and "herstory" because they don't like any word with "man" or "his" in it.
Oh, those crazy feminists! No mention of any gender issue might go without dutifully pointing out the crazy of them! I mean, that's crazies' crazy, isn't it? Oh, the crazies!

T'Girl wrote: View Post
I very commonly refer to people as sir (or ma'am), it's how I was raised. I use it just about daily with my male friends. Saying something like "Sir, you are wrong," just rolls off the tongue.
I think you are agreeing with horatio here, that "Sir" is used to express a distance with the other speaker.

T'Girl wrote: View Post
horatio83 wrote: View Post
it is a stupid word from aristocratic times and deserves to die out.
It is even more widely used in Latin America countries, not referring to someone (especially if they are older) as Seņor or Seņora is very disrespectful.
As I understand it, and if the usage is similar to the Italian Signore/Signora, the meaning of Seņor/Seņora is more akin to "Mr/Ms" than "Sir/Ma'am" (even if the ultimately share the same etymological root, from Latin Senior, "elder").

T'Girl wrote: View Post
horatio83 wrote: View Post
T'Girl wrote: View Post
not referring to someone (especially if they are older) as Seņor or Seņora is very disrespectful.
sir has more to do with knights
Seņor can mean Mister or Sir. It never means "Knight."
Exactly. I think that's what horatio was pointing out (that "Sir" brings a connotation of "knightood", or aristocratic elitism, whereas "Mister" do not).


magarity wrote: View Post
The use of "Mister" to Saavik was completely correct and thus far from cringeworthy. The purpose is to be the exact opposite of misogynic because to refer to all officers with the same term is a psycological reinforcement of equality.
By using a masculine term? I doubt it. If the purpose is expressing equality with no paternalistic subtext, then why they don't use a feminine term? No difference, right? I bet most male officers would disagree being called "Ma'am".
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