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Old November 30 2010, 01:58 AM   #1
jefferiestubes8
Commodore
 
Location: New York City
a la carte programming - TV

a la carte programming — the ability to subscribe to and pay for individual channels rather than programming packages. But providers are unlikely to move away from the profitable, entrenched model of pricing tiers.
Allowing the consumer to pick channels rather than packages hasn't happened yet...
And this is not cable or satellite or IPTV specific.


Perhaps a tier of the future could be VOD-only, where you purchase programs either individually or on a metered basis rather than accept them in a linear stream.
http://paidcontent.org/article/419-w...-pandoras-box/

Apple has also held talks with programmers, but faced resistance industry-wide over its plans to offer a lower-cost subscription TV plan,
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUST...9?pageNumber=2

Microsoft is in development on a new subscription-based TV service on its Xbox gaming console for 2012 and beyond.
it could sell more individual channels, such as an HBO or Showtime, directly to subscribers. It already has Walt Disney Co's ESPN on the Xbox Live online service.
according to the article.

That isn’t to say the strategy doesn’t have potential. In the UK, SkyTV has offered its Sky Player via the Xbox since 2008, allowing subscribers and non-subscribers with a broadband connection to access SkyTV content.
Rather than emulating Google’s (so far shaky) strategy with Google TV, Microsoft would work with networks and media companies to offer content.
http://mashable.com/2010/11/29/microsoft-iptv/

the advocate believes the Federal Communications Commission should get involved.
http://www.dailycomet.com/article/20...1275?p=4&tc=pg


The FCC is what it may take. In 2006
the FCC fixated on the possibility of allowing consumers to choose their channels
http://paidcontent.org/article/419-w...-pandoras-box/

a decade ago you couldn’t imagine buying more than a few singles over a full album, now the album as an art form is all but dead. For better or worse, the “channel” – meaning a group of programs that appear one after the other interspersed with commercials – may be going away.
http://techcrunch.com/2010/11/29/mic...-up-broadcast/

Hey guys shall we discuss the great possibilities of a la carte programming?
I really don't think commercials will be going away since the whole idea of Hulu Plus was to get you to pay for content not to make the advertising go away...
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