The Trek BBS

The Trek BBS (http://www.trekbbs.com/index.php)
-   Science and Technology (http://www.trekbbs.com/forumdisplay.php?f=36)
-   -   Strong gravity (http://www.trekbbs.com/showthread.php?t=94337)

Supreme Admiral May 26 2009 11:34 PM

Strong gravity
 
Out of my curiosity..how does that effect strong gravity on humans on other planets? Could we possible to survive on other planets with strong gravity or not?

RobertVA May 27 2009 05:45 AM

Re: Strong gravity
 
"Strong" isn't very specific. Would that be 1.5 G, 2G, 3G or more?

The ability to function for long periods would probably be influenced by the individual's age, their amount of experience in the high G environment and their physical fitness. I would expect animal tests in centrifuges before humans were exposed to such conditions.

Even healthy adults might need some assistance getting blood back up to the heart from the feet with more than marginally stronger gravity.

I'm not aware of any place in this solar system with higher surface gravity than Earth other than the gas giants, where gravity is so strong human survival would probably be impossible.

Maurice May 27 2009 09:43 AM

Re: Strong gravity
 
In the old book "Habitable Planets for Man" they discuss G-force stress tests and hypothesize that 1.5Gs is the maximum a human could tolerate, but that it would have negative effects because the heart would have to work harder for one thing. Alos, falling could be potentially fatal because the higher acceleration under higher gravity means you'd hit the ground with more speed and more force. I can dig out the book if you want some specifics.

Deckerd May 27 2009 10:28 AM

Re: Strong gravity
 
I love the idea that there's an old book called Habitable Planets for Man. It's just funny.

All Seeing Eye May 27 2009 12:06 PM

Re: Strong gravity
 
Quote:

RobertVA wrote: (Post 3011953)
"Strong" isn't very specific. Would that be 1.5 G, 2G, 3G or more?

I thought Earths Gravity was 9G. :confused:

Jadzia May 27 2009 12:13 PM

Re: Strong gravity
 
Quote:

Tachyon Shield wrote: (Post 3012405)
Quote:

RobertVA wrote: (Post 3011953)
"Strong" isn't very specific. Would that be 1.5 G, 2G, 3G or more?

I thought Earths Gravity was 9G. :confused:

You're thinking of the average gravitational acceleration on the earth's surface surface, which is 9.8 metres per second per second, which defines 1G.

JoeZhang May 27 2009 12:15 PM

Re: Strong gravity
 
There was a really interesting BBC documentary a couple of years ago about the effects of gravity on evolution. Even a little stronger or a little weaker would have resulted in some radically different animals.

backstept May 27 2009 12:39 PM

Re: Strong gravity
 
Quote:

Tachyon Shield wrote: (Post 3012405)
Quote:

RobertVA wrote: (Post 3011953)
"Strong" isn't very specific. Would that be 1.5 G, 2G, 3G or more?

I thought Earths Gravity was 9G. :confused:

maybe you were thinking of how fast things accelerate when they fall, which is 9.81m/s

Maurice May 27 2009 08:45 PM

Re: Strong gravity
 
Quote:

Deckerd wrote: (Post 3012300)
I love the idea that there's an old book called Habitable Planets for Man. It's just funny.

TGT pointed out to me that Stephen Dole's "Planets for Man" (aka "Habitable Planets for Man") is available as a free download from Rand.org. I first learned about the book because it is cited in the TNG Writer's Technical Guide. I used it in designing the solar system builder portion of the computer game Rules of Engagement back in 1991.


The book is out of date in some ways, particularly related to theories about planet arrangement around stars, but a lot of the underlying logic and research still stands especially concerning the human animal in different gravities, why planets have to have short day-night cycles, etc.

Meredith May 28 2009 04:08 AM

Re: Strong gravity
 
I know people who already weigh 2x times as much as they should and they don't have any problems getting around. It would be like serious weight training with weights on all of the time. I think 2X gravity would be livable, though it would either strain your heart, or you would have really good cardio health because of it!

Asbo Zaprudder May 28 2009 10:25 AM

Re: Strong gravity
 
Terraform the settlers by using genetic engineering, or select colonists from the existing tails of the gene pool distribution in the appropriate phenotype dimensions.

Maurice May 29 2009 08:42 AM

Re: Strong gravity
 
Quote:

Meredith wrote: (Post 3015707)
I know people who already weigh 2x times as much as they should and they don't have any problems getting around. It would be like serious weight training with weights on all of the time. I think 2X gravity would be livable, though it would either strain your heart, or you would have really good cardio health because of it!

Weighing twice as much as you should isn't the same as the increased acceleration of higher gravity, which means impacts are more severe, etc.

Jadzia May 29 2009 11:04 AM

Re: Strong gravity
 
Quote:

DS9Sega wrote: (Post 3020265)
Weighing twice as much as you should isn't the same as the increased acceleration of higher gravity, which means impacts are more severe, etc.

Also in a 2G environment, your blood pressure might be doubled in order to pull it up from your feet and get enough flowing to your brain. 240/160 would be a bit of a worry.

oponda2009 May 29 2009 12:29 PM

Re: Strong gravity
 
Gravity dictates the orbits of the planets around the sun. By measuring those orbits, you can calculate the planet's gravity. Here on earth, we have a normal gravitational force.
By the way, the earth's gravitational pull does not "twist" something in orbit - the force it exerts is directly toward the center of the earth, and would be the same whether the earth was rotating or not.

RobertVA May 29 2009 09:48 PM

Re: Strong gravity
 
Quote:

oponda2009 wrote: (Post 3020506)
Gravity dictates the orbits of the planets around the sun. By measuring those orbits, you can calculate the planet's gravity. Here on earth, we have a normal gravitational force.
By the way, the earth's gravitational pull does not "twist" something in orbit - the force it exerts is directly toward the center of the earth, and would be the same whether the earth was rotating or not.

No. the velocity and orbital radius of planets orbiting the Sun has MUCH more to do with the mass of the Sun. The mass of the planets does create small but detectable shifts in the the orbital trajectories of other planets. If two planets had overlapping apogees and perigees, over a multi-million year period they would probably have occasions when they pass within a few million miles of each other, producing major shifts in their orbits.


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:29 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
FireFox 2+ or Internet Explorer 7+ highly recommended.