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-   -   Ok, silly transporter question... (http://www.trekbbs.com/showthread.php?t=83178)

Plecostomus February 18 2009 10:37 PM

Ok, silly transporter question...
 
Can they lock on to a huge swarm of bees and beam them up and flood the ship with 'em? Or do the safety systems disarm the stingers before they remateralize?

(Ok Paul I posted it, now pay up!)

miraclefan February 18 2009 10:51 PM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
Quote:

Plecostomus wrote: (Post 2628406)
Can they lock on to a huge swarm of bees and beam them up and flood the ship with 'em? Or do the safety systems disarm the stingers before they remateralize?

(Ok Paul I posted it, now pay up!)

:guffaw:I guess it all depends if the safety systems are online or not.:guffaw:( CAN NOT BELIVE I ANSWERD THIS QUESTION! )

JNG February 18 2009 10:51 PM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
The stingers are physical features; I don't imagine the transporter would monkey with the pattern that way, any more than it would remove the teeth and fingernails of a hostile humanoid being beamed in.

Questions about venom aspects and stuff are harder to answer. Could you beam in a poisonous snake and have it devenomed in mid-transport? I feel like the answer is probably no, due to relatively tight time constraints while a subject is being transported, but such strange applications of known Trek tech are a possibility in the future of that universe.

Plecostomus February 18 2009 10:57 PM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
Quote:

miraclefan wrote: (Post 2628461)
Quote:

Plecostomus wrote: (Post 2628406)
Can they lock on to a huge swarm of bees and beam them up and flood the ship with 'em? Or do the safety systems disarm the stingers before they remateralize?

(Ok Paul I posted it, now pay up!)

:guffaw:I guess it all depends if the safety systems are online or not.:guffaw:( CAN NOT BELIVE I ANSWERD THIS QUESTION! )

I only posted it because $5 was on the table... now in my pocket. :lol:

ancient February 18 2009 11:52 PM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
Since the transporter has to scan and account for everything down to the sub-atomic level, any kind of physical manipulation is possible with a proactive and smart enough computer.

That'll be five dollars.

Plecostomus February 19 2009 12:05 AM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
Actually the question was whether or not I'd post a dumbass technobabble question or not. Which I did. Hey $5 is cheeseburger dinner and soda for me. WOOT!

Myasishchev February 19 2009 05:12 AM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
I'd have done it for $1.

shanejayell February 19 2009 05:42 AM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
Quote:

Myasishchev wrote: (Post 2629933)
I'd have done it for $1.

That's cause you're cheap and easy.

:rommie:

Myasishchev February 19 2009 06:00 AM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
I'm where supply meets demand.

SicOne February 19 2009 06:01 AM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
I would imagine there are people at Starfleet Security whose sole purpose is to sit around and think of these kind of scenarios, then arrange with the people who program the transporters to do their bidding.

Such a scenario would be if, for whatever reason, one were to need to beam up a live mugato, a pre-existing transporter subroutine may either beam out the venom in the gland, or may beam into the gland a venom nullifier. Granted, it probably wouldn't take away a lot of the lethality index in dealing with a pissed-off mugato, but at least the CMO wouldn't have to deal with the venom aspect as she's removing the redshirt's head from his rectum after the mugato shoved it up there.

Myasishchev February 19 2009 06:25 AM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
It's probably for stuff like this that they actually have a transporter operator.

It's only unexpected situations where the parameters have to be changed (swarm of bees, mugatos) that seem to really require a transporter operator. Although he or she might just be really adept at putting in the proper coordinates so as not to beam into a wall*, this seems more likely to be computerized than the executive decision "should bacterium x be put on the filter list, or is it a helpful species that allows the Alienites to digest their food?"

*They make hay about this, but there's obviously some kind of pushing mechanism to the transporter that pushes matter out of the way at the assembly point. Otherwise everyone would've died in the first episode from nitrogen narcosis, if not spontaneously combusted.

SicOne February 19 2009 08:14 AM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
I am thinking some kind of subspace force beam that comes down from the transporter emitter on the ship to the beam-in point (and subspace, because I don't see the ship punching microholes in whatever materials are line-of-sight between the ship and the beam-in point), then said beam widens out to some two-foot radius and creates a human-sized cylinder, then the transported matter is sent down via the subspace wave to be recomposited as human.

Have we discussed in the BBS how this all works?

As far as the swarm of bees thing works, that's actually an ingenious idea...if an intruder were wearing some kind of anti-tech or anti-transporter thingy, where they couldn't transport him into a holding cell or cargo bay, and couldn't errect shields around him (and now I'm remembering the Hirogen attack on Enterprise-E from the Destiny novels), they could beam up an insect swarm to occupy the intruder.

The closest thing to a swarm of bees I've seen transporterd was from the TNG episode "Power Play", where they beamed up a big swarm of "lost souls" into a cargo bay.

bryce February 20 2009 06:13 PM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
Quote:

SicOne wrote: (Post 2630490)
I am thinking some kind of subspace force beam that comes down from the transporter emitter on the ship to the beam-in point (and subspace, because I don't see the ship punching microholes in whatever materials are line-of-sight between the ship and the beam-in point), then said beam widens out to some two-foot radius and creates a human-sized cylinder, then the transported matter is sent down via the subspace wave to be recomposited as human.

Have we discussed in the BBS how this all works?

For some reason I always assumed that's what the annular confinement beam was for - but I looked it up on Memory Alpha and aparently I was wrong.

But such a component to the transporter beam *must* exist...I remember an early Enterprise episode where they triend to beam up a crewmember in a windstorm and he arrived with all sorts of leaves and debris incorporated into his body...later transporters would'nt do that, otherwise Checkov & Terrel would have arrived on Ceti-Apha 5 full of sand! (Not to mention everybody who attemped to travel via transporter dying of painful embolisms!)

I always figured that tube of light you see in the TMP & Generations beaming effect was a visible version of that "shield"...

Mike Farley February 22 2009 08:18 AM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
Would it even be feasible to beam up a swarm of bees? I mean, while they are physically small, each bee is a individual, complex, living creature. Every single one would have to be individually scanned, broken down, and its pattern stored (albeit briefly). Does the transporter have anywhere close to enough memory to beam dozens--maybe hundreds--of individual creatures up at the same time?

Just because the creature is physically much tinier than a humanoid doesn't mean that the computer file that descibes it is proportionally smaller.

(I may be overthinking this.)

JNG February 22 2009 08:26 AM

Re: Ok, silly transporter question...
 
I think an individual bee would be notably less complex and the computer processing required notably less intensive, but you're right to note that this might not mean you could beam a swarm of them up just because they'd physically fit into the space where a small number of transporter pads can grab a few 50th-percentile humanoids at a time. The mass isn't going to be the problem in the first place (hey, junky Klingon transporters beamed WHALES in), so there have to be other issues, and those would probably come into play beyond a certain number of bees.

How many does it take before it's a swarm? :)


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