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-   -   Why don't cricket stadia have rooves? (http://www.trekbbs.com/showthread.php?t=222118)

picsiskvinechef August 7 2013 05:23 PM

Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
It's 2013. Why should any Test match, or even one day or T20, be called off due to rain?

Many other sports have stadia with rooves, so why not cricket?

The only issue I can see is cost. The UK (counting for England as England is not a sovereign state) and Australia could afford it. Whilst India is still poor, it's private sector may fund it due to the sport's popularity there. However, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Jamaica, St. Kitts, etc. could not for sure.

MacLeod August 7 2013 06:22 PM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
How many Stadia of ball and bat games be they Baseball, Cricket etc.. have Roofs?

Sure the centre court at Wimbledon has one.

SmoothieX August 9 2013 08:20 AM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
Most stadiums don't have a roof. Some sports gets called off due to rain. I don't see the big deal.

MacLeod August 9 2013 08:58 AM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
Not many sporting events are called off due to rain in the UK. Football matches will be played in the raineven possible snow, Motorsports (i.e. F1) still take place if it's raining. Of course if it's torrential rain they might be postponed

Kestrel August 9 2013 05:53 PM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
Roofs.

Roger Wilco August 9 2013 06:32 PM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
What I don't understand is why so many American Football stadiums don't have roofs for the fans at least. I mean, if it's a cheap stadium or an old one I guess that's understandable but to spend literally billions of dollars on a new stadium, like the New Meadowlands and the new 49ers stadium, and not even protect the fans from rain and sun is just baffling to me.

If there have been built more than a handful of soccer stadiums in Europe with >20.000 capacity in the last decade without at least partial roofing, I would be very surprised. I just don't get why that doesn't seem to matter at all in the US.

Avon August 9 2013 08:00 PM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
roofs

scotpens August 9 2013 09:03 PM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
Quote:

Roger Wilco wrote: (Post 8488888)
What I don't understand is why so many American Football stadiums don't have roofs for the fans at least. I mean, if it's a cheap stadium or an old one I guess that's understandable but to spend literally billions of dollars on a new stadium, like the New Meadowlands and the new 49ers stadium, and not even protect the fans from rain and sun is just baffling to me.

If there have been built more than a handful of soccer stadiums in Europe with >20.000 capacity in the last decade without at least partial roofing, I would be very surprised. I just don't get why that doesn't seem to matter at all in the US.

American football fans will sit and watch the game in rain, sleet, snow or hail because they're not wussies! :p

But really -- "rooves"?

Mr. Laser Beam August 10 2013 12:33 AM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
The reason why most football stadia in the US don't have "rooves" :D is mostly because it's still possible to play football in any kind of weather (unlike, say, baseball, which can't be played in the rain because the ball is so small and flies around so fast that the possibility of injury is greater), so they don't put a priority on it. Any time stadium designers can save a buck or two, they do it, and this is just an example of that - football can be played in the rain, and fans will still watch it that way, so having a roof isn't considered top priority.

Jono August 10 2013 09:41 AM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
Well, in Australia they do play some cricket in a stadium with a retractable roof, Docklands Stadium in Melbourne. It isn't a "cricket ground", but they do play some T20s there. I think the rule is when the roof is closed if the batsman hits the ball into the roof, if it hits a part of the retractable roof it is called a dead ball.

Most cricket grounds are completely unsuitable to just throw a roof on and I think you are underestimating just how expensive it might be to convert a single ground into a ground with a retractable roof. They are upgrading a stadium in Sydney that will include a retractable roof and it costs $200 million and it is just a footy stadium, so it is a bit smaller than your typical cricket ground.

Plus how will a closed roof impact the game? Would it give an unfair advantage to say the batting side if they get a day under the roof and in the next innings the other side doesn't get it? Might not matter for T20s or 1 dayers as you can close the roof for the whole game easily, but what about test matches that last over multiple days?

Avon August 10 2013 10:25 AM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
from wikipedia: A more realistic test-match stadium would have more than 20,000 square yards of grass. In contrast an association football field needs only about 9,000 square yards of grass

therefore, you'd need a much bigger rhoofe which would cost loads more.

stoneroses August 10 2013 06:12 PM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
Sour grapes

marksound August 10 2013 07:24 PM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
Just curious, does cricket generate enough revenue to justify a covered stadium? I have no idea, so I ask.

American baseball is played in warm weather months, and rainouts are relatively few. Football in the US, on the other hand, is played in fall and winter months in various climates across the country. A team might play in near zero temps with snow on the ground in Chicago or Pittsburgh or Boston one week, then play in springlike weather in southern California or south Texas or Florida the next.

A covered stadium can cost billions. Take a look at the state of the art Cowboys Stadium in the Dallas metroplex. http://stadium.dallascowboys.com/

I don't have an answer to the OP question, but a covered stadium would have to be able to justify its existence and eventually pay for itself.

SmoothieX August 10 2013 07:26 PM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
As someone who has been to a bunch of football game in all sorts of shitty weather, there is something fun about going to a mudfest or snow bowl, if only to make fun of the fans who didn't check the weather before getting in the car. The elements are part of the game and the teams need to adapt accordingly.

Baseball in the rain is just a slick mess.

RoJoHen August 10 2013 08:52 PM

Re: Why don't cricket stadia have rooves?
 
Quote:

scotpens wrote: (Post 8489428)
Quote:

Roger Wilco wrote: (Post 8488888)
What I don't understand is why so many American Football stadiums don't have roofs for the fans at least. I mean, if it's a cheap stadium or an old one I guess that's understandable but to spend literally billions of dollars on a new stadium, like the New Meadowlands and the new 49ers stadium, and not even protect the fans from rain and sun is just baffling to me.

If there have been built more than a handful of soccer stadiums in Europe with >20.000 capacity in the last decade without at least partial roofing, I would be very surprised. I just don't get why that doesn't seem to matter at all in the US.

American football fans will sit and watch the game in rain, sleet, snow or hail because they're not wussies! :p

Yeah! Sitting around in shitty weather is part of the experience! Suck it up, bring a poncho, and have some beer!


But also...

"Rooves" is correct.
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rooves


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