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Miss Chicken July 18 2013 09:36 AM

40 and Over Club Meeting
 
Been a while since the Old Farts have had one of their meetings so maybe we will have a new member or two.

Topic today is

YOUR POLITICALLY INCORRECT CHILDHOOD.

I loved F Troop which is regarded as unPC today. We also had a copy of Little Black Sambo on the bookshelves though I can't remember if I read it or not, luckily the story has now been altered to be political correct.

So, oldies what unPC shows did you watch, what unPC books did you read, what unPC games did you play etc?

Savage Dragon July 18 2013 04:54 PM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
Looney Toons that didn't have any of the violence edited out.

137th Gebirg July 18 2013 05:19 PM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
4 little words: "Song of the South".

Tora Ziyal July 18 2013 06:07 PM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
When I was five-ish, I played cowboys and Indians with the boy next door. He was a couple years older and the only other kid on the block.

macloudt July 18 2013 08:33 PM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
Quote:

TheSeeker wrote: (Post 8396710)
Looney Toons that didn't have any of the violence edited out.

What, is some of the violence edited out nowadays? Good grief.

In the 70s I used to read a lot of Bobbsey Twins books, where the family had Sam and Dinah, the stereotypical laughing, happy black couple who were cook/housemaid and handyman, living in the attic on the Bobbsey family home. Their speech was always written linguistically, such as "honey chile [child]". I'm assuming this has been altered quite drastically in modern versions of the book. I believe a lot of the books were written in the 30s, and I don't think the dialogue had been changed much, if any, when I was reading them 40 years later. I'm sure there were other very un-PC stereotypes in the books, but I can't remember any other ones off-hand.

In my brothers' Tintin books, which I loved as a kid, people of African decent were always depicted as having huge lips and being none too bright. It's a good thing Captain Haddock's swearing was already edited out; it saved modern book printers from having to do so. ;)

T'Bonz July 18 2013 09:56 PM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
**Thinks**

We read the Little Black Sambo book in school.

Christian holidays were celebrated in schools (Easter-related and especially Christmas-related activities were common). I miss that....maybe I should put this in TNZ's Say Something Unpopular thread.

We ate "N----- babies" candy.

Girls weren't allowed to do a lot of fun stuff. I *hated* this.

First American Immigrants (I refuse to use Native American as anyone born here is that, and they were immigrants from Asia, not native to this continent) were called Indians and were often the bad guys.

In the South when I was a kid, there was still segregation in some areas (Florida schools didn't desegregate until 1972).

Most blacks on TV when I was a kid were in subservient roles, like as a maid or such. Shows like Julia (she was a nurse) were a breath of fresh air.

Cartoons showed lots of stereotypes - women, blacks, Mexicans, etc.

sojourner July 18 2013 11:28 PM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
We used to have Sunday breakfast at Sambo's restaurant.

Miss Chicken July 19 2013 12:23 AM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
I also read the Bobbsey Twins when I was young but I had totally forgotten that Sam and Dinah were in them. I am tempted to buy a new version of the Bobbsey Twins to see what changes have been made. There are a couple of free Bobbsey Twins e-books on Amazon but there seem to be older versions that are now in the public domain.

I was thinking about Little Black Sambo in bed last night and I realised it was probably read to me and it scared me because of the tigers melting into butter. I most likely refused to read it after that.

Quote:

When I was five-ish, I played cowboys and Indians with the boy next door. He was a couple years older and the only other kid on the block.
When I was young I had a 'Indian maiden" costume which consisted of a long black, braided wig (mde of wool) and a 'buckskin' dress. As a result I got to be the Indian when playing Cowboys and Indians and this meant I usually ended up being shot dead.

I think there were some TV series that gave a sympathetic portrayal of Indians most notably "Broken Arrow" but I haven't viewed it since my childhood.

scotpens July 19 2013 01:20 AM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
Quote:

T'Bonz wrote: (Post 8397730)
Most blacks on TV when I was a kid were in subservient roles, like as a maid or such. Shows like Julia (she was a nurse) were a breath of fresh air.

How about I Spy? It debuted in 1965 (three years before Julia) and co-starred Bill Cosby as the partner, friend and social equal of Robert Culp's character. And he was a spy! That was cool.

Quote:

Cartoons showed lots of stereotypes - women, blacks, Mexicans, etc.
You mean like this little dude?

http://www.hostpic.org/images/1307190541090108.jpg

Hey, Speedy Gonzales was funny!

Aside from popular media, does anyone remember chocolate and bubble gum "cigarettes"? In my day, they were just part of innocent kids playing at being grownups. Try peddling candy cigs to kids today and there'll be demands for your head on a stick.

marksound July 19 2013 01:39 AM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
Seven-Up candy bar: seven different chocolate covered flavors in one bar. When I was a kid, everybody I knew called the Brazil nut in the middle a "n----- toe."

One of my favorite movies of all time, and was hell to find on DVD: Zorro, The Gay Blade. Starring George Hamilton, it was much funnier than Love At First Bite but as I remember didn't do well at the box office. It's all but disappeared from the market.

Can you even find Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn in a library these days? I loved those books growing up.

There's probably more but I'm getting old and it will take me a while to remember the best stuff.

scotpens July 19 2013 01:53 AM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
Quote:

Carcazoid wrote: (Post 8398660)
One of my favorite movies of all time, and was hell to find on DVD: Zorro, The Gay Blade. Starring George Hamilton, it was much funnier than Love At First Bite but as I remember didn't do well at the box office. It's all but disappeared from the market.

Is Zorro, the Gay Blade considered "politically incorrect" now? Why would that be? It's a very funny movie.

(Little-known fact: Story-wise, Zorro, the Gay Blade is a reworking of the David F. Friedman sexploitation flick The Erotic Adventures of Zorro -- only without the naked stuff.)

Quote:

Can you even find Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn in a library these days? I loved those books growing up.
Both of those books are in public domain and the complete text of them can be easily found online. Huckleberry Finn as assigned reading in schools remains controversial, mainly because of "that word."

marksound July 19 2013 02:29 AM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
Quote:

scotpens wrote: (Post 8398705)
Quote:

Carcazoid wrote: (Post 8398660)
One of my favorite movies of all time, and was hell to find on DVD: Zorro, The Gay Blade. Starring George Hamilton, it was much funnier than Love At First Bite but as I remember didn't do well at the box office. It's all but disappeared from the market.

Is Zorro, the Gay Blade considered "politically incorrect" now? Why would that be? It's a very funny movie.

I don't know. I think it's hilarious, but I'm sure the easily offended might take exception. All I know for sure is that it was very hard to find when I was looking for a copy. But it's in my regular rotation, and I can pretty much quote all the dialog as it plays.

The funniest lines in the movie?
"Where is your invitation, Senor Beaver?"
"To be your friend I would have to be more than clumsy, I would have to be stupid!"
"Here I am!"
"NECK! NECK! NECK!"

Quote:

(Little-known fact: Story-wise, Zorro, the Gay Blade is a reworking of the David F. Friedman sexploitation flick The Erotic Adventures of Zorro -- only without the naked stuff.
I did not know that.

Quote:

Can you even find Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn in a library these days? I loved those books growing up.
Quote:

Both of those books are in public domain and the complete text of them can be easily found online. Huckleberry Finn as assigned reading in schools remains controversial, mainly because of "that word."
It's sad that people have become so sensitive to a single word that great literature is controversial. In the books it isn't even in a derogatory tone, but in the context of the time it was written.

137th Gebirg July 19 2013 02:38 AM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
^^^ You should have watched Don Lemon's "The N Word" special on CNN a couple weeks back. I didn't know whether to laugh or cry.

DrCorby July 19 2013 02:40 AM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
I remember toons who, when explosions went off in their faces, suddenly looked stereotypically Negro, sometimes even with ribbons in their hair. This was especially true in early Tom & Jerry cartoons.

Quote:

scotpens wrote: (Post 8398588)
Aside from popular media, does anyone remember chocolate and bubble gum "cigarettes"? In my day, they were just part of innocent kids playing at being grownups. Try peddling candy cigs to kids today and there'll be demands for your head on a stick.

We'd get peppermint-flavored white "cigarette" candy, and my parents weren't even smokers. But my sister and I certainly knew the "proper" way to hold them... That would never fly today!

Then there was the set of lawn darts we owned...

scotpens July 19 2013 02:44 AM

Re: 40 and Over Club Meeting
 
Quote:

Carcazoid wrote: (Post 8398810)
It's sad that people have become so sensitive to a single word that great literature is controversial. In the books it isn't even in a derogatory tone, but in the context of the time it was written.

It should be pointed out that, while Mark Twain's Tom Sawyer was first published in 1876 and Huckleberry Finn in 1884, both novels take place in the antebellum period, circa 1840. Twain wasn't writing contemporary fiction; he was writing about an era that was already history.


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