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Tacopowell April 16 2013 12:28 PM

3D Display
 
In ENT, Cold Front, the Time traveller brings back a pod that projects a 3D display,

This technology is not far from been available today,
in 2001 when this episode was made, surely it wouldn't have been to far fetched to imagine this technology?
So why was Archer so amazed?

http://i.imgur.com/2Uk3oAZ.png

F. King Daniel April 16 2013 01:43 PM

Re: 3D Display
 
It was what he was showing him that was amazing. Look at all the timelines they're monitoring! The different parts of history (and alternate histories, no doubt) being explored. Watching te Great Pyramid being built! The sheer amazing scope of what is possible in Daniels' era.

C.E. Evans April 16 2013 04:23 PM

Re: 3D Display
 
I've actually been wondering about the validity of 3D displays aboard a starship. Sure, they're great in a stable home or office setting, but in a combat situation where the ship is violently tossed about and more delicate systems tend to go offline, it might be better to have something more rugged like standard consoles for control interfaces, with 3D reserved for less vital stuff like conference meeting presentations (I remember TNG used a 3D display in "The Last Outpost").

Timo April 16 2013 05:41 PM

Re: 3D Display
 
Basically, 3D allows you to see more sides to the issue, or immerses you in the situation.

But you can achieve the former simply by commanding the image to rotate, regardless of whether it exists in a volume of space, on a flat display panel, on a curved helmet visor, etc. And the latter isn't all that useful for us poor humans who only have two eyes, both pointing forward - it does much more for situational awareness if you take the observer out of immersion, and instead concentrate all the information conveniently in front of him.

So "freestanding", "holographic" views aren't really all that advantageous. Sure, they may be pretty, but they may well be far less informative than non-freestanding three-dimensional views. Say, you have a conference at Observation Lounge and want your officers to view the schematic of the enemy fortress from all sides to find optimal ways in. If you have one beautifully freestanding holo-fortress there, rotating above the conference table, it's user-hostile: if LaForge is looking at the front gate, Worf must settle for looking at the rear ramparts, and if they rotate it, one wins but the other loses. Much better to have separate images for each officer - and those don't benefit at all from being freestanding.

Timo Saloniemi

Gaith April 16 2013 06:05 PM

Re: 3D Display
 
Quote:

Tacopowell wrote: (Post 7951765)
In ENT, Cold Front, the Time traveller brings back a pod that projects a 3D display,

This technology is not far from been available today

[citation needed]

BillJ April 16 2013 06:51 PM

Re: 3D Display
 
http://i1187.photobucket.com/albums/...ps4055c23d.png

"Hey, I can see the Abramverse from here!"

EnsignRedshirt April 17 2013 03:54 AM

Re: 3D Display
 
Quote:

C.E. Evans wrote: (Post 7952626)
I've actually been wondering about the validity of 3D displays aboard a starship. Sure, they're great in a stable home or office setting, but in a combat situation where the ship is violently tossed about and more delicate systems tend to go offline, it might be better to have something more rugged like standard consoles for control interfaces, with 3D reserved for less vital stuff like conference meeting presentations (I remember TNG used a 3D display in "The Last Outpost").

I loved that display in "The Last Outpost". I wish they had utilized it fairly frequently.

Redfern April 18 2013 04:15 PM

Re: 3D Display
 
Did they have the wall mounted display devices yet when "The Last OutPost" was recorded? I wonder if that holo-"plate" was intended to be the primary display, but since it required opticals, the production dumped the concept for the more pedestrian backlit graphic.

Sincerely,

Bill

Mytran April 23 2013 12:51 PM

Re: 3D Display
 
No, that screen didn't turn up until TNG got it's own dedicated Observation Lounge set in season 2. In season 1 they simply redressed Sickbay.

bryce April 30 2013 03:06 AM

Re: 3D Display
 
Wasn't there that episode of DS9 where a future version of Bashir and...somebody else...was on the Defiant and said somethignabout how they couldn't believe how they got by with these old 2-dimensional displays...???

Third Nacelle April 30 2013 03:34 AM

Re: 3D Display
 
Quote:

bryce wrote: (Post 8021893)
Wasn't there that episode of DS9 where a future version of Bashir and...somebody else...was on the Defiant and said somethignabout how they couldn't believe how they got by with these old 2-dimensional displays...???

That was The Visitor, and I think they were talking about 3-D control panels.

Aside from navigation, I really can't think of many instances where a 3D display would provide more functionality than a 2D display. Sure it looks cool to us, but I'd imagine people in the 24th century aren't impressed with stuff like that. That's why LCARS is so simple.

Tiberius April 30 2013 04:17 AM

Re: 3D Display
 
The thing about 3D displays is that they need something to project the image ONTO. Sure, we have 3D cinemas and televisions and all that, but in all of those we are dealing with a 3D image being shown on a 2D surface.

To project a 3D image into thin air is beyond any technology we have today.

Timo April 30 2013 02:56 PM

Re: 3D Display
 
Not really... "Thin air" can count for the required "something" if it's, say, moist enough. 2D displays using walls of mist as the projection surface are relatively commonplace already; 3D could theoretically be implemented as well.

But today's technology can easily produce "freestanding" imagery in empty space by a far simpler means. Just project it directly at the eyes of the audience, by using software that tracks the eyes of each individual spectator and shines the required images directly onto those, customized for each, well, customer.

3D vision is an illusion in any case (even when we're viewing actual physical objects), and the illusion is created by carefully manipulating the imagery falling on our eyes. Doing it eye by eye is merely a minor complication today's computers can easily manage, and probably a lesser complication than those involved in more "conventional" 3D projection techniques.

Timo Saloniemi

Third Nacelle April 30 2013 06:13 PM

Re: 3D Display
 
I would think that it's much more practical and plausible to simply project a 3D display onto one's retina than into thin air.

Or better yet, wire the images straight into the optic nerve.

Tiberius May 1 2013 03:55 AM

Re: 3D Display
 
Quote:

Timo wrote: (Post 8023537)
Not really... "Thin air" can count for the required "something" if it's, say, moist enough. 2D displays using walls of mist as the projection surface are relatively commonplace already; 3D could theoretically be implemented as well.

How would this work?

For it to be used as a regular 2D display, I could see it. You just need a sheet of mist to project your image onto. But a 3D display would require a VOLUME of mist. So if you have the projector at the front (like a cinema projector), then it will have to project a beam of light through the front part of the image in order to show something at the back. How could this work without creating a visible effect in the mist that the beam travels through?

In any case, I don't think Daniels' gizmo shot a cloud of mist into the room first.

Quote:

But today's technology can easily produce "freestanding" imagery in empty space by a far simpler means. Just project it directly at the eyes of the audience, by using software that tracks the eyes of each individual spectator and shines the required images directly onto those, customized for each, well, customer.

3D vision is an illusion in any case (even when we're viewing actual physical objects), and the illusion is created by carefully manipulating the imagery falling on our eyes. Doing it eye by eye is merely a minor complication today's computers can easily manage, and probably a lesser complication than those involved in more "conventional" 3D projection techniques.

Timo Saloniemi
Got any more about this? It seems interesting.


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